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Old GE 1/2 hp, Sleeve bearing, type KC motor, worth fixing up?

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Forum topic by BlasterStumps posted 10-22-2019 02:38 AM 636 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


10-22-2019 02:38 AM

This thing is fairly old best I can tell. It is 1/2 hp and, I think it weighs just under what 1/2 a horse would weigh. I’m wondering if it would be worth hauling to a motor repair shop to get it cleaned and checked out, add a new 3 wire cord and ? It was on a little table saw that is probably older than me and that is going back a ways. : )

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado


11 replies so far

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MrUnix

7499 posts in 2734 days


#1 posted 10-22-2019 04:12 AM

If you do the work yourself, it shouldn’t cost more than a few bucks for a new cord – and not even that if you happen to have a suitable extension cord lying around handy. At the very least, I’d crack it open and check the condition of the bearings and wicking felts – cleaning and re-saturating the felts if the bearings look good.

Whatever you do, don’t run it until you are sure the felts are full of oil – nothing will trash a sleeve bearing motor faster than running them dry.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


#2 posted 10-22-2019 01:55 PM

Brad, I was hoping you would respond. Thanks very much for the information. I will open it and take a look. Thanks again.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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Phil32

687 posts in 439 days


#3 posted 10-22-2019 04:51 PM

It appears to have a starting capacitor that may also need to be replaced.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


#4 posted 10-22-2019 07:43 PM

Thanks Phil, I will open the canister to see if there is anything noticeable but may just have to give it a try to find out it’s condition when I get the motor back together.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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MrRon

5767 posts in 3779 days


#5 posted 10-22-2019 08:44 PM

Those old motors were made to last unlike today’s motors. I used to have an old repulsion/induction motor that was a beast. Very powerful, but noisy. A 1/4 HP R/I motor would weigh as much as a 3 HP motor today. They sure don’t make them like it anymore.

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Phil32

687 posts in 439 days


#6 posted 10-22-2019 09:51 PM

The model plate says this motor is designed for continuous duty. Doesn’t that mean forever?!

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


#7 posted 10-23-2019 04:07 AM

Spent a couple hours cleaning and inspecting the old motor. Looks pretty good actually. Got about a quart of sawdust out of the inside. Didn’t smell burnt inside. Made sure the felts had plenty of oil. Capacitor looks okay. I will hunt around now for a good cord for it. Hope it works!

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


#8 posted 10-23-2019 03:50 PM

I got the motor running. It seems to run okay but makes a bit of noise like a motor boat. Not a bearing type noise but something inside is working. Maybe contacts? Anyway not sure what I will use it for but it was a fun project although heavy as the dickens.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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MrRon

5767 posts in 3779 days


#9 posted 10-23-2019 04:49 PM

Looks like the original use for that motor was not on a table saw. The thin tube feeding the pulley end bearing indicates that end was not easily accessible for oiling.

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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


#10 posted 10-23-2019 11:25 PM

MrRon, I would imagine you are right. I got it with an antique ShopMaster 8” table saw that was mounted on some really old crappie wood frame. I quickly pulled the motor and saw off the wood and sent the wood to the trash. Had more black widow egg sacks than were teeth on the saw blade . : )

Not sure what if anything I will do with either the motor or the table saw but, the table saw had a rip fence set up on it that looked like what I need for my 14” Delta bandsaw.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


#11 posted 11-02-2019 05:11 PM

I decided to put the ShopMaster CS 100 table saw back together with the old GE motor to see how it all worked. I cleaned up the top of the saw table some, made a small sled for it, mounted a new 7-1/4” blade and hooked up the motor. Wow, glad I did. Turns out it is a sweet running little guy. I’m torn now as to whether to keep it for cutting small stuff or see if someone else might want it for for that same purpose.

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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