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Interior door router bit question

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Forum topic by magaoitin posted 10-17-2019 08:37 PM 232 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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magaoitin

249 posts in 1585 days


10-17-2019 08:37 PM

Fellow Jocks,
Has anyone purchased/used/heard of, a set of rail and stile router bits for building an interior door (1 3/8” slab) that allows for a 1/2” insert panel? I realize this only leaves 7/16 of “meat” holding the panel in place on each side, so there is not a lot to work with for, say a double roman ogee, but I would be happy with a simple cove or round over. anything other than a square shaker style edge.

I have seen them for exterior doors at 1 3/4” thick , but all of the interior door sets I can find are setup for either a 1/4” panel, or a full back cutout, with glass bead.

I have a feeling I am looking for something that doesn’t exist, but if anyone would know, its you guys!

I will probably have to resort to a Shaker style mortise and tenon and cutting in a chamfer of some sort after the door is assembled, or use multiple bits and lots of adjusting and resetting the router position

Thanks!
Jeff

-- Jeff ~ Tacoma Wa.


3 replies so far

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Rich

5227 posts in 1225 days


#1 posted 10-17-2019 08:57 PM

The standard bit configuration for an interior door cuts a 3/8” groove for the panel. Set up for a 1-3/4” entry door, that groove is 1/2”. You correctly state that a 1/2” groove on a 1-3/8” door would leave little to hold the panel. In the case of an ogee, it would also not allow the full profile to be cut and would definitely look odd. You are also correct that a Shaker profile would work but it would still leave a very small reveal that might look odd.

Why do you need 1/2”? My interior doors, which you can see on my project page, use a 3/8” groove. The panels are raised on both sides, so a 7/8” panel easily is cut back to fit in a 3/8” groove. There’s no reason you couldn’t use a full 1-3/8” panel as well, but there’s no need to.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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magaoitin

249 posts in 1585 days


#2 posted 10-17-2019 10:26 PM

The simple answer is that I have 1/2” material for the insert, that cannot (should not?) be cut down, and I want to reuse the existing 1 3/8” stock I have milled.

I am hesitant to use a Bead Glass style bit set as I would have to add trim to one site of the door to hold the panel, and then I’d just end up adding the same trim to the opposite side of the door to make them match, which I think would look sloppy.

I have a number of custom acrylic panels that are 1/2” thick that will be used in lieu of wood or std glass panels. While I could “theoretically” shave the panels down with a panel bit, it would most likely ruin them, or at the least make it overly obvious the edges were modified. They are a multi-layered acrylic pane, and while shaving 1/8” off might not expose the inner layers, I don’t have faith I could:
1. cut the panels without them burning, warping, or melting
2. polish the edge back to match the face

While this is something out of the ordinary I am trying, I’m sure this is not the first time its been done, and figured this would be the place to ask.

When I use these acrylic panels on cabinet doors, I use a std removable glass bead rail and stile setup, which isn’t an issue. The panels just stick out inside of the cabinet and are held with a glass stop/retainer clip. However I have never tried to do this with an interior door, hence the question.

-- Jeff ~ Tacoma Wa.

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Rich

5227 posts in 1225 days


#3 posted 10-17-2019 10:32 PM

OK. You didn’t mention the acrylic originally. A Shaker bit set configured for 1-3/4” doors would probably work just fine. That’ll give you your 1/2” groove.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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