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Chop (miter) saw - keep, store or sell?

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Forum topic by controlfreak posted 11-11-2019 02:54 PM 504 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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controlfreak

353 posts in 169 days


11-11-2019 02:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: miter saw

It is getting colder and becoming more difficult to keep moving my table saw and miter saw out into the yard to work. Chop saw is on a rolling stand that takes up too much room. It seems that every move I make I knock something over and got to my last straw this weekend. I was in a hurry and only moved my table saw out and when I went to my bandsaw to make some cuts I stepped on a rake which smacked me in the face. If I wasn’t so pissed off it would have made a good comedy routine.

After getting a new miter gauge I have grown more confident of the new gauge and my crosscut sled. So I am thinking of getting my miter saw out of the way. To those without a chop saw or other small shop folks. what do you do with long boards?

Do you rough trim with a circular saw or hand saw and then do your final cut on the table saw?


19 replies so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

3075 posts in 1790 days


#1 posted 11-11-2019 03:07 PM

My miter saw is routinely used to chop long boards to rough protect length. Beyond that, not so much. It dies take up a lot of space, especially with the required work area to each side of the blade. Even then, I often need to use my jig saw for 12 footers or go outside with a circular saw.

It sounds like you can do without the easy access to your miter saw, perhaps store it and repurpose/lose the rolling stand to recover the workroom. I’d be hesitant to get rid of the saw since they are really handy when you need them 8^)

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1363 posts in 1476 days


#2 posted 11-11-2019 04:58 PM

I’d get rid of the rake and keep the saw.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

930 posts in 2152 days


#3 posted 11-11-2019 06:49 PM

First, I presume you are calling the saw a chop saw or miter saw interchangeably, and it is really just one saw.

Then, I have been very happy with a dewalt 12” miter saw that literally sits on the floor out of the way. To use it I set it up on sawhorses, or a B&D Workmate (I love having that old bench/clamoing device!)

It is so handy this way that i have not ever thought of selling that old saw – for what would be a modest amount of cash.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

353 posts in 169 days


#4 posted 11-11-2019 07:20 PM

It is a chop AKA miter saw but it is not a sliding style saw. I haven’t thought about getting rid of the jobsite rolling base but I don’t know if I am going to like picking up that Hitachi and setting it up minus the outriggers the rolling cart has to support work. It also adds a level of setup to make a cut. I think I will miss the convenience of being able to set stop blocks on longer pieces but there are always other ways to do this. I think the only way to resolve this is to store it and see how it goes for awhile.

View ocean's profile

ocean

193 posts in 1401 days


#5 posted 11-11-2019 07:47 PM

Do you have room for a flip cart. If so you can keep the chop saw and even mount a second small tool to the other side. I also don’t have much room and the flip cart was the answer. I have a thickness planer one side and the chop saw the other. While I don’t the chop saw much, it is convenient to have both but not have to lift the tool off the floor to a table for use.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View pottz's profile

pottz

7175 posts in 1552 days


#6 posted 11-11-2019 08:01 PM

i only use my miter saw for angle cuts mostly i use a radial arm saw for cutting boards to length but even if you dont use it much i wouldn’t get rid of it,as soon as you did you would need it and regret it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

353 posts in 169 days


#7 posted 11-11-2019 08:14 PM

A flip cart may work for chop & planner and that would free up the planner stand for my drill press. They are comparable in size and weight so it would be a good pairing for a flipkart, I like it.

My planner stand is an old Craftsman TS stand that I found while running at 5am. No doubt that people that saw me running with that thing said WTF?

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1363 posts in 1476 days


#8 posted 11-11-2019 08:20 PM

My experience has always been that any time I sell, toss or give away anything that has been collecting dust I’ll find a reason to need the very damn thing that I no longer have. YMMV.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

353 posts in 169 days


#9 posted 11-11-2019 08:39 PM

I agree Ripper. I was planning on taking it to my office which is only 15 minutes away to test if I can go without. I must admit that I wish I had gotten a sliding type saw if I were to do over again but then there is that whole distance to wall thing that won’t work in my favor either.

View builtinbkyn's profile

builtinbkyn

2982 posts in 1508 days


#10 posted 11-11-2019 08:42 PM

I’d get rid of mine but the work station houses a lot of other materials in the cabinets below. I only use it to break down long pieces to project length as splinter mentioned. Could easily accomplish the same with a handheld saw – powered by electric or not. As far as I’m concerned, a miter/chop saw earns its keep in carpentry/framing and not really in woodworking. I know others have a different opinion.

OP break down your saw station and stow the saw in the back of a closet for other household work you may have in the future. Use your rollaway for something else or make it kindling. Do your cuts by hand. You’ll get better and gain skill. Cuts that demand absolute accuracy can be done on a sled or with a miter gauge on your TS as you suggested, as long as they’re not too long/heavy and/or you can accommodate them in some way.

I’m looking at thinning out my shop so I can actually enjoy working in it again. Stumbling around tools and equipment isn’t fun or safe.

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5844 posts in 3061 days


#11 posted 11-11-2019 08:45 PM

I don’t even consider the miter saw a shop tool, mine stays in storage waiting for a home improvement project.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

930 posts in 2152 days


#12 posted 11-11-2019 11:23 PM

I don t even consider the miter saw a shop tool, mine stays in storage waiting for a home improvement project.
- Fred Hargis

Fred, I have a fair amount of money in my current, top-end, compound miter saw – but I mostly agree. It isn’t all that useful to me on a regular basis. It really depends on how you intend to use it, what projects you commonly undertake.

But now I am curious, do you have a radial arm set up in your shop, or do you just use a circular saw to cross-cut long boards? Ultimately, that is the question about how much space to allocate to a RAS or a miter saw: How do you manage cross cuts on long boards, when you need to do that?

.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4348 posts in 1142 days


#13 posted 11-12-2019 04:11 AM

I usually have mine on a rolling stand, and bring it to the overhead garage door if I need to cut down stock coming in, for either use right then, or storage.

For woodworking I use a sled on the table saw for cutting to final length.

In your case I’d see how much money you could get selling it off, and buy one of those rapid cut handsaws, or heck even a track saw, or circular saw if you feel the need for power. Loping off the long boards by hand is great exercise, and even though you don’t need accuracy for rough cuts, it’s good hand saw practice for other cuts

-- Think safe, be safe

View Woodbum's profile

Woodbum

898 posts in 3633 days


#14 posted 11-12-2019 11:23 AM

Hard for me to fathom how a self described “controlfreak” could leave a rake, tines up, in the footpath of a woodworking area. To echo what was said before, lose the rake (how about hanging it on the wall ?). If you need the saw, keep it. If not get rid of it. I can’t think of a simpler solution. But then again, I could be wrong.

-- "Now I'm just another old guy wearing funny clothes"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5844 posts in 3061 days


#15 posted 11-12-2019 11:31 AM


But now I am curious, do you have a radial arm set up in your shop, or do you just use a circular saw to cross-cut long boards? Ultimately, that is the question about how much space to allocate to a RAS or a miter saw: How do you manage cross cuts on long boards, when you need to do that?

.

- jimintx

I do have an RAS, and my shop will not be without one. Mine is an older Dewalt, and it is dead nuts accurate on miter and crosscuts.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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