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How do I make this trim cut?

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Forum topic by Andybb posted 11-17-2019 02:05 AM 658 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

2614 posts in 1279 days


11-17-2019 02:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: carving shaping finishing joining carving tool sander tip question trick

Is there an established technique to making this a seamless joint? There is a 10 degree angle. The trim was made with a roundover bit. I’ve got the usual suspects of hand and power tools as well as a jig I made to cut the angle and a box full of carving tools that I know very little about. Seems like the back of the trim needs to be hollowed out??? If there is an established way to do it i figure it’s a skill I need to learn. I’m going to stain the trim for contrast but I figure i should make the cuts first, stain, then fix in place.

Thanks in advance.

-- Andy - Seattle USA


12 replies so far

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Sawdust35

75 posts in 1538 days


#1 posted 11-17-2019 02:22 AM

Based on your summary, I would either cut the two pieces of trim at a 40-degree angle (80degree joint). Or cut one piece at 40-degree angle and cope it to overlap the other piece. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pY3fhJRGpuE

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Axis39

169 posts in 272 days


#2 posted 11-17-2019 02:34 AM

Keep one at full length and, as Sawdust35 says, chop and cope at -5˚. The cope should slide right over the full length piece. You may have to back cut your cope slightly (i.e. take a little more out than a straight 90˚ cut. I do this on crown all the time, to make sure it fits tight at the edge of the joint.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Andybb

2614 posts in 1279 days


#3 posted 11-17-2019 02:43 AM


Based on your summary, I would either cut the two pieces of trim at a 40-degree angle (80degree joint). Or cut one piece at 40-degree angle and cope it to overlap the other piece. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pY3fhJRGpuE

- Sawdust35

Hmmm. Is that 80 degrees because two 10 degree angles add up to 20? I just don’t think i have anything that can cope a piece of 1/4” stock that has a 1/4 round cut. But maybe a small round dremel grinding bit?


Keep one at full length and, as Sawdust35 says, chop and cope at -5˚. The cope should slide right over the full length piece. You may have to back cut your cope slightly (i.e. take a little more out than a straight 90˚ cut. I do this on crown all the time, to make sure it fits tight at the edge of the joint.

- Axis39

Hmmm…will try any and all suggestions. Back cutting and coping such a small piece might be hard but worth a try. I’ve done it with crown but this is so tiny.

One of the problems is that i used a 3/8” round over. The stock is 1/4” so maybe I’ll try a 1/4 round bit.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Sawdust35

75 posts in 1538 days


#4 posted 11-17-2019 03:01 AM

Andybb-
The 40-degree miter cut suggestion was assuming the angle of the frame was 80-degrees. If that is incorrect, divide the angle of the frame in half and cut miter accordingly.

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Andybb

2614 posts in 1279 days


#5 posted 11-17-2019 03:13 AM


Andybb-
The 40-degree miter cut suggestion was assuming the angle of the frame was 80-degrees. If that is incorrect, divide the angle of the frame in half and cut miter accordingly.

- Sawdust35

Sorry. My brain is a little fried today. This is a 10-degree angle.

It ain’t perfect but following the suggestion to make one piece full length and hollowing out the other piece with the curved carving tool is getting me close. I guess this is going to be a sharp hand tool operation.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

2614 posts in 1279 days


#6 posted 11-17-2019 04:40 AM

Never shy about realizing my mistakes…a 3/8 round over bit yields a wider diameter but also a shallower strip in this application. Using a 1/4” roundover on 1/4” stock makes for better symmetry and easier fitting. Duh!!

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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SMP

1880 posts in 581 days


#7 posted 11-17-2019 04:42 AM

Do you have a drill press? Because i have used those little sanding drums that you stick in the drill press for things like this after cutting and coping to get a tighter fit. Just sneak up on it with a properly sized drum. I got a kit at the big box store that has had 3 or 4 sized drums

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bilyo

1039 posts in 1778 days


#8 posted 11-17-2019 04:47 AM

Miter it. Using your jig and some trial and error with some scrap, you will find the correct angle. In the end, it will be easier, neater, and faster.

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Andybb

2614 posts in 1279 days


#9 posted 11-17-2019 04:56 AM


Do you have a drill press? Because i have used those little sanding drums that you stick in the drill press for things like this after cutting and coping to get a tighter fit. Just sneak up on it with a properly sized drum. I got a kit at the big box store that has had 3 or 4 sized drums

- SMP


Yes but I actually have an oscillating drum sander with a small size drum disc.!


Andybb-
The 40-degree miter cut suggestion was assuming the angle of the frame was 80-degrees. If that is incorrect, divide the angle of the frame in half and cut miter accordingly.

- Sawdust35

Oh. I guess I needed a beer. Now I get it and that was actually what I did a year ago and it worked great but couldn’t remember what I did. I actually didn’t measure the angles I just just kept kissing them with the disc sander until they were perfect and made a jig with those 2 angles.

Thanks.


Miter it. Using your jig and some trial and error with some scrap, you will find the correct angle. In the end, it will be easier, neater, and faster.

- bilyo

+100 I was finishing my beer when you said this! That’s what I did. With 1/4 round stock it looks seamless.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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splintergroup

3430 posts in 1898 days


#10 posted 11-17-2019 03:45 PM

Those kind of issues make my head hurt! Glad you’ve found a solution, the end effect will look super!

If the trim is stained darker, you can do as you thought, stain the trim, install then stain the entire piece. If the trim is lighter, you obviously need to stain the large areas first, but make sure whatever glue you use will stick well to the stained surfaces.

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bilyo

1039 posts in 1778 days


#11 posted 11-17-2019 06:33 PM


+100 I was finishing my beer when you said this! That s what I did. With 1/4 round stock it looks seamless.

- Andybb


Was it the beer or good workmanship that made it “look” so good? ;>)

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TungOil

1379 posts in 1170 days


#12 posted 11-17-2019 09:56 PM

I would cope that joint. Cut the first piece full length, then cut a 35 deg. Miter on the piece you want to cope. As long as you match the angle as it you were mitering both pieces, you can follow the edge of the cut with a coping saw and get a perfect cope. Back cut slightly and you will get a nice tight joint. It’s the same technique used by trim carpenters (good ones anyway).

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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