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Wood filler after teak oil?

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Forum topic by Travis posted 11-13-2019 05:56 AM 352 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Travis

349 posts in 328 days


11-13-2019 05:56 AM

Hey guys,

Quick question here. I just finished a wood planter that I’m quite proud of. It is white oak for durability, coated in Watco Teak Oil to give it a little extra help. Today I put the plastic liner in to further protect the wood from constant exposure to wet soil. Everything I looked at said to staple the liner. Immediately after I did that I began to panic. I realized most people doing this are using common pine and not expecting to get years out of their planter. I just introduced holes into my wood (granted, they are above the soil level). Also, I have no idea if those staples are weatherproof but I highly doubt it. In my mind are visions of rotting, rusting planter, all because of those staples. So I wanted to pull the staples out and let the weight of the soil keep the liner in place. But then I thought, what about those wonderful holes from the staples? I could put some wood filler over them to plug them up, but I’m not sure if the teak oil will interfere with the wood filler and prevent it from binding.

Should I leave the staples in, or pull them out? If I pull them out, what can sufficiently plug the holes given the Teak Oil finish?

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.


19 replies so far

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

360 posts in 3829 days


#1 posted 11-13-2019 09:53 AM

I can recommend Mohawk fill sticks. In the basic sense, it’s colored wax:
https://www.mohawk-finishing.com/products/wood-touch-up-repair/fillers/fil-stik-putty-sticks/

You use these kind of like an eraser. Just rub over the staple hole until it is filled with wax. Then use a soft cloth to remove the excess.

That’s the easiest way out, and will hide the holes nicely if you can find the right color match.

I don’t know if a wood putty would work, I wouldn’t use it. I do a lot of trim work in my house, nailed on by hand with 8D (= pretty beefy) nails, and fill all the holes with Mohawk fill sticks. The trim is finished with linseed oil and shellac. Previous attempts to fill the holes with wood putty etc. did not turned out very well.

I don’t know how many staple holes you have to fill… but maybe you are a bit over-ambitious? Just wondering… if it’s just a couple of small holes, I don’t think anyone will notice, and I doubt it will disturb the integrity of your planter. They look very nice by the way, the finish turned out well!

View Travis's profile

Travis

349 posts in 328 days


#2 posted 11-13-2019 12:52 PM



I can recommend Mohawk fill sticks. In the basic sense, it s colored wax:
https://www.mohawk-finishing.com/products/wood-touch-up-repair/fillers/fil-stik-putty-sticks/

You use these kind of like an eraser. Just rub over the staple hole until it is filled with wax. Then use a soft cloth to remove the excess.

That s the easiest way out, and will hide the holes nicely if you can find the right color match.

I don t know if a wood putty would work, I wouldn t use it. I do a lot of trim work in my house, nailed on by hand with 8D (= pretty beefy) nails, and fill all the holes with Mohawk fill sticks. The trim is finished with linseed oil and shellac. Previous attempts to fill the holes with wood putty etc. did not turned out very well.

I don t know how many staple holes you have to fill… but maybe you are a bit over-ambitious? Just wondering… if it s just a couple of small holes, I don t think anyone will notice, and I doubt it will disturb the integrity of your planter. They look very nice by the way, the finish turned out well!

- DrTebi

Thank you for the idea! I have seen those at my lumber supplier but have never used them before. Sounds like a great solution. I did not get zealots with the staples, there are only a few so it should not be a big job.

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5570 posts in 2913 days


#3 posted 11-13-2019 12:55 PM

The staples left in will discolor the oak. Oak + iron + moisture, will always leave black discoloration. It will be on the inside so it won’t be visible, but if that bothers you I would just remove the staples, then put a little more teak oil over the holes.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5837 posts in 3055 days


#4 posted 11-13-2019 01:16 PM

Yep, the staples will rust and discolor the wood…but that wood won’t rot. It’s white oak, very common to use it in outdoor applications for it’s durability. Pull the staple and don’t worry about it. For the record, there’s no such thing as Teak Oil, and whatever it is it may not be very weather resistant. Check this article.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Travis's profile

Travis

349 posts in 328 days


#5 posted 11-13-2019 02:59 PM



The staples left in will discolor the oak. Oak + iron + moisture, will always leave black discoloration. It will be on the inside so it won t be visible, but if that bothers you I would just remove the staples, then put a little more teak oil over the holes.

- bondogaposis

Thanks Bondo!

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View Travis's profile

Travis

349 posts in 328 days


#6 posted 11-13-2019 03:03 PM



Yep, the staples will rust and discolor the wood…but that wood won t rot. It s white oak, very common to use it in outdoor applications for it s durability. Pull the staple and don t worry about it. For the record, there s no such thing as Teak Oil, and whatever it is it may not be very weather resistant. Check this article.

- Fred Hargis

Thanks Fred, that’s very reassuring. I picked white oak specifically for its durability, but I wasn’t sure if that was still applicable after I put some small holes in the wood ;)

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1454 posts in 467 days


#7 posted 11-13-2019 03:53 PM

I’ve found that when you line planters with plastic sheeting, water gets under it and stats there longer, so from a rotting perspective you are kind of screwed either way. Now in this case you used white oak so i wouldn’t worry about it. But when i use pine or construction lumber like fir for cheap planters i have started spraying the inside with that rubberized undercoating. I’ve had planters that have deteriorated over several years and the inside still looks like the day i sprayed it.

View Travis's profile

Travis

349 posts in 328 days


#8 posted 11-13-2019 04:29 PM



I’ve found that when you line planters with plastic sheeting, water gets under it and stats there longer, so from a rotting perspective you are kind of screwed either way. Now in this case you used white oak so i wouldn’t worry about it. But when i use pine or construction lumber like fir for cheap planters i have started spraying the inside with that rubberized undercoating. I’ve had planters that have deteriorated over several years and the inside still looks like the day i sprayed it.

- SMP

I’ve heard that water likes to condense under the plastic liner. I debated about which would be worse and figured the condensation would probably be better than moist soil 24/7, especially since I live in Phoenix and we tend to have pretty dry air ;). That said, I anticipate there will be moisture collecting under there and I’m counting on the oak to hold it off. I used a slotted bottom design instead of a solid bottom with drilled drainage holes, thinking that might allow a little more airflow under the plastic liner (crossing fingers).

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2531 posts in 3506 days


#9 posted 11-14-2019 05:26 AM

You could use a mastic too. That stuff can be pretty bullet proof. Especially since the liner does all the heavy lifting.

As to putty, it should work, since your “Teak Oil” is just thinned poly, so should be hard and would not compromise adhesion, like actual oil would.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

910 posts in 1664 days


#10 posted 11-14-2019 04:06 PM

I think someone above suggested pulling the staples and leaving the holes. I think this would be fine. However, if you would rather have the holes filled, whittle some “toothpicks” and tap them into the holes with some gel super glue, let them cure, and shave them off with a sharp chisel. Done.

View JackDuren's profile

JackDuren

544 posts in 1521 days


#11 posted 11-14-2019 04:19 PM

Getting the staple out could leave a very noticeable hole. You could set the nail/ staple deep enough and not notice for years depending on exposer. ..

View Travis's profile

Travis

349 posts in 328 days


#12 posted 11-14-2019 07:41 PM



I think someone above suggested pulling the staples and leaving the holes. I think this would be fine. However, if you would rather have the holes filled, whittle some “toothpicks” and tap them into the holes with some gel super glue, let them cure, and shave them off with a sharp chisel. Done.

- bilyo

That’s a great idea! I might give this a try.

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View Travis's profile

Travis

349 posts in 328 days


#13 posted 11-14-2019 07:44 PM

So I pulled the staples out last night and put the plant in it. I just left the holes because I wanted to get the plant in and figured I could fill the holes at any future date without issue. There was one staple that I couldn’t fully remove because it broke in the wood and didn’t leave a long enough stub for me to grab with pliers. this morning, there was a decent black spot there. I didn’t realize the discoloration would occur so soon! I might try a bit more valiantly later today to get the remaining stub out and sand away the discoloration.

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

View BalsaWood's profile

BalsaWood

170 posts in 1720 days


#14 posted 11-14-2019 10:09 PM

I’ve used Elmer’s wood filler before over oil finishes and have not had any issues with it for years. There is an outdoor and indoor version of their wood fillers.

View Travis's profile

Travis

349 posts in 328 days


#15 posted 11-14-2019 10:38 PM



I ve used Elmer s wood filler before over oil finishes and have not had any issues with it for years. There is an outdoor and indoor version of their wood fillers.

- BalsaWood

Good to know! I’ve only tried the Tite Bonds. Might be time for me to expand my horizons a bit :)

-- The plan is wrong; my finished piece is right.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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