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Dust Collector intermittent or continuous use?

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Forum topic by Alex Lane posted 10-20-2019 12:11 AM 918 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Alex Lane

552 posts in 4435 days


10-20-2019 12:11 AM

Topic tags/keywords: dust collector collection duty continuous use intermittent

I haven’t found any discussions regarding this, but if anyone knows of one, please post a link here.
I’d like to know folks’ opinion or experience with running a dust collector as needed… only when a connected tool is in use, as opposed to just leaving the DC on the entire time you’re in the shop and opening each blast gate as needed. I’m sure there are several factors to weigh, such as electricity use, wear/tear on motor/starter/switch, shop noise level, etc.

Thanks! :)

-- Alex...builder of wooden wings for vintage sport biplanes...I'm your wingman :)


21 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1040 posts in 3338 days


#1 posted 10-20-2019 12:39 AM

As a retired electrician, I have mine set up for autu start when I start the table saw, jointer, planer, shaper, beltsander, and bandsaw. For other machines, l have the start stop control locations to manually start DC for lathe and other low dust tools. I never let it run continuously. I have a time delay built in so the DC runs long enough to clear the ducts. The auto start system is easy to wire and not very expensive if there is a magnetic starter on your DC to connect to. And the auto start can be overridden by manual if I have a lot of work at a machine and turning the machine on and of frequently.

View pottz's profile

pottz

6779 posts in 1529 days


#2 posted 10-20-2019 02:04 AM

i only turn mine on with a remote as needed since i dont own an electric utility.they run the old electric bill quite high especially here in socal.sce sends me letters all the time saying im above the neighbor hood average.hey i pay my bill on time every month so shut up and leave me alone-lol.plus i dont want to heat that thing running all the time.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View pixeltim's profile

pixeltim

11 posts in 1447 days


#3 posted 10-20-2019 02:05 AM

I’ve always just run mine when using a machine, but I’m not a full time woodworker. If I was at it 8 hours a day and turning it on and off multiple times per hour, I’d consider leaving it on.

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BattleRidge

120 posts in 760 days


#4 posted 10-20-2019 03:37 AM

I will typically only run the DC when needed and if I am not actively running any machines needing collection will shut the unit down. To make shut-down easier, I removed the switch from the DC and placed it on the wall adjacent to my most-used equipment which makes it quite simple to activate – and with very little cost compared to remote switches (basically just the cost of a little wire and a couple electrical boxes and a receptacle). I also don’t have to spend time looking for a misplaced remote DC switch (which I know would happen)

Each of my woodworking machines has it’s own blast gate and I will generally only have the machine I am using open, though during some processes in which I am going back and forth between machines, I will leave two gates open with great collection.

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pottz

6779 posts in 1529 days


#5 posted 10-20-2019 03:54 AM



I will typically only run the DC when needed and if I am not actively running any machines needing collection will shut the unit down. To make shut-down easier, I removed the switch from the DC and placed it on the wall adjacent to my most-used equipment which makes it quite simple to activate – and with very little cost compared to remote switches (basically just the cost of a little wire and a couple electrical boxes and a receptacle). I also don t have to spend time looking for a misplaced remote DC switch (which I know would happen)

Each of my woodworking machines has it s own blast gate and I will generally only have the machine I am using open, though during some processes in which I am going back and forth between machines, I will leave two gates open with great collection.

- BattleRidge

my jet came with a remote so when im working i just keep it in a pocket of my apron,it’s always handy when im going from machine to machine,i walk enough miles without having to go to a central switch each time.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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WoodenDreams

806 posts in 455 days


#6 posted 10-20-2019 04:24 AM

I run my dust collectors only during time of use. The Air Filtration units I run during and use a automatic shut off for one hour after use.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4177 posts in 1119 days


#7 posted 10-20-2019 06:43 AM

There are a number of players in this game. The one I first came across was called an I Vac They come for 110, 0r 220 use. Vac. or Dust collector is plugged in, and tool as well. Turn on the tool, and it automates the vac, after the tool is off, the vac runs for a few seconds to clear the dust from the hose, then shuts off. I want to say they max at 15 Amps, but likely for more money, someone has bigger capacity if needed.

I’ve got 3 of them in use. Awesome for router tables, miter saws, and such. I’ve not had any issue using them, and they always work as described.

-- Think safe, be safe

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

1040 posts in 3338 days


#8 posted 10-20-2019 09:39 AM

Funny, I get the same letter from my utility, even when I am not in the shop for awhile. They probably send one to everyone, and could cut rates if they stopped.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5812 posts in 3038 days


#9 posted 10-20-2019 10:56 AM

Many of the motor manufacturers will specify the max number of on/off cycles per hour that a motor can handle. It’s usually a very small number, and it’s always directed toward industrial users (Oneida use to suggest it with their DCs). Even so, I find I’ll shut mine off between cuts often more than the recommendation (wireless remote). But if I’m bouncing around between tools, like sawing veneer, then jointing the face flat, then sawing again, I’ll leave it run. I think in a hobbyist shop do whatever you want…but be aware that rapid on/off can blow a capacitor.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

2754 posts in 3466 days


#10 posted 10-20-2019 12:12 PM



”...but be aware that rapid on/off can blow a capacitor.”

- Fred Hargis


Amen!

-- No PHD just a DD214

View Alex Lane's profile

Alex Lane

552 posts in 4435 days


#11 posted 10-20-2019 10:27 PM



Many of the motor manufacturers will specify the max number of on/off cycles per hour that a motor can handle. It s usually a very small number, and it s always directed toward industrial users (Oneida use to suggest it with their DCs). Even so, I find I ll shut mine off between cuts often more than the recommendation (wireless remote). But if I m bouncing around between tools, like sawing veneer, then jointing the face flat, then sawing again, I ll leave it run. I think in a hobbyist shop do whatever you want…but be aware that rapid on/off can blow a capacitor.

- Fred Hargis

That’s what I’m concerned about! Where I work has an new 5hp Oneida cyclone with that warning label on the motor not to cycle it more than 6 times per hour. Our shop is on an upper level mezanine and the DC is downstairs on the main level…and when we run it for prolonged periods of time, such as half an hour while bouncing between machines, we get complaints from the people working down near the DC of the excessive noise. But we already had one motor failure and replaced under warranty…I presumed it was from the frequent cycling on and off but later on an electrician determined that the contactor was burning itself up from all the starting and stopping. Thus my post of this question. Thanks for all the info and opinions…keep it coming!!

-- Alex...builder of wooden wings for vintage sport biplanes...I'm your wingman :)

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

597 posts in 2276 days


#12 posted 10-21-2019 07:55 PM

I’m a hobbyist—I have one of the smaller Oneida cyclones (which came with the frequent on/off warning) and when I turn it on I usually leave it running, unless I don’t plan on using a tool requiring dust collection for at least 15 minutes.

View DS's profile

DS

3327 posts in 2965 days


#13 posted 10-21-2019 08:47 PM

The only systems I’ve seen being left on continuous is where multiple simultaneous users operate machinery in a production environment. These systems tend to be very large and are only turned off during breaks and at the end of the day.

For a smaller shop, or the home hobbyist, the remote control, or automatic start systems seem to be the order of the day.

This has been my experience, FWIW.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1962 posts in 2039 days


#14 posted 10-21-2019 09:52 PM

Contactor ratings are PIA to engineer and specify.
My guess is that Onieda decided to save money and use AC3 nominal rated IEC contactor, when a commercial operation should be using a larger AC4 rating. What this often translates into is bigger and more expensive relay, so it can deal with extra heat generated by increased contact arcing.
Solution is simple: If current D20-D30-D40 contactor fails too soon, install a larger D40-D60 next time. It will last longer.
YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2473 posts in 3489 days


#15 posted 10-22-2019 06:33 AM

I had a large, commercial cyclone system, but sold it and went to three smaller collectors instead.

Just for reference, two, on opposite sides of the shop, are “four bag” (two up, two down) collectors and one is a two bag collector. One has a cyclone and the other will have one.

My reason for the swap is simple – large systems do not tolerate being turned off and on as well as smaller systems do. As such, I chose to switch to a couple 3 horse units and one 2 horse unit (which does double duty as a pine cone cleaner-upper, working in conjunction with a Super Dust Deputy.

My 2 horse is activated by the miter. The other units tend several tools and may run five minutes, repeatedly, or five hours.

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