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Repairing scratches in cedar tongue and groove

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Forum topic by jonlan posted 11-24-2019 03:44 PM 921 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jonlan

72 posts in 2133 days


11-24-2019 03:44 PM

Hi all. When we bought our house our dog was a puppy and we made the mistake of leaving her in a room that had cedar tongue and groove in it. She took advantage of that and in several places scratched at the walls to attempt and get something from behind a couch. I’d like to repair these now and while I’ve had some luck matching the finish (I think) I can’t quite get it to blend in. If you look at the picture below, you can see that the bottom board has the scratches on it and I’ve attempted to repair them on the board above it. Looks like I didnt quite sand far enough down (the scratches are well into the wood) as you can still see some extension of a couple of them into the top board. In either case, my main issue is that it’s just not blending.

I sanded down the area by hand with 120 grit and had all of the existing finish off leaving the bare wood. I then used some minwax gloss rub on poly and was surprised at how well it appeared to match the existing. The problem seems to be the edges though. It almost looks to me like at the edges Im seeing some of the existing finish taper into the area that was fully sanded. I did my best and smooth the totally bare wood into the existing finish with a 250 grit sanding block but it sure looks to me like that’s what Im seeing underneath.

My first thought is that the original finish has aged and what Im seeing is the color difference between newly finished wood and the original aged finish. Any ideas on how to better blend this in? Im thinking my only option might be to sand down the entire board in each case and refinish.

Thanks


4 replies so far

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bilyo

1408 posts in 2348 days


#1 posted 11-24-2019 06:01 PM

I think you are correct. You didn’t sand quite deeply enough. Cross grain scratches like that tear the grain and the effects go deep. I think your best approach is to start again but with coarser sandpaper like 80 grit always sanding with the grain, not across it. The coarser paper will do the initial wood removal more quickly and save work in the long run. As you proceed through finer grits, 100, 150, and maybe 180, check your work by applying some mineral spirits (paint thinner). This will highlight, temporarily, the cross grain scratches if they remain and tell you when it is OK to continue to the next finer grit. When you are satisfied with the results of the paint thinner test, let it dry and apply your finish. You are correct. The Min Wax product seems to blend quite well.

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jonlan

72 posts in 2133 days


#2 posted 11-24-2019 06:50 PM

Thanks for the reply @bilyo. Any advice on the how to better blend the edges into the existing urethane? Im not entirely pleased with how the edges of the area I sanded blend. It’s almost like by sanding the existing urethane I made it more visible.

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bilyo

1408 posts in 2348 days


#3 posted 11-25-2019 02:13 AM

That is not always easy. Do you have or do you know anyone that has an air brush or small spray gun. This might be the best way. It might be necessary to re-coat the full length of the board you are working on, or at least to a greater distance each side of the repair area. Also, thin the finish material and apply multiple thin coats until it blends the best. Don’t try to do it one or two coats.

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timmib

14 posts in 2011 days


#4 posted 11-25-2019 03:51 AM

After you’re done sanding, you might dampen the wood to raise the grain and then try a bleaching solution with a qtip in the deepest scratch marks. Leave it alone overnight. That should give you an indication if you can successfully remove the oxidation/darkness from the scratch marks. Imho, floors are difficult because of all the dirt, grease … that gets into the pores. To my eye, the first sanding you did was just about right.

-- Kim, Chillicothe, MO

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