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I THINK I NEED A NEW AIR COMPRESSOR

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Forum topic by GR8HUNTER posted 11-23-2019 02:49 PM 691 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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GR8HUNTER

9128 posts in 1995 days


11-23-2019 02:49 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question air compressor

sorry if this is the wrong forum but i do think there is a safety issue here
first let me say 20 years ago i bought a direct drive oilless 5 hp 26 gallon upright air compressor thing was a bear to drain after use so I put a street 90 on it then a long nipple then a ball valve to make it eiser to drain now I have air compressor in other shed with lines running to workshop so here is my problem I went to drain it other day and nothing came out no water no air nothing so I took off pipes and 90 cleaned them out put back on still nothing comes out also there is a touch of rust on the outside after I seen that I walked away as I had a compressor blow up already it is not pretty so im looking for suggestions on how to fix or buy new one which brand ? I dont want to spend 1000.00 dollars for one since its only a hobby for me :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))


12 replies so far

View SouthavenToyMaker's profile

SouthavenToyMaker

216 posts in 2770 days


#1 posted 11-23-2019 02:53 PM

I have a California Air from Amazon, very quiet compared to most. It’s only 8 gallons but works well for me. I can’t remember if they make a larger version.

-- Sean

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1379 posts in 2191 days


#2 posted 11-23-2019 03:14 PM

California Air do make a variety of sizes but they ain’t cheap. Is it possible to simply replace the tank? If not, Black Friday sales have already started at HD. If you’re in the market for a new replacement, now’s the time.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

1421 posts in 2385 days


#3 posted 11-23-2019 03:16 PM

I second what SouthavenToyMaker said about California Air. I’ve had the 20 gal model for about a year and is a nice compressor. Relatively quiet. You can stand next to it a carry on a conversation. It appears from advertisements that other companies are making “quiet” models also.

To your existing compressor problem: does the gauge show pressure in the tank? If not, maybe the tank is leaking and will not hold any pressure. Hence, nothing to drain. Or, perhaps the regulator is malfunctioning and bleeding off air to the tank. If there is pressure in the tank, you should be able to bleed it through the hose with the motor off or with the pressure release valve (little brass plug with a metal ring pull). Then you can safely determine what, if anything, is wrong with the drain plug/valve.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

9128 posts in 1995 days


#4 posted 11-23-2019 03:29 PM



I second what SouthavenToyMaker said about California Air. I ve had the 20 gal model for about a year and is a nice compressor. Relatively quiet. You can stand next to it a carry on a conversation. It appears from advertisements that other companies are making “quiet” models also.

To your existing compressor problem: does the gauge show pressure in the tank? If not, maybe the tank is leaking and will not hold any pressure. Hence, nothing to drain. Or, perhaps the regulator is malfunctioning and bleeding off air to the tank. If there is pressure in the tank, you should be able to bleed it through the hose with the motor off or with the pressure release valve (little brass plug with a metal ring pull). Then you can safely determine what, if anything, is wrong with the drain plug/valve.

- bilyo


yes I show just over 125 psi in tank and I can drain it down by safety valve and or hose until 90 psi then it kicks back on and fills again to 125 psi I know it seems weird why I started this thread :<((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

4173 posts in 3140 days


#5 posted 11-23-2019 04:47 PM

I would bleed all the pressure off and clean out the bottom of the tank as much as possible. Mine tank has a 3” to 3/4” reducer. So unscrewing it from the bottom would give good access.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

9128 posts in 1995 days


#6 posted 11-23-2019 05:10 PM



I would bleed all the pressure off and clean out the bottom of the tank as much as possible. Mine tank has a 3” to 3/4” reducer. So unscrewing it from the bottom would give good access.

- diverlloyd


I wasn’t sure if that bigger plug comes out or not I am on my way to look right now thanks :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1460 posts in 1833 days


#7 posted 11-23-2019 08:29 PM

Possibly a dumb question but when u took the pipes and valve off did u make sure u can blow through them before u put it back on? Any chance the valve got stuck shut and isn’t letting air through?
Seems like a conversation lik this was started Mayb a year ago. I think someone suggesting pouring vinegar in the tank and letting it set for a few days to clean out the rust.

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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GR8HUNTER

9128 posts in 1995 days


#8 posted 11-23-2019 10:39 PM

I took the bong off found the problem was full to top of crud now i have a 2 inch hole what do you think about spraying water in there to clean more out ? :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View Carey  Mitchell's profile

Carey Mitchell

199 posts in 3241 days


#9 posted 11-23-2019 11:28 PM

More water can’t hurt much, as there had to be a lot to cause the rust. If you have access to another compressor, here is how I dried one out after washing.

Six feet of flexible 1/4” copper pipe. Wound it into a coil and clamped it to a couple of pieces of 1×4 for support. Then clamped a Harbor Freight heat gun so it directed the hot air through the coiled pipe. Then hooked up a smaller compressor with a little valve to regulate the air flow to a small amount. Then stuck the other end well inside the tank, with the hot air exiting the plug. I allowed it to run for about an hour, until the wife complained about the noise. When the entire tank gets hot, you can be assured that any water is coming out as vapor.

at least it worked for me.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

4933 posts in 4391 days


#10 posted 11-24-2019 02:40 AM

Try and measure the thickness of the tank at the bottom and a little further up to determine if you have enough true metal for a safe tank. Just remember that the thickness of the corroded metal will be tough to gauge…and that that corrosion is sure to be a source for crack propagation. Having had a compressor explode on me once, I try to make sure that I don’t have it happen again. Of course, in my case it was a head, not the tank, so it bled off “slowly”. o.0

ETA- Fact of the matter is, I think I’ll take my own advice and check out my now 22-year-old compressor.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

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GR8HUNTER

9128 posts in 1995 days


#11 posted 11-24-2019 03:10 PM

yes I know I actually had the tank explode wish now I took pictures of it i was walking toward the shed when it happened i had it fastened to the wall it tore up some 2×4 was not nice :<((

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN :<))

View Red5hft's profile

Red5hft

22 posts in 1068 days


#12 posted 11-24-2019 03:22 PM

I would see about having the tank professionally serviced/inspected or just replace it. The rust inside the tank appears to have reached a level where the integrity of the tank cannot be assured. As for replacements, I looked at the California Air compressors as I wanted a quieter compressor. I found some information indicating the tanks are not treated with any type of corrosion inhibitors as many others are. Living in a high humidity environment, this would be a liability possible shortening the life of the compressor. This could be remedied by careful maintenance or pre-treating the air to reduce humidity before the tank. I went with Puma two stage, as I need high capacity. It is belt drive, oil lubricated compressor, but it is amazingly quiet. Not near as quiet as CaliforniaAir, but tests out about 63db. Great value.

-- -"Whether you think you can, or you think you can't-you're right." - Henry Ford

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