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Cutting thin strips from wide board

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Forum topic by Oldschoolguy posted 11-27-2019 04:31 PM 1336 views 1 time favorited 36 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Oldschoolguy

108 posts in 691 days


11-27-2019 04:31 PM

Hi y’all, Excuse me for being dumber than a box of rocks. When performing the above mentioned procedure, which is the most safest way to cut it? Wide side towards fence or narrow side against the fence? Thanks and to all LJ’s and families, have a safe and prosperous holiday season. In addition, I want to thank all of your for your help, it means alot to me.

The best,
Floyd Mills


36 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

6412 posts in 3066 days


#1 posted 11-27-2019 04:34 PM

Wide toward the fence, the thin strip becomes the offcut. If you do a Google search for “thin strip jig” you can see how to set up a stop to rip consistent thin pieces.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View sras's profile

sras

5566 posts in 3984 days


#2 posted 11-27-2019 04:36 PM

For me, it depends on how thin. I have a Zero Clearance Insert around my blade and very thin push sticks. I’ll put the thin side against the fence until I feel the strips are too thin and I don’t think I’ll have enough control. As to what that thickness is – that’s a personal choice focused entirely on safety.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5844 posts in 3206 days


#3 posted 11-27-2019 04:44 PM

With my saw, I’ll go down to 1/4”, thin side to the fence. Any thinner than that and I’ll go with a thin rip jig where the wide side is against the fence. A zero clearance insert is a must.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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GR8HUNTER

7799 posts in 1567 days


#4 posted 11-27-2019 04:53 PM

thin side against fence with a good push stick shoe you could cut all day safely ….BUT you have to do what you feel safe with yourself :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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pottz

11308 posts in 1839 days


#5 posted 11-27-2019 04:57 PM

im also with the thin side against the fence group but as said you need to do what your comfortable with.just be safe.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1239 posts in 456 days


#6 posted 11-27-2019 05:06 PM

I ran into this when cutting 5” strips of plywood to later cut in half again. I know that the off cut should be on the outside of the blade and fence but didn’t want to need to reposition the fence each cut. So like you I asked here and got several answers. Once I determined that I could safely keep the fence fixed for equal cuts I went to town and cut all the strips. Once all were the same size I attached a featherboard to the saw track and started to rip each again. None of mine were small enough to require a zero clearance plate.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2606 posts in 4298 days


#7 posted 11-27-2019 05:48 PM

If the pieces are not very long I would prefer to use a sled with a stop set for the thickness of the thin strips. Longer pieces I usually cut with the cut strip against the fence and using a feather board to keep the wood against the fence.

If it is something you do a lot of there are devices you can mount for quick fence adjustment between cuts to putting the strip on the off side of the blade.

-- Les B, Oregon

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fivecodys

1647 posts in 2491 days


#8 posted 11-27-2019 06:33 PM

I use a thin-strip jig.
I found the idea here. https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/84494

It works well.

-- A bad day woodworking is still better than a good day working.

View DannyW's profile

DannyW

284 posts in 652 days


#9 posted 11-27-2019 07:34 PM

I like this idea for doing short strips. I have had very good lick with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd8KLMYNQ5w

-- DannyW

View Andre's profile

Andre

3702 posts in 2661 days


#10 posted 11-27-2019 07:42 PM



I like this idea for doing short strips. I have had very good lick with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd8KLMYNQ5w

- DannyW

Now that is worth coping! Thanks.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View pottz's profile

pottz

11308 posts in 1839 days


#11 posted 11-27-2019 08:40 PM


I like this idea for doing short strips. I have had very good lick with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd8KLMYNQ5w

- DannyW

Now that is worth coping! Thanks.

- Andre

+1 i am copying that,much easier and safer.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

4614 posts in 4597 days


#12 posted 11-27-2019 08:47 PM

“Safest” is wide side being pushed through the cut.
But it just depends what you are doing. I cut 1/8 – 1/4” strips against the fence often for lamination bending, and to adjust the fence constantly to get a uniform strip as an offcut is too much fooling around. I know you can make a “off cut” stop and slide the fence to move the workpiece to the stop… just not the way I do it.

-- “The two most important days in your life are the day you are born and the day you find out why.” Mark Twain

View DannyW's profile

DannyW

284 posts in 652 days


#13 posted 11-27-2019 08:57 PM


I like this idea for doing short strips. I have had very good lick with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd8KLMYNQ5w

- DannyW

Now that is worth coping! Thanks.

- Andre

+1 i am copying that,much easier and safer.

- pottz

Glad I could help. After doing a lot of searching how to cut thin strips this looked the simplest and safest way to do it to me. It has the advantage of cutting on the fence side but yet giving enough space to be safe. The disadvantage is of course that it only works for short strips but that is what I usually need.

-- DannyW

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

1994 posts in 402 days


#14 posted 11-27-2019 09:12 PM


I like this idea for doing short strips. I have had very good lick with it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sd8KLMYNQ5w

- DannyW

What I use, a little safer, IMO. The left hand is neutral. And the “height” block can easily be swapped out for whatever height you need.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: The Big Bang: Nothing - exploded into Everything. Thanks to Nothing.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

6290 posts in 1429 days


#15 posted 11-27-2019 09:36 PM

A good video giving you 3 usable ways to do these cuts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKOefGSSl4A&feature=emb_logo

Marc talks about using a bandsaw, and I agree if you have several to cut it’s safest by far, and wastes less material. Just know the finished cuts will need some smoothing. If you have a wide belt sander they are perfect to do that step.

No BS or wide sander then Table saw is the best bet, and using a glueline ready blade you can dispense with some, if not all of the sanding.

I like the 3rd option the best, and is as good a reason to own a magnetic base as any I can think of. I’m not big on the first method, because I have too often had them turn into missiles, and come shooting back. Usually no harm is done if you are standing off the blade, but if they smack anything, sometimes it breaks the really thin ones up. The middle one works great, and keeps you from having to keep moving the fence, but as Marc says on longer pieces that way can get a little weird. I limit that way to 14” long.

-- Think safe, be safe

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