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Forum topic by Karda posted 11-11-2019 05:10 AM 557 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1843 posts in 1119 days


11-11-2019 05:10 AM

Hi, i have a work table built of angle iron and plywood. I can’t build another one because one end houses my wood lathe. i can’t have a good vice because of the angle iron frame. Is there a way to add a short extension to the table that would support a vice. I would like to have a wood vice on one corner and a machinist vice on the other, not big one but not little. thanks mike.


21 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1078 posts in 3359 days


#1 posted 11-11-2019 10:01 AM

You have a vice: Woodworking. If you need to add a vise, just buy more of the same steel the bench is framed with and add an extension. The holes will line up so add what you have room for. Either two more legs, or angled braces to the existing legs.

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Karda

1843 posts in 1119 days


#2 posted 11-11-2019 10:11 AM

here is my vice a piece of junk, also i have knoiw idea where to get metal like that. besides the metal frame is why I can’t mount a vice on that table

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

2088 posts in 728 days


#3 posted 11-11-2019 01:11 PM

Mike – if you don’t use the machinist’s vice often, you can
make a base for it and store it out of the way when it is not used.
(the vice I use the most is on a small table outside in the carport).

.

my Box Stores carry the slotted angle iron in the hardware section in the metal bin.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Mr_Pink's profile

Mr_Pink

177 posts in 937 days


#4 posted 11-11-2019 01:27 PM

Depending on what you intend to use a vice for, you could make a removable vice that sits on top of the bench, like a Moxon vice.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

114 posts in 163 days


#5 posted 11-11-2019 02:53 PM

Why can’t you just bolt or screw wood to the outside of the metal legs? Just put washers on that are larger than the holes in the metal.

You could build whatever you wanted on the end….

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5571 posts in 2917 days


#6 posted 11-11-2019 03:11 PM

Take the top off and build another longer top.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4213 posts in 1953 days


#7 posted 11-11-2019 03:14 PM

The first thing I would do is make the top of your bench larger and thicker. If you have at least 2 inch overhang, it opens up all kinds of options because you can clamp things to the top, including a moxon vise or even a a machinist’s vise. mounted on a board. Check out this topic for some ideas for building a vise you can mount on top of your bench. Of course this all assumes that your bench is heavy and stable enough for the sort of work that you use a vise for. If the bench moves or sways, it might be better to start by building a new bench that will also be a better base for vises.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

899 posts in 3065 days


#8 posted 11-11-2019 04:42 PM

As Ibewjon 1st suggestion:
what about making something like this (not necessarily with a leg vise).
It is bolted to an existing table.

And for the machinist vice as John Smith suggest

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View Karda's profile

Karda

1843 posts in 1119 days


#9 posted 11-12-2019 04:52 AM

thanks for the suggestions, gives me a lot of ideas. I like Sylvains it what I am looking for but small 2’ x 3’. I would love a top like that but I don’t have the need clamps or a planer to smooth the top

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Sylvain

899 posts in 3065 days


#10 posted 11-12-2019 10:07 AM

Laminating and flattening a bench-top might seems intimidating but just do it. I had practically no experience with a bench plane when I made my workbench. After a lot of procrastination, I have done it. It is not that difficult.
If you have no experience with hand tools, look at the videos of Paul Sellers.
In particular the workbench ones.
The bench-top making

If you have no clamps, you can glue two boards using screws as clamps. When the glue is dry, remove the screws, glue another board and screw it and so on. Repeat the process until you have the desired width.
Don’t spend too much time trying to get a perfect flat top. It will probably move a little bit the first year (depending of the dryness of the wood used.) Perfect your planing skills on other boards during that year.

Screws as clamp in this video
starting at about 13’.

To avoid chopping mortises for the legs, use the technique shown here.
last picture
and here first picture.
also explained here although the wedges are not mandatory.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1078 posts in 3359 days


#11 posted 11-12-2019 10:15 AM

Work bench tops and butcher block cabinet tops are available at the big boxes and woodcraft and tickler. In oak and maple. Get the proper size and attach it to the top of your bench with the needed overhang all around. Just another option.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5787 posts in 3809 days


#12 posted 11-12-2019 06:41 PM

I have built many benches and never worried about getting it perfectly flat. To me, a bench will be pounded on, screws and nails driven into. If you want a flat surface for assembly jobs, that is a different story. A bench is not a piece of furniture; it takes a beating. There are benches that cost high 3 figure prices. Why anyone would want to have such a bench is beyond me. It’s like a new car and the first scratch it gets. A bench will get it’s share of scratches and worse if it is being used. Typically, I will build a bench and it will last for 10 or more years. When it’s all torn up, I will either replace the top or build a new one.

View Karda's profile

Karda

1843 posts in 1119 days


#13 posted 11-13-2019 12:38 AM

i watched the screws for clamps video thats the way I’ll go.Is skid wood good for bench tops. This one will be a 2×3 foot add on to the bench pictured could i use skid rails for the top, or would 2×4s be better thanks

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

899 posts in 3065 days


#14 posted 11-13-2019 02:25 PM

I don’t know what “perfectly” flat would be for a workbench.
Seeing what Bandit571 was able to build with his “one afternoon workbench” helped me stopping procrastination about making a workbench. This bandit571 workbench has been flattened initially. I don’t think it has been re-flattened ever since.

And many Paul Sellers blogs show a well beaten top. Nice blog about this subject.

That being said, verifying if something rocks on the workbench top gives a quick indication if the piece is (probably) twisted or not. “probably” because the indication will never be better than the bench-top quality. For better measure I use winding sticks.
I don’t know how really flat my bench-top is. I just used winding sticks and an inexpensive (cheap?) 1 m long aluminium rule to feel if it it was dragging equally everywhere without “helicoptering”.

To answer Karda’s question.
Skid wood would be perfectly OK; I made my workbench with recycled wood.
You will have to eliminate the high spots and to smooth the faces which will receive the glue before gluing.
(see “The bench-top making” link here-above). Skid wood being thin than 2X4, it means a little more work to achieve the same bench-top depth. (but you can use shorter screws as clamp).

Note that a one foot depth workbench-top is enough for most of the work and your existing table will provide additional support if needed. Having a wider bench-top is of course a matter of personal preference.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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Karda

1843 posts in 1119 days


#15 posted 11-14-2019 12:04 AM

what I am looking for is about 16” x 36” with a vice on one end. i have found some utubes that make a similar bench, however they are bench top benches. How would i put legs under a bench like this, I could bolt 2 legs to my iron bench frame for stability. here are 2 link to videos making what i think I want. This is a Lumberjocks project and about the size I need but how to attach it to the metal legs, I am a crapy designer

https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/106379

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