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Forum topic by Coleman Dodds posted 10-30-2019 05:32 AM 491 views 1 time favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Coleman Dodds

6 posts in 59 days


10-30-2019 05:32 AM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing grain filling

What is everyones preferred method for filling open grain woods like oak? What are your favorite products to use? Also if you are looking for a darker contrast, what type of product do you use to tint the filler?


23 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12924 posts in 2915 days


#1 posted 10-30-2019 06:00 AM

I’ve been using Timbermate, don’t know if it’s the best but it’s a helluva lot better than anything else I’ve used. Easy to use, no stink, dries fast but not too fast, takes stain.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View mel52's profile

mel52

1066 posts in 800 days


#2 posted 10-30-2019 06:05 AM

I’m with Woodknack on the use of Timbermate. I’m sure there are many ways, but this works very well for me. You can get different colors or mix and match your own to get what you need. Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

347 posts in 3802 days


#3 posted 10-30-2019 08:38 AM

Personally, I really like the look of open grain wood like oak. I find that “natural” look much nicer than a mirror like polished surface. I apply linseed oil, then shellac. But that’s just me.

Sorry if that doesn’t answer your question. But I have to ask, why fill the grain at all?

View wildwoodbybrianjohns's profile

wildwoodbybrianjohns

429 posts in 83 days


#4 posted 10-30-2019 09:00 AM



Personally, I really like the look of open grain wood like oak. I find that “natural” look much nicer than a mirror like polished surface. I apply linseed oil, then shellac. But that s just me.

Sorry if that doesn t answer your question. But I have to ask, why fill the grain at all?

- DrTebi

+1 on that. I do the same. Or, alternatively, L.O. and beeswax.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

View Stephan in BC's profile

Stephan in BC

12 posts in 2249 days


#5 posted 10-30-2019 09:00 AM



Personally, I really like the look of open grain wood like oak. I find that “natural” look much nicer than a mirror like polished surface. I apply linseed oil, then shellac. But that s just me.

Sorry if that doesn t answer your question. But I have to ask, why fill the grain at all?

- DrTebi

One reason is period accuracy, or tradition. So much of the woodworks that we replicate today are of the period of 150-100 years ago, and it seemed to be seen as a sign of quality for the grain to be filled then.

-- Woodworking videos: https://www.youtube.com/AWoodworkersLife

View DrTebi's profile

DrTebi

347 posts in 3802 days


#6 posted 10-30-2019 09:43 AM

Personally, I really like the look of open grain wood like oak. I find that “natural” look much nicer than a mirror like polished surface. I apply linseed oil, then shellac. But that s just me.

Sorry if that doesn t answer your question. But I have to ask, why fill the grain at all?

- DrTebi

One reason is period accuracy, or tradition. So much of the woodworks that we replicate today are of the period of 150-100 years ago, and it seemed to be seen as a sign of quality for the grain to be filled then.

- Stephan in BC


OK, that’s of course a very good reason.

I haven’t tried this myself, but I came across a blog post where someone claimed that plaster is a good filler… here is the link to that post:
http://pianomaker.co.uk/technical/filling/

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5799 posts in 3029 days


#7 posted 10-30-2019 10:21 AM

I’m filling an oak desk top at the moment. I use Pore o’ Pack, and I tint it with gel stain…typically a GF stain, but this time I’m using Valspar. I don’t do this a lot, and even then only on the table tops but it works well enough.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

136 posts in 1584 days


#8 posted 10-30-2019 02:11 PM

Stain first and then I use AquaCoat. Apply coats until you get the fill appearance you are looking for. Allows for quick reapplication and I like the look it provides.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View RobS888's profile

RobS888

2616 posts in 2380 days


#9 posted 10-30-2019 02:26 PM

General question:

Are you filling the pores for look or feel?

I just use Danish oil and Arm-R-Seal, I sand to a higher grit if I want it smoother.

-- I always knew gun nuts where afraid of something, just never thought popcorn was on the list.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

868 posts in 1638 days


#10 posted 10-30-2019 03:34 PM

I have used joint compound to fill grain on objects to be painted. I have not tried it under a clear finish yet. It is cheap and very easy to use. I generally over fill and then sand off the excess. One coat usually does the job. One caution: applying a water based paint can pull the water soluble compound out of the pores as it is being rolled or brushed. For painted projects, I use BIN primer (alcohol based) to seal it first.
I have heard and read about using joint compound under clear finishes as well. I would have to experiment with stains as, I assume, the compound will take stains much differently than the wood. Also, again, probably a seal coat of shellac would be good if you are going to use a water based finish coat.

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6615 posts in 2801 days


#11 posted 10-30-2019 04:12 PM

I’m a big fan of Timbermate. I use a wet rag to clean the excess after filling a nail hole or whatever. I’ve mentioned in the past of someone here using Danish oil and sanding up a slurry to fill open grain wood. I’ve never tried it but it’s sounds like it might work.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4079 posts in 1109 days


#12 posted 10-30-2019 04:16 PM

Been a long time since I made a period correct WO project. There was a time it was my most used wood. I have always used Behlens PourOPac filler. Probably because back when it was all I knew about.

Instructions here. I use those throw away plastic putty knives now, back when, I had a metal knife just for this, and it was a PIA to clean. It’s pretty easy, dries as solid as can be, and I’ve never had any finish act up with it on.

I think the biggest learning curve thing here is make sure to:

“Note:Prior to topcoating allow overnight(or better 24 Hours) drying to insure that all solvents have evaporated from the filler. If the solvent has not completely evaporated from the filler, a gray ghosting effect may occur in the finishing steps. I used to let it go 2 or 3 days. Possibly longer if you did use a thinner, see below.

Pore-O-Pacâ„¢ may be top-coated with lacquer, acrylic, shellac or varnish (allow longer recoating time with varnish due to solvent absorption by the Pore-O-Pacâ„¢).”

I get mine from the local WoodCraft store. They also sell a “reducer” which you can use to thin it.

The MDSD for the reducer is here.

If you hunt that dog down most of it is going to be aliphatic petroleum distillates. Which if you go Googling, you will find they are. Mineral spirits, kerosene, white spirits, naphtha, and Stoddard solvent. I generally like the beginning of a list, rather than the end, so now I would use what I always have to thin it if needed using Mineral Spirits.

Straight out of the can PourOPac is pretty close to ready to go, so keep dilution to the minimum. I would try some straight from the can, and only dilute if you have a problem spreading it out.

-- Think safe, be safe

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

7504 posts in 3903 days


#13 posted 10-30-2019 06:15 PM

After trying many grain fillers I now use Timbermate exclusively! I am very happy with the results and the flexibility of Timbermate with regard to ease of applying, reuse of left over, and color matching.

The only thing to remember is that Timbermate is water based it must be covered with a non-water based finish before applying latex paint or water based finish.

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5799 posts in 3029 days


#14 posted 10-30-2019 06:29 PM

You guys that use Timbermate, do you tint it with water based stains? I’m guessing that oil based stains aren’t going to work(?).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Coleman Dodds's profile

Coleman Dodds

6 posts in 59 days


#15 posted 10-30-2019 06:43 PM

Thank you guys for your comments. After reading them I wanted to ask, how do you stain Timbermate and what products can you use? Also for those who prefer to leave the grain natural, I am just exploring this method. I want to see the difference. Again thank you guys.

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