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strop leather

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Forum topic by Karda posted 11-15-2019 07:19 AM 890 views 0 times favorited 43 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1827 posts in 1114 days


11-15-2019 07:19 AM

ineed a newe strop, I am using ans old belt and it getting cut and falling apart. i want to get some leather, but all that i am looking at is graded by ounces. i want a thick firm leather not soft what do i want thanks mike


43 replies so far

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CaptainKlutz

2029 posts in 2055 days


#1 posted 11-15-2019 08:14 AM

Can use most any leather for strop? Thicker heavier leather lasts longer. Plain vegetable tanned leather is cheaper, and doesn’t have any dies in it. Dyed leathers can stain your hands, surfaces when it gets wet, so I avoid it.

I prefer ‘sole’ or ‘sole bend’ cuts on hide, that are 10+oz weights, or ~8+mm thick. Challenge with thick sole leather is cost? Hide can be split into several thinner layers, so thickest hides tend to be most expensive. 8-10oz leather as usually been split once from a thicker hide, so it’s cheaper and more readily available than 12-16oz.

If you are new to leather, one good place to get leather is: Tandy Leather.
https://www.tandyleather.com/en/leather-buying-guide.html
Buying leather online can be gamble, especially of don’t know what you want.
Easy way to leather, and an education is to find a local Tandy store location, and visit the remnants/2nds bin in store. The 2nds cost half of virgin/good stuff. Can usually find a hunk of sole leather cheap, as it has hole in middle, and is only good for making small stuff – like a strop!

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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Brit

7869 posts in 3403 days


#2 posted 11-15-2019 08:43 AM

I agree with you Karda that hard leather is best, but in my opinion you don’t want it too thick otherwise it will depress too much when you strop chisels. I’ve tried quite a few leather types and thicknesses and recently I purchased some Horse Butt leather strops from Tools for Working Wood. I use one rough side up with some stropping paste on it and one smooth side up with no stropping paste on it. I stuck them to hardwood bases with double-sided tape. They are much better than anything else I’ve tried.

-- Andy - Old Chinese proverb says: "If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it."

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weedeater64

37 posts in 571 days


#3 posted 11-15-2019 12:16 PM

Soak a doggie rawhide, unroll it and nail it to a block of wood.

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ChefHDAN

1489 posts in 3410 days


#4 posted 11-15-2019 01:04 PM

I had an old Everlast weightlifting belt, that had shrunk and would not fit around me anymore :-), cut it up and glued a nice size piece to a board, works very well.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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HokieKen

11522 posts in 1699 days


#5 posted 11-15-2019 01:23 PM

I used to use the thick stuff too. But, earlier this year, I noticed when looking at my edges on my carving tools that the they were getting dubbed. My carving tools are maintained solely on a leather strop so I finally found that my leather was too thick and deformed too much. I got a piece of really thin (~1/32”) leather and attached it to a piece of MDF with spray adhesive and my rolled edges went away. On the other hand, the thicker leather has always worked well for me for chisels and plane irons. Probably because they also touch stones or abrasives pretty regularly.

YMMV of course…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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mpounders

940 posts in 3456 days


#6 posted 11-15-2019 02:18 PM

A lot of carvers are using thinner material now a days, to prevent rolling the edge. Materials like pig skin or even cardboard. Many use cardboard from file folders or cereal boxes glued to mdf or plywood. They are flat, inexpensive, and easy to replace. Just a suggestion that doesn’t cost anything to try.

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

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ChefHDAN

1489 posts in 3410 days


#7 posted 11-15-2019 06:18 PM

Hokie, thanks for the advice, I am in AWE of those that can carve, one day I may try but my only stropping is for my planes and bench chisels

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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HokieKen

11522 posts in 1699 days


#8 posted 11-15-2019 06:21 PM

I can’t carve ChefHDAN but I enjoy whittling away at wood sometimes and occasionally end up with a bauble my grandkids like ;-) Have a look at Mike’s ^^ (mpounders) projects if you want to see some real carving!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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therealSteveN

4312 posts in 1135 days


#9 posted 11-15-2019 06:56 PM

A lot of the ones I see aren’t much wider than your belt. So if you are doing anything wider I’d suggest a wider piece of Leather than the standard 1” 1 1/2” stuff you usually see.

This guy sells a 3” x 8”, it’s pretty good leather and he throws in a charge of green. 11 bux, free ship.

Link

-- Think safe, be safe

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Phil32

721 posts in 464 days


#10 posted 11-15-2019 07:14 PM



A lot of carvers are using thinner material now a days, to prevent rolling the edge. Materials like pig skin or even cardboard. Many use cardboard from file folders or cereal boxes glued to mdf or plywood. They are flat, inexpensive, and easy to replace. Just a suggestion that doesn t cost anything to try.

- mpounders


As a woodcarver, I no longer use a leather strop, only thin cardboard. You are welcome to check my Projects to see what sharp tools can produce.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit! Likewise with woodworkers.

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Karda

1827 posts in 1114 days


#11 posted 11-15-2019 10:52 PM

tell me about the card board. i used I tried it but the cardboard loaded up with black very fast but produced a fine edge before it got loaded with steel. how many strps do you needI use thee brown then red then yellow

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Phil32

721 posts in 464 days


#12 posted 11-16-2019 12:22 AM

I use the cardboard from a cereal box with green compound – the same piece for many weeks. Do not worry about the buildup of black until it loses effectiveness. Typically a touch-up of an edge requires only 6-8 passes.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit! Likewise with woodworkers.

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Karda

1827 posts in 1114 days


#13 posted 11-16-2019 01:34 AM

ok i use flexcut gold is that good

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SMP

1447 posts in 466 days


#14 posted 11-16-2019 04:26 AM

I bought the 3” wide strop leather from amazon, think it was $4, green compound from HF for $5, glued it to a scrap of plywood and works perfectly for about $10 and wide enough even for my bigger plane irons.

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BurlyBob

6762 posts in 2826 days


#15 posted 11-16-2019 04:28 AM

Like Capt. Said Tandy leather. If you got one of their stores near you they often have a scrape barrel you can sort thru.

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