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Question, front glass for display case

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Forum topic by Charlie H. posted 11-17-2019 04:54 PM 229 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charlie H.

394 posts in 1212 days


11-17-2019 04:54 PM

Hello,
I am building a wall hanging display case for my sister’s pet memorabilia.
It will contain a box type urn, two picture frames, and a 4 inch diameter plaster casting.
The outside dimensions of the case are 29.25 L x 13.75 H x 6 D (inches).
My prepped material (cherry) is just shy of 7/8” thick.

Basic construction will be mitered corners with splines, cherry plywood backer board, and a glass front.
The plywood backer will be inset with a rabbet and it will be removable.
The stuff inside will all be mounted to the backer board.
I plan to hang it with a French cleat.

My initial plan was to install the glass in a dado like a floating box top, but now that it is time to start cutting the dados and the rabbets I am questioning whether the glass should be installed like this.

Do y’all think installing the glass permanently like this is OK ?
If not what methodology do you recommend ?

Thanks for taking the time to read this post.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------


6 replies so far

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

421 posts in 289 days


#1 posted 11-17-2019 05:12 PM

I would dado all the way around but slot the top so the glass could slide in and out through the slot.
If it ever gets broke you can easily replace it without tearing apart the box.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5783 posts in 3805 days


#2 posted 11-17-2019 05:15 PM

The dado depth should be larger than the glass size. You can use rubber “space balls” in the grooves to allow for expansion/contraction which could crack the glass.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5836 posts in 3055 days


#3 posted 11-17-2019 05:55 PM

I certainly would not want the glass permanently installed. There’s probably several ways to do it, but LeeRoyman’s idea would work well.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2232 posts in 4005 days


#4 posted 11-17-2019 06:34 PM

Here is a glass retaining product that works well and makes it easy to replace the glass if needed.

https://www.amazon.com/Sommerfelds-Clear-Rubber-Glass-Retainer/dp/B01KQQRS20/ref=asc_df_B01KQQRS20/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=193994910693&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=1060214448167165703&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033030&hvtargid=pla-310821577160&psc=1

I have used it to mount glass panels in clock cases.
Cut a dado 3/8” to 1/2” square, then a second 1/8” deeper dado for the “cleats” on the plastic retainer strip to lock into. I find I can cut both on my table saw.

Here is a crude drawing of how it works. The yellow is the “clear” plastic retainer, blue green the glass.
You could also do something similar with thin strips of wood in the second dado to retain the glass but the plastic retainer has a “cup” action that a downward pressure on the glass.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

394 posts in 1212 days


#5 posted 11-17-2019 08:32 PM

Thanks to all for the speedy replies, I really appreciate the alternate recommendations.
Best regards,
Charlie

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

394 posts in 1212 days


#6 posted 11-28-2019 02:22 PM



I would dado all the way around but slot the top so the glass could slide in and out through the slot.
If it ever gets broke you can easily replace it without tearing apart the box.
- LeeRoyMan

Thanks again.
I used this method for the front glass.
Cutting the slot was not as difficult as I thought it might be.
I clamped the board to the tablesaw fence and raised the blade through the board.
It took a few cycles to get it close and then I finished the final dimension with a hand saw.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

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