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Resawing Live Edge Slab

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Forum topic by docspencer posted 10-18-2019 06:05 PM 421 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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docspencer

397 posts in 2481 days


10-18-2019 06:05 PM

I have a live edge cherry slab that I’d like to resaw. It’s a bit over 13” wide, 27” long, and 3” thick. The resaw capacity on my bandsaw is 13”. Both edges of the slab are live edge. Problem 1: since both edges are live edge I don’t have a flat edge to run on the bandsaw table. Problem 2: the slab is too tall on edge for my saw. Oh, and its too wide to run through my planer to I can’t get a nice flat side to run against the saw fence.

I could run one side through my table saw, but I’d lose one of the live edges.

I’d appreciate any ideas you all might have to how to proceed. Thanks.


23 replies so far

View Phil32's profile

Phil32

687 posts in 439 days


#1 posted 10-18-2019 06:10 PM

You have correctly analyzed your problem. Perhaps you could find someone with the machine capacity to resaw your cherry slab.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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Aj2

2529 posts in 2333 days


#2 posted 10-18-2019 06:21 PM

This is where a good 8 inch jointer earns it keep. You would rip down the center joint one edge flat to the face and resaw the halves.
Then put everything back together.
I’ve done this very operation several time. Resawing wide or tall stuff tends to cup anyways.
If your wood is dry 6 1/2 inch Resaw will save thickness because less cupping.

Good Luck

-- Aj

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Brawler

82 posts in 366 days


#3 posted 10-18-2019 06:32 PM

First of all what is the final piece you are going for, (example 27×13x 1.5). Could you possibly cut the board, work both sides and biscuit joint them back together?

-- Daniel

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Brawler

82 posts in 366 days


#4 posted 10-18-2019 06:35 PM

Sorry AJ, I think we were writing at the same thing the same time

-- Daniel

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GoingUp

44 posts in 783 days


#5 posted 10-18-2019 07:22 PM

A heavy duty work bench and frame saw ala Roubo frame saw? Lot of work compared to machines but does exactly what you wish for.

Or an alaskan chainsaw mill. Would lose more wood that way but considerably less manual labor and finesse required from you.

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Phil32

687 posts in 439 days


#6 posted 10-18-2019 07:48 PM

How do you accurately rip down the center with two live edges?

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5555 posts in 2887 days


#7 posted 10-18-2019 07:56 PM

I would knock off a little bit off of the live edge on both sides so that it comes in under 13”. It won’t ruin the look of the live edge if you don’t take it all off. You’ll have to build a sled to hold it while you run it through the table saw.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

429 posts in 83 days


#8 posted 10-18-2019 08:27 PM

I could run one side through my table saw, but I d lose one of the live edges.

- docspencer

You could do this, and then carve a new psuedo live-edge. If you dont have carving discs for an angle grinder, you could just use flap discs, 60º, 80º, 120º. you could even match the new edge with the cutoff.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

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GoingUp

44 posts in 783 days


#9 posted 10-18-2019 08:53 PM



How do you accurately rip down the center with two live edges?

- Phil32

Track saw

View pottz's profile

pottz

6639 posts in 1520 days


#10 posted 10-18-2019 09:34 PM


How do you accurately rip down the center with two live edges?

- Phil32

Track saw

- GoingUp


+1 easy

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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Phil32

687 posts in 439 days


#11 posted 10-18-2019 10:29 PM

I would mark the center with a straight pencil line and cut on the bandsaw. Then a light touch with the jointer would give me straight edges to re-glue after the resawing. This process would probably remove less wood than a table saw.

-- Phil Allin - There are mountain climbers and people who talk about climbing mountains. The climbers have "selfies" at the summit!

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theoldfart

10928 posts in 2986 days


#12 posted 10-18-2019 10:57 PM

Per GoingUps suggestion

This method works better if you put a kerf line to follow

The slab was about 2” thick by 14” wide by 28” long.

-- "With every tool obtained, there is another that is needed" DonW ( Kevin )

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BobAnderton

302 posts in 3326 days


#13 posted 10-18-2019 11:22 PM

The Alaskan chainsaw mill is a good suggestion. 3/8” kerf width isn’t that bad out of a 3” piece. The resulting pieces will be flat, or at least parallel to one face.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

View KYtoolsmith's profile (online now)

KYtoolsmith

93 posts in 396 days


#14 posted 10-19-2019 12:10 AM

Can you find someone with a band saw mill? My Timberking 1220 can resaw up to 32” wide slabs. I do it regularly when cutting lumber from trees on my place. All you loose is the 1/8” kerf of the band, and little or no effect on either live edge.
Regards, The Kentucky Toolsmith!

-- "Good enough" is just another way of saying "it could be better"...

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pottz

6639 posts in 1520 days


#15 posted 10-19-2019 01:18 AM



The Alaskan chainsaw mill is a good suggestion. 3/8” kerf width isn t that bad out of a 3” piece. The resulting pieces will be flat, or at least parallel to one face.

- BobAnderton


that would work but does he want to invest in,maybe a chainsaw and then the attachments? for one slab,i dont think so.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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