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What specialty screws or what else should I use to make this router table adjustable (height wise)

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 11-08-2019 01:14 AM 1481 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


11-08-2019 01:14 AM

Hi guys

I am trying to install a router table on a Ridgig TS 3650 table saw as below
I sorted out the problem of attaching the brackets to the fence rails
I am now trying to find a solution to make it possible to adjust the router table with screws like below

and here is my solution

Can you think of a better one or of the flaws of this one ?


22 replies so far

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1238 posts in 2075 days


#1 posted 11-08-2019 05:26 AM

Add one more nut to tighten against the table and I think you’re good to go. Just accounting for the slop in the screw threads that could make the table move up and down ever so slightly.

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MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


#2 posted 11-08-2019 06:04 AM

The only flaw in this design is that if you tighten the nuts against that bracket there is no way to adjust the height easily, I was hoping there are nicer solutions to this problem

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

279 posts in 137 days


#3 posted 11-08-2019 11:43 AM

I need to do something similar so I will be watching this thread. What are you making the top out of?

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


#4 posted 11-08-2019 11:54 AM

It will be me!amine for now. I know it chips and it gets scratches easily but It will be easy to replace and cheap. Later on when I will be more skilled I will use a more durable board like I have seen done by more advanced wood workers

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

80 posts in 132 days


#5 posted 11-08-2019 01:54 PM

What if you made your bracket threaded (fasten a nut to the bracket?) and forgo the t-nut? Also, move your ‘lock nut’ to the bottom side as well.

Then, you can turn the big handle below the bracket to adjust height, and tighten the locknut from below as well.

I found that the Bosch table top router table’s table fit between the fence rails of my Shop Fox saw…. It’s made out fo aluminum and has worked out quite well. I owned the router table before I bought this saw, and it was just a happy accident that they were the same size (at least, I think it was).

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View 4wood's profile

4wood

38 posts in 489 days


#6 posted 11-08-2019 02:13 PM

The top nut must be fastened to the bracket in order to make the adjustment. If the bracket is thick enough you could tap some threads in it and eliminate the top nut and use the bottom nut to secure the adjustment. Welding or adhering the nut to the top of the bracket would also work. Another method would be to cut a piece of plywood the size of the bracket bottom fasten it with screws to the bracket and install a T-Nut in it. Keep the bottom nut on the adjuster and tighten it after the adjustment is made.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


#7 posted 11-08-2019 02:47 PM



What if you made your bracket threaded (fasten a nut to the bracket?) and forgo the t-nut? Also, move your lock nut to the bottom side as well.

Then, you can turn the big handle below the bracket to adjust height, and tighten the locknut from below as well.

I found that the Bosch table top router table s table fit between the fence rails of my Shop Fox saw…. It s made out fo aluminum and has worked out quite well. I owned the router table before I bought this saw, and it was just a happy accident that they were the same size (at least, I think it was).

- Axis39


Re your router table: I have a mastercraft one, I will reuse the fence and the plate
if too heavy (all metal) it might bend the rails when I am trying to avoid.
Aluminium is lighter though

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

279 posts in 137 days


#8 posted 11-08-2019 03:13 PM

MiniMe,

Me!amine is likely my go to as well. Do your fence rails slide or are they fixed? On my Kobalt TS they slide so I was trying to find a way to drop the router table into the gap only during use and remove when not. Due to space limitations I need to fold up my table saw when not using and often only use it outside.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1923 days


#9 posted 11-08-2019 03:19 PM

I am not clear about the design. Is the T-nut going to be imbedded in the top? It seems to me like you have multiple things going on here or I just don’t understand. Are you planning to turn the bolt, just the nuts or both? If the nut on the bracket is attached or the bracket is threaded as mentioned above, it seems to me that the bolt will just spin in the T-nut until it bottoms out without adjusting the height? If you use thread-loc or epoxy the bolt to the T-nut, you could turn the nut but with the nut being on the top of the bracket, it will be hard to get to and a PITA to adjust.

In order to make this design work, I think that the nuts on the top and bottom of the brackets need to be locked in place on the bolt with thread-loc and/or jam-nuts so that the bolt can spin without moving up and down relative to the bracket. They need to be tight enough against the bracket to prevent movement up and down but loose enough so it can turn. Then when you turn the bolt from the bottom, it will turn in the T-nut and move the table up and down. Maybe that is what you were thinking?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


#10 posted 11-08-2019 03:33 PM



What if you made your bracket threaded (fasten a nut to the bracket?) and forgo the t-nut? Also, move your lock nut to the bottom side as well.

Then, you can turn the big handle below the bracket to adjust height, and tighten the locknut from below as well.

- Axis39


Not enough meat in the bracket to thread it
Not sure how I can fasten that
I need the end of the screw to be attached to the router table body otherwise the board will move


The top nut must be fastened to the bracket in order to make the adjustment. If the bracket is thick enough you could tap some threads in it and eliminate the top nut and use the bottom nut to secure the adjustment. Welding or adhering the nut to the top of the bracket would also work.

See the above answer
Another method would be to cut a piece of plywood the size of the bracket bottom fasten it with screws to the bracket and install a T-Nut in it. Keep the bottom nut on the adjuster and tighten it after the adjustment is made.

- 4wood


this is what I am considering, run two traversal pieces of (ply)wood or metal and screw then to the brackets.
That will reinforce everything and keep them level with the opposite braket
Then do what you said like below

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

4080 posts in 1923 days


#11 posted 11-08-2019 03:49 PM

As long as the nut is pinned or glued to the bolt and not the top, that will work to adjust the height. Are you going to make sure that the top is trapped between the top of the bolt and the nut so that you are not just relying on gravity to hold it down?

EDIT: I don’t know why I noticed this and not that it matters but you used a left handed threaded bolt for your diagram. :-)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


#12 posted 11-08-2019 04:04 PM

that was just a random screw from the 3D warehouse
The bracket is screwed to the brown strip of wood
The T-nut insert is installed in the same strip
the top board is the router table which will be indeed squeezed between the square nut and the head of the bolt
When I need to adjust it I release the square nut and I screw the bolt in or out as needed to bring the square nut and the router table in that corner where I need it to be

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


#13 posted 11-08-2019 04:54 PM

Ideally I should find a screw like this , but longer and with finer thread, the finer the better but here the T-Nut insert will limit my options

View xeddog's profile

xeddog

257 posts in 3543 days


#14 posted 11-09-2019 06:34 PM

I am still not understanding why you need vertical adjustment in the first place. Why not just shim it and lock it down?

Wayne

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

140 posts in 587 days


#15 posted 11-09-2019 08:37 PM



I am still not understanding why you need vertical adjustment in the first place. Why not just shim it and lock it down?

Wayne

- xeddog


I am not very confident in the way it will sit level with the cast iron table of the saw on long term
I suspect that the screws I use to attach this to the rails will have some play and they might allow the brackets to move downard after all is let say shimmed as you indicated. Then I will have to shim it again
Besides that the table will be a consumable -cheap melamine easier to replace this way. I might just do what you said as well, I will see how it all comes together

showing 1 through 15 of 22 replies

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