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Forum topic by GaryCK posted 11-29-2019 05:34 AM 594 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GaryCK

127 posts in 1131 days


11-29-2019 05:34 AM

Topic tags/keywords: door frame exterior door wood

Part of the bottom of the frame around the pre-hung door to my detached garage / wood shop broke off the other day from the wood rotting through. It was scheduled to rain heavily that afternoon so I built replacement parts out of hard maple I had on hand. I’m fairly certain that’s not the right material for the job as it was all kinds of difficult to get screws into it to attach the parts. I live in northeast Wisconsin and it is too cold for glue right now.

I plan on this being a temporary fix to get me through until next spring. I expect I’ll choose to replace the entire door frame to improve on what’s there. What is the right species of wood to use for that type of project? I can’t imagine the original wood was anything more than pine or poplar but I’m not sure of that.

Thank you in advance.

-- Gary, Wisconsin


15 replies so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

118162 posts in 4659 days


#1 posted 11-29-2019 05:37 AM

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GaryCK

127 posts in 1131 days


#2 posted 11-29-2019 01:44 PM

Thanks, Jim. The WOOD article is a good starting point.

-- Gary, Wisconsin

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

482 posts in 678 days


#3 posted 11-29-2019 11:47 PM

PVC?

Not sure how it handles the cold winter temps of Wisconsin. But, I’ve always appreciated the permanence of PVC when it comes to rot.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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pottz

16850 posts in 2066 days


#4 posted 11-30-2019 01:00 AM

if it’s the threshold white oak is what is used most commonly,here in the west.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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GaryCK

127 posts in 1131 days


#5 posted 11-30-2019 01:10 AM

Thank you both for your thoughts.

John: Where do you buy PVC for this type of application? I’ve not seen it in board-type stock before. Having said that, I don’t recall ever having a reason to look. I’d imagine PVC would cut on a table saw and miter saw, maybe with a different type of blade better suited for that material.

Pottz: The part of the frame that rotted was just above the threshold on one side of the door. The top-facing part of the threshold is aluminum. I’m not sure what’s underneath that, though it appeared to be some kind of composite or maybe wood, looking from the side.

Gary

-- Gary, Wisconsin

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

2803 posts in 2058 days


#6 posted 11-30-2019 01:13 AM

black locust

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tmasondarnell

152 posts in 2871 days


#7 posted 11-30-2019 02:10 AM

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RDan

183 posts in 3405 days


#8 posted 11-30-2019 02:35 AM

You, can use pine, but you have to paint it, otherwise get some pressure treated decking to use. Dan

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GaryCK

127 posts in 1131 days


#9 posted 11-30-2019 03:34 AM

Thank you all for your replies.

corelz125: Interesting choice. I’ve never asked if my local sawmill carries black locust.

tmasondarnell: I’ll admit to not being surprised there is a product like that available. I wasn’t aware of it, though.

RDan: I suspect the existing frame may have been painted pine. It did last 19 years in Wisconsin, so that ain’t bad durability.

Gary

-- Gary, Wisconsin

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corelz125

2803 posts in 2058 days


#10 posted 11-30-2019 09:38 PM

Black locust seems to be not thought of very often. The stuff never rots though.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

482 posts in 678 days


#11 posted 12-01-2019 04:19 AM

I’ve always bought my PVC stuff at lumber yards, or big box home centers. Probably bought half of it at Home Depot.

Most of these places carry several typical trim profiles and flat boards. Sheets are usually a lumber yard item.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7678 posts in 1656 days


#12 posted 12-01-2019 07:37 AM

You can buy upgrade frames with plastic, PVC, treated wood, and a host of other longer wearing materials. That has been the weakest link of doors seeing outdoor exposure for a long time. Sadly finding just the frame is hard to do, Usually you are looking at a new door, with an upgrade frame.

Maple doesn’t do outdoors too well. But it likely will get you through to Spring easily enough.

-- Think safe, be safe

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pottz

16850 posts in 2066 days


#13 posted 12-01-2019 06:44 PM

mahogany works well,ive got some outdoor patio tables i made from it several years ago and there holding up quite well.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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JackDuren

1550 posts in 2041 days


#14 posted 12-01-2019 07:30 PM

If it’s a temporary fix pine would be fine…

View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

127 posts in 1131 days


#15 posted 12-01-2019 10:06 PM

Thanks again, everyone, for the replies. I do appreciate them all.

-- Gary, Wisconsin

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