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Dresser build - avoiding pocket screws

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Forum topic by Newbie17 posted 10-23-2019 01:11 PM 381 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Newbie17

20 posts in 1005 days


10-23-2019 01:11 PM

Topic tags/keywords: dresser

Hey again everyone, since my wife decided to switch around the order of projects I’m now building 4 dressers. As I was about to start, I started getting cold feet about using pocket screws on $1000 worth of wood. Here is the design she wants:

https://www.hertoolbelt.com/tall-dresser-with-tapered-legs/

After the replies I received about another project it seems protecting plywood edges is paramount for longevity. Considering I am probably going to avoid pocket screws and want to protect the plywood edges as much as possible, I plan to cut a housing dado in the 2×2s and frame the plywood in them instead of butt jointing and fastening with pocket screws. Will a glued up housing dado situation like this be strong enough without any additional fasteners? The plywood will be holding the weight of all of the drawers and probably kids climbing on it.


8 replies so far

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Robert

3558 posts in 2025 days


#1 posted 10-23-2019 01:19 PM

Yes to both questions.

I would secure at least the middle divider to the side stile with either pocket screws or loose tenon. This will prevent the dividers from separating from the stiles.

I like the proportions of the dresser, my only “objection” is the aesthetics of equal drawer heights. Its a rather utilitarian look for a dresser IMO, but that’s a matter of taste.

From a design standpoint, decreasing drawer heights from bottom to top will usually be more pleasing to the eye, but, of course, its more work.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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Axis39

89 posts in 141 days


#2 posted 10-23-2019 01:22 PM

If done to the correct proportions, housed dadoes will work perfectly. Time honored method.

Pocket screws will work as well. I’ve built thousands and thousands of dollars worth of cabinetry using them. I use them to build furniture all the time (where they will not be seen, of course). I like using them for drawer stretchers, frames that get covered, etc. But, I use a mix of both methods a lot of the time. Each method has it’s advantages.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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bandit571

23999 posts in 3228 days


#3 posted 10-23-2019 01:49 PM

I’d have to look up the Blog I did for this chest of drawers..

Frame and Panel sides….plywood panels…

1/4” plywood sits into these rabbets, nailed and glued in place..along with the rails…then webframes are glued and screwed to the assembled sides..

Screws go into the rails, not the plywood…

You can mold the edges as you like.

Add a face frame…

And a way to attach the top..

Drill slotted holes to allow the top to move with the humidity…slots run front to back. Mine was out of Pine…your choice of wood will also work…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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theart

140 posts in 1099 days


#4 posted 10-23-2019 03:42 PM


The plywood will be holding the weight of all of the drawers and probably kids climbing on it.

The attachment between the dust frames and the 2×2s is what’s going to be carrying the weight of the drawers. The plywood is really just there to prevent racking. A dado will be plenty strong.

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theart

140 posts in 1099 days


#5 posted 10-23-2019 03:43 PM


The plywood will be holding the weight of all of the drawers and probably kids climbing on it.

The joint between the dust frames and the 2×2s is what s going to be carrying the weight of the drawers. The plywood is really just there to prevent racking. A dado will be plenty strong.

- theart


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Newbie17

20 posts in 1005 days


#6 posted 10-23-2019 04:36 PM

Robert, thanks for the input about drawer height. I may make some design changes.

John, I agree that there are times where just about every joint has it’s place. My biggest issue is deciding which to use. I have the luxury of using Domino loose tenons or pocket holes for a quick joint and find myself almost always choosing the domino because it creates an incredibly strong joint.

Bandit571, wow thanks for the pics. Those images have a ton of information to digest. Good point about the slotted holes for the top.

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bandit571

23999 posts in 3228 days


#7 posted 10-23-2019 04:41 PM

The Blog is a “Build along” called Chester Drawers

Might take a day to read all through it…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

89 posts in 141 days


#8 posted 10-24-2019 02:16 AM



Robert, thanks for the input about drawer height. I may make some design changes.

John, I agree that there are times where just about every joint has it’s place. My biggest issue is deciding which to use. I have the luxury of using Domino loose tenons or pocket holes for a quick joint and find myself almost always choosing the domino because it creates an incredibly strong joint.

Bandit571, wow thanks for the pics. Those images have a ton of information to digest. Good point about the slotted holes for the top.

- Newbie17

I ‘need’ to pony up for a domino, I guess. LOL

I have two different sized biscuit joiners, my Kreg set up, and routers a plenty… So, I sometimes have too many choices as well!

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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