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TAS In The Desert

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Forum topic by BubbaIBA posted 10-18-2019 06:50 PM 303 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BubbaIBA

514 posts in 2921 days


10-18-2019 06:50 PM

Posts on sharpening and rust prevention started the thought process for this post.

If I had to deal with rust on a daily bases I wouldn’t have time to do any woodwork or I’d have to shed most of my tools. There are advantages to living in the desert if you have TAS (Tool Acquisition Sickness). The desert, a little Johnson’s Wax, and mostly using oil stones for sharpening takes care of most rust/corrosion problems. I’m not sure if there is a cure for TAS.

The second part of this post deals with keeping all those suckers sharp. In my experience there are two to four major divides in approaches to sharpening. The first is mostly freehand vs. those that use a jig when they are able. The second are the folks that seldom return a tool to the rack that is not working sharp and will sharpen mid job vs. the ones that if a tool dulls will just grab another and set the dull tool aside to be sharpened when the sharpening pile reaches critical mass or they run out of sharp tools. Those two groups end up being four, Freehand vs. jig vs. sharpen when dull vs. critical mass.

There is no value judgement of the four camps, it’s just different ways of working. Because I’m in the freehand/sharpen when dull group I expect in reality I could function at about the same level I do now with no more than a dozen or so chisels. Would I do it? Ain’t no way as long as I’m in the desert. With a move out of the desert I expect a few tools would go and it might even cure my TAS..

Photos of my chisel racks to show the extent of my sickness:

First the rack behind the main workbench that holds most of my day to day chisels. BTW, if you went through the racks, with the exception of the “why do I keep these chisels” rack and a few new to me chisels that are still being set up, every chisel is sharp and ready to use.

The rack above the main tool shelf also behind the main workbench.

The rack over the sharpening bench where I store most of the mortise chisels and gouges.

And last the rack where the”Why do I keep these chisels” are stored.

There are even more “why do I keep these chisels” in chisel rolls stuck in different coroners of the shop. It is a sickness but for the most part harmless, better than Porsche’s and blondes and a little safer and cheaper.

ken


9 replies so far

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

597 posts in 2276 days


#1 posted 10-18-2019 07:11 PM

I guess you can never have enough chisels. I assume these are not all unique and there is some redundancy in sizes.

Since you have had the opportunity to try many different chisel brands, is there one or two that have risen to the top that you prefer?

When you think about buying another chisel or set of chisels is it usually out of need or want?

Does your “sickness” extend to other tools or just to chisels?

Thanks for sharing.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

294 posts in 146 days


#2 posted 10-18-2019 08:26 PM

You know you have too many chisels when you have to rack them sideways to save room. You almost need to pull them out one by one to see the width (size). Awesome collection though.

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BubbaIBA

514 posts in 2921 days


#3 posted 10-18-2019 10:11 PM



I guess you can never have enough chisels. I assume these are not all unique and there is some redundancy in sizes.

Since you have had the opportunity to try many different chisel brands, is there one or two that have risen to the top that you prefer?

When you think about buying another chisel or set of chisels is it usually out of need or want?

Does your “sickness” extend to other tools or just to chisels?

Thanks for sharing.

- Bill_Steele

Bill,

You are correct, there are many duplicates in size but even if the same size, because of steel, shape, and handle most are unique and better suited for some jobs than others. Any more it is seldom about need but I collect pre-WWII Marples chisels and if I see one and it is in reasonable shape I jump on it.

Also I have a contact in Japan that has long term relationships with the older Blacksmiths who because of age are dying and not being replaced by younger Smiths. Once they are gone a true art form will die with them. I’m trying to collect as many of their chisels as I can afford before there are no more. BTW, if you have ever used a well made and sharpened Blacksmith made Japanese chisel you will understand why they are so prized.

Of the current Western chisels (I try to only buy and use chisels made with HC steel like O1) the best in hand for most bench jobs are made by Ashley Iles. Robert Sorby makes a set of pattern makers chisels, I know of no others that are made with O1. Then there are the pre-WWII Marples that are near perfect bench chisels, wonderful balance and very good steel, their biggest problem is finding ones that do not have rust pitted backs.

Yes I have TAS for planes, especially wood stock joinery planes, Saws, marking gauges, and sharpening stones both Ark Oil and JNats. Just not as bad as for chisels.

Thanks for asking,

ken

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BubbaIBA

514 posts in 2921 days


#4 posted 10-18-2019 10:14 PM



You know you have too many chisels when you have to rack them sideways to save room. You almost need to pull them out one by one to see the width (size). Awesome collection though.

- controlfreak

Freak,

I’m not there yet :-). You speak as if from personal knowledge.

ken

View Eric's profile

Eric

132 posts in 782 days


#5 posted 10-20-2019 10:07 AM

...I have a contact in Japan that has long term relationships with the older Blacksmiths who because of age are dying and not being replaced by younger Smiths….

Of the current Western chisels (I try to only buy and use chisels made with HC steel like O1)....


Is the the guy on SCM?

I notice you have a set of the new Stanley 750 remakes. Are they O1 steel?

You know you have too many chisels when you have to rack them sideways to save room. You almost need to pull them out one by one to see the width (size). Awesome collection though.

- controlfreak

Freak,

I m not there yet :-). You speak as if from personal knowledge.

ken

- BubbaIBA

It appears all your chisels are racked sideways, bubbaipa….

-- Eric

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Don W

19372 posts in 3112 days


#6 posted 10-20-2019 12:16 PM

I believe there is only one cure for TAS . And as they say, “you can’t take them with you”

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

514 posts in 2921 days


#7 posted 10-20-2019 12:28 PM



...I have a contact in Japan that has long term relationships with the older Blacksmiths who because of age are dying and not being replaced by younger Smiths….

Of the current Western chisels (I try to only buy and use chisels made with HC steel like O1)....

Is the the guy on SCM?

I notice you have a set of the new Stanley 750 remakes. Are they O1 steel?

You know you have too many chisels when you have to rack them sideways to save room. You almost need to pull them out one by one to see the width (size). Awesome collection though.

- controlfreak

Freak,

I m not there yet :-). You speak as if from personal knowledge.

ken

- BubbaIBA

It appears all your chisels are racked sideways, bubbaipa….

- Eric

Eric,

At one time Stan was but not now.

Not that I know of, they are mystery steel. There are others in the racks as well such as a set of Veritas PMv11 chisels and a couple of others. Sometimes you have to give ‘em a go, usually with the same result. They get racked and gather dust. The Stanley chisels still get used because they have Hornbeam handles. Hornbeam is one of the few handle woods that will stand up to the use of steel hammers. Wonderful stuff I wish more chisel makers would use it.

Good eye but not there yet. With new chisels I will rack ‘em sideways if they have not been prepped and ready to use and sometimes they just end up being racked sideways not for any reason but just “because”. I expect to buy a few more sets of Japanese bench chisel and a few specialty chisels. The bench chisels most likely will not be racked but will remain in their boxes.

ken

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BubbaIBA

514 posts in 2921 days


#8 posted 10-20-2019 12:38 PM



I believe there is only one cure for TAS . And as they say, “you can t take them with you”

- Don W

Don,

Ain’t that the truth.

One thing I can say for it, tools can be works of art that even a poor ol’ West Texas farm boy like myself can buy and own. My wood stock planes, both bench and joinery, the Japanese chisels, and the early Stanley planes to my mind are works of art. They all give pleasure to the hand and eye.

ken

View Don W's profile

Don W

19372 posts in 3112 days


#9 posted 10-20-2019 04:08 PM


I believe there is only one cure for TAS . And as they say, “you can t take them with you”

- Don W

Don,

Ain t that the truth.

One thing I can say for it, tools can be works of art that even a poor ol West Texas farm boy like myself can buy and own. My wood stock planes, both bench and joinery, the Japanese chisels, and the early Stanley planes to my mind are works of art. They all give pleasure to the hand and eye.

ken

- BubbaIBA

Buy, make, restore. It’s all the same.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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