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How to fill a large hole

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Forum topic by notdan posted 11-03-2019 12:35 PM 441 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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notdan

30 posts in 1918 days


11-03-2019 12:35 PM

I’m building a speaker cabinet out of a bee box I bought. The bee box has handles carved out of them that I need to fill flat. It will then be wrapped with tweed so what the filled part looks like doesn’t matter, The main thing is it can never rattle it it will sound terrible in the cabinet (that will have a lot of vibration) and it needs to be flush or sanded flush once filled. Was thinking I could chisel our square and glue a board in it. Or if it’s just as good and easier fill it with something like bondo or liquid nails or something. But don’t want it to vibrate loose in 5 yrs. pict if what I’m talking about below. Thoughts?


19 replies so far

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

429 posts in 83 days


#1 posted 11-03-2019 01:12 PM

2 part epoxy beefed up with sawdust could work

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

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Nubsnstubs

1625 posts in 2265 days


#2 posted 11-03-2019 02:43 PM

Take the box apart, and reassemble with the handle inside….............. Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1373 posts in 2488 days


#3 posted 11-03-2019 02:47 PM

Any of the suggestions (including your own) should work.

I just thought it was funny that there have been several threads here discussing how to make handles just like that and now you want to fill them up!

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splintergroup

2988 posts in 1758 days


#4 posted 11-03-2019 02:57 PM

There are plenty of holes out there if someone would just take the dirt out of them 8^)

My solution would be to fit a piece of wood/whatever to take up most of the recess volume then fill with epoxy or other material that can flow into the gaps.

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

331 posts in 262 days


#5 posted 11-03-2019 03:07 PM

I would buy some 1/2” mdf and wrap a layer around the whole box.

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a1Jim

117743 posts in 4112 days


#6 posted 11-03-2019 04:13 PM

If you have a router you can either just use a rectangle shape or make a decorative pattern to cover the pockets and in your sides, you don’t need to make it very deep, say a 1/8” give or take, trace the pattern and then route out the shape and clean up with a chisel glue in place. a decorative pattern will look like it was a design element but may take longer to route out and make the inlay were a simple rectangle will be easier, what tools you have may make the difference. Here are a couple of links to show what I mean, the 1st one is the very basic way to inlay with minimal tools and the second shows the use of a specialized router kit to help speed the process along especially if you want a more detailed inlay.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXYC3OGOC5U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMw37oy6mvI

https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

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LeeRoyMan

331 posts in 262 days


#7 posted 11-03-2019 04:18 PM


If you have a router you can either just use a rectangle shape or make a decorative pattern

- a1Jim

“It will then be wrapped with tweed so what the filled part looks like doesn’t matter”
.
.
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I’m not a speaker expert, by any means, but I figured wrapping them with mdf would give them better sound at the same time. Probably even less work than trying to fill them. (If you have a saw and some glue that is)

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a1Jim

117743 posts in 4112 days


#8 posted 11-03-2019 04:34 PM

“It will then be wrapped with tweed so what the filled part looks like doesn’t matter”

Not quite sure what that means LeeRoy but there are lots of ways this can be done to hide them I offer two ways one would look like a patch and the other could be a very decorative element depending on what notdan wants to do.

https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

331 posts in 262 days


#9 posted 11-03-2019 04:37 PM


“It will then be wrapped with tweed so what the filled part looks like doesn’t matter”

Not quite sure what that means LeeRoy but there are lots of ways this can be done to hide them I offer two ways one would look like a patch and the other could be a very decorative element depending on what notdan wants to do.

https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

- a1Jim


That is what he said in his original post. He is covering it.

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a1Jim

117743 posts in 4112 days


#10 posted 11-03-2019 04:45 PM

I see that now sorry, another old guy brain attack haha Your right it won’t need inlay. Maybe someone else will benefit from the info.

https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

331 posts in 262 days


#11 posted 11-03-2019 04:48 PM

Maybe someone else will benefit from the info.

https://www.artisticwoodstudio.com/videos

- a1Jim

For sure!

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

512 posts in 3730 days


#12 posted 11-03-2019 04:55 PM

Great Stuff expandable foam filler then a rough file or sandpaper to sand flat.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5767 posts in 3779 days


#13 posted 11-03-2019 04:57 PM

What do you intend to do about those box joints? They are going to vibrate unless you take them apart and glue them.

View clin's profile

clin

1070 posts in 1531 days


#14 posted 11-04-2019 07:45 PM

I’d fill it with a chunk of wood that matches what the box is made out of (pine?). Not for looks, but so the filled in hole doesn’t show through the tweed cloth as the wood shrinks or expands with humidity. I.E., the wood and filler shrink the same.

I’m going to guess that this speaker cabinet is for a guitar amp. If so, then I wouldn’t wrap with MDF as the liveliness of a pine cabinet is part of the sound many desire from a guitar amp.

On the other hand, if this is going to be a a pair of hi-fi speakers, then the denser the better so the cabinet doesn’t contribute artifacts to the sound.

-- Clin

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tomsteve

975 posts in 1754 days


#15 posted 11-04-2019 09:28 PM

if i were to make a speaker enclosure out of a bee box or some other box that had a different purpose, i wouldnt go covering it afterwards. id want to see what i made the enclosure from.

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