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A great copying trick for making a pattern for cutting.

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Forum topic by Planeman40 posted 11-18-2019 03:41 PM 603 views 1 time favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Planeman40

1467 posts in 3319 days


11-18-2019 03:41 PM

Topic tags/keywords: trick

This just popped into my mind and I thought I would pass it along. I have used this for years to make a pattern for duplicating open holes, irregular surfaces, etc.

Place a piece of paper over the area to be copied and tape it down so it doesn’t move. Then use the side of the lead in a pencil to rub on the top of the paper over the edges of the work beneath. The sharp edge will make a nice crisp black line that will outline the edges of the work beneath. Just peel up the paper and tape or paste it on the wood, metal, or plastic to be cut and cut out the part. An old trick but a goody!!!

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!


7 replies so far

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tyvekboy

1941 posts in 3571 days


#1 posted 11-18-2019 03:57 PM

Have you ever tried aluminum foil?

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

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BurlyBob

6755 posts in 2823 days


#2 posted 11-18-2019 04:15 PM

I’ve used that trick a couple of times. I first saw it when a guy was replacing a gasket on a large pipe fitting. He used a piece of inner tube and a ball peen hammer. I thought that was quite inventive, cost effective and saved a parts run.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6752 posts in 3752 days


#3 posted 11-18-2019 05:16 PM

That’ll work fine, but if you’ve got a printer that has a scanner, take the original and make copies of it…..!!

-- " There's a better way to do it.....find it"...... Thomas Edison.

View Scap's profile

Scap

86 posts in 485 days


#4 posted 11-18-2019 06:34 PM



I ve used that trick a couple of times. I first saw it when a guy was replacing a gasket on a large pipe fitting. He used a piece of inner tube and a ball peen hammer. I thought that was quite inventive, cost effective and saved a parts run.

- BurlyBob

We would use cereal boxes, too. Hammer cuts it nice and clean against the face of the flange, and then we’d just paint the gasket with some antiseize, bolt it up, and move on to the next job.

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Planeman40

1467 posts in 3319 days


#5 posted 11-18-2019 07:56 PM

Hmmmmm . . . Never tried aluminum foil. How would you use it?

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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muesli

474 posts in 2067 days


#6 posted 11-18-2019 08:51 PM

Ha, that ’s curios. I posted another method short time ago:

Do you know a “tick stick or ticking stick”? I didn’t until Lea explained it. I love solutions like that!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cd2LY857oTY

-- Uwe from Germany.

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Planeman40

1467 posts in 3319 days


#7 posted 11-19-2019 02:54 AM

Yes, I am aware of the “tick stick or ticking stick”. But the method I outlined above is more accurate and can handle irregular shapes. It also gives a paper pattern directly from the source with fewer chances of an error in re-laying out the pattern.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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