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Stationary power tools vs hand held tools

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Forum topic by MrRon posted 10-31-2019 10:00 PM 738 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MrRon

5994 posts in 4254 days


10-31-2019 10:00 PM

It is my impression that there are more people using portable power (PP) tools than stationary power (SP) tools these days. There are several reasons that may be why. (1) PP tools were not around back then as they are today.
(2) More weekend warriors with only a casual interest in woodworking won’t invest in SP tools. (3) The high cost of SP tools limits woodworkers to PP tools. (4) Space considerations; people don’t have room for a fully equipped shop leads them to PP tools. (5) Mobility issues; People don’t want to have to move large bulky tools around when they move. (6) People who live in an apartment don’t have room for SP tools, or (7) all of the above.

Back in the late 40’s, early 50’s, SP tools were hitting the home market. PP tools were drills, circular saws, belt sanders and were used only by tradesmen They were heavy and didn’t appeal to the typical homeowner. My first power tool was a Delta drill press that I dragged home on a subway in NYC to my apartment in the upper west side. It wasn’t until the 60’s when I bought my first portable drill, a Skil 1/4”. I really didn’t start buying PP tools until around the mid 80’s, but still I had SP tools. I did live in houses then, so stationary was my choice. Today I have a shop full of SP tools and many PP tools. I find they all have their own purpose in life. Stationary is my first choice for any project and can be completed using stationary tools almost exclusively. The only reason why I use a PP tool is when I am doing a job around the house where a PP tool is (well) portable.


13 replies so far

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1483 posts in 1826 days


#1 posted 10-31-2019 10:18 PM

It is not my impression that more people are using hand held power tools now than in the past.

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becikeja

1167 posts in 3824 days


#2 posted 10-31-2019 11:26 PM

I prefer and mainly use stationary power tools today, but it has taken me 33 years in the hobby to build my shop out. I started with portable power tools as this was all I could afford back by then. Today portable power tools are much more available at the big box stores, and I know its hard to believe, but I know many people that have no idea where to get stationary tools. If you’ve never used them, its hard to select from on-line stores.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6406 posts in 3319 days


#3 posted 10-31-2019 11:42 PM

It’s my impression people are using the the best tool in their collection for the job at hand. Stationary, corded or hand held held.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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Aj2

3675 posts in 2808 days


#4 posted 11-01-2019 12:43 AM

I would never buy a power tool that’s yellow or green. But I like yellow or green M&M’S.
This is a clear example of me in conflict with myself. :)

Good Luck

-- Aj

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AlaskaGuy

6406 posts in 3319 days


#5 posted 11-01-2019 12:58 AM



I would never buy a power tool that’s yellow or green. But I like yellow or green M&M’S.
This is a clear example of me in conflict with myself. :)

Good Luck

- Aj2

Yellow and green dye may be unhealthy.

While there is no conclusive evidence that food dyes are dangerous for most people. Nevertheless, they may cause allergic reactions in some people and hyperactivity in sensitive children. However, most food dyes are found in unhealthy processed foods that should be avoided anyway.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View wingless's profile

wingless

80 posts in 753 days


#6 posted 11-01-2019 12:34 PM


I would never buy a power tool that’s yellow or green. But I like yellow or green M&M’S.
This is a clear example of me in conflict with myself. :)

Good Luck

- Aj2


My yellow (DeWALT) hand tools shown in the link have been solid performers for my usage.

http://forum.toolsinaction.com/search/?q=wingless&search_in=titles

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1782 posts in 612 days


#7 posted 11-01-2019 02:04 PM

Because I have bought so many of the Ridgid combo packs over the year for my business I have a endless supply of tools and chargers. The guys all decided that they hate ridgid so I had to replace with Milwaukee sets. The only thing wrong is the batteries wore out and since I have found some cheap replacement batteries on line it is like tools for free. The commercial brushless Milwaukee (not the big box store models) hold up the best IMO. We are pretty rough on them using 1” auger and 6’ long bits. The Dewalts we would trash the main bearings quickly and make them wobbly.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

7242 posts in 1585 days


#8 posted 11-01-2019 03:44 PM



It s my impression people are using the the best tool in their collection for the job at hand. Stationary, corded or hand held held.

- AlaskaGuy

I would swap “best tool” for most appropriate tool, for the situation.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

13550 posts in 3390 days


#9 posted 11-01-2019 04:30 PM


It s my impression people are using the the best tool in their collection for the job at hand. Stationary, corded or hand held held.

- AlaskaGuy

I would swap “best tool” for most appropriate tool, for the situation.

- therealSteveN


What’s the difference?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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therealSteveN

7242 posts in 1585 days


#10 posted 11-01-2019 09:44 PM

To me best tool has to do with what it cost, or name brand. As in, I have 23 Routers, but this is my best one…..

I use whichever tool I think will offer me the most appropriate end result, even if it was a 50 cent tool, I modified to do something.

Thanks for asking though.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Tony_S's profile (online now)

Tony_S

1426 posts in 4093 days


#11 posted 11-01-2019 10:43 PM

I use the best tool, or the most appropriate tool for the job at hand.
Which to the average Joe, means the same thing. Unless you’re a grammar cop. If you are a grammar cop, then AG, you’ve very shamefully used the word “best” in a completely inappropriate context.

What the hell do I know though? I swear like a drunken sailor most of the time. That’s what I like about eff bombs. So many different/appropriate contexts.

I’m such a heathen.

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

6406 posts in 3319 days


#12 posted 11-02-2019 05:13 PM


I use the best tool, or the most appropriate tool for the job at hand.
Which to the average Joe, means the same thing. Unless you re a grammar cop. If you are a grammar cop, then AG, you ve very shamefully used the word “best” in a completely inappropriate context.

What the hell do I know though? I swear like a drunken sailor most of the time. That s what I like about eff bombs. So many different/appropriate contexts.

I m such a heathen.

- Tony_S


Well what can I say? I screwed up bit time. The sliver lining in this cloud is the insight into therealSteveN personality. best: of the most excellent, effective, or desirable type or quality. appropriate: suitable or proper in the circumstances. “a measure appropriate to a wartime economy”

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3128 posts in 3035 days


#13 posted 11-03-2019 12:33 AM

Another aspect: size of material has some significance for me. I don’t want to wrestle a 10’ long plank through a bandsaw to cut a lengthwise curve (as one might do in boatbuilding, for example). Here, a portable tool lets the work rest solidly while you maneuver the tool—providing you have a hand held tool that can handle the plank, such as a powerful jig saw. Panel saws are stationary tools, while track saws are hand held. Both do the same job, more or less, when you are dealing with full panels of plywood.

Small material, say a 1’ long stick that needs to be ripped from 1.5” to 1.25”, is going to be awkward and even dangerous to cut with a handheld circular saw, whereas this is an easy job on a TS or bandsaw with a fence.

Of course these are generalizations, and there are in-between situations. Is a powered miter saw a stationary tool or a handheld tool? Neither, obviously, or both, sort of.

An intricate cut in 1/4” material is easier with a scroll saw (which functionally is a stationary tool) than with a hand held jigsaw.

I have both routers and a shaper. For some jobs the shaper excels, but for others (such as rounding edges on a large table or slab) the router works best.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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