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Forum topic by adot45 posted 10-12-2019 01:35 PM 1071 views 0 times favorited 63 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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adot45

162 posts in 1159 days


10-12-2019 01:35 PM

So what is everyone using these days? I read the thread from 2011 and just wondered if something has
come along that is the new “latest and greatest”. I have seen the one wheel guide types and for some unknown reason, they don’t appeal to me. Also, I have a two wheel Stanley that the plastic angle setting guide broke off the first day of use but I still use it. I’d like to get something else if it’s out there…...

-- David -- sent from my linux box


63 replies so far

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chriscarter

23 posts in 627 days


#1 posted 10-12-2019 01:59 PM

When I first started I got the Veritas guide. It was pricey, but I got it as a gift. However, now I freehand everything. It takes a little practice, but it’s not that hard. And it’s like 20 times faster. Plus, eventually you acquire lots of tools with blades that will not fit in any jig and you will have to be able to freehand those or they simply will not be sharpened at all.

You will notice a trend: People who use jigs really dislike sharpening and try to avoid it until the blade just doesn’t like to cut at all. People who freehand don’t find sharpening a burden at all and sharpen frequently so their edges are always razor sharp. Food for thought.

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Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#2 posted 10-12-2019 02:25 PM


You will notice a trend: People who use jigs really dislike sharpening and try to avoid it until the blade just doesn t like to cut at all. People who freehand don t find sharpening a burden at all and sharpen frequently so their edges are always razor sharp. Food for thought.

- chriscarter

Then there’s a third type of person—me—who doesn’t freehand and regularly keeps his tools razor sharp and ready. If you’re serious about woodworking, sharpening is a regular part of your routine no matter how you do it.

Be careful with generalizations. They rarely work. That one sure didn’t.

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Eric

130 posts in 773 days


#3 posted 10-13-2019 08:02 AM

I use the Veritas Mark II guide with the accessories for every type of blade I own. I also own the Veritas grinder guide for resetting edges. I like the accuracy and repeatability of the Veritas guides.

-- Eric

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laterthanuthink

44 posts in 665 days


#4 posted 10-13-2019 10:36 AM

A little off topic if I may. Is anyone using magnification as a sharpening aid? Visors, special glasses, even a microscope? Thanks for your thoughts.

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Peteybadboy

1270 posts in 2485 days


#5 posted 10-13-2019 10:43 AM

I also have the Veritas Mark II

-- Petey

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Don W

19365 posts in 3103 days


#6 posted 10-13-2019 11:29 AM

I would think ( and it’s just my opinion) that at some point you would want to take the training wheels off.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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Eric

130 posts in 773 days


#7 posted 10-13-2019 12:54 PM

I always find it interesting that sharpening threads always devolve to name calling. One wood think if their opinion has validity it wooden’t take insults to make it. Six posts in and it’s game on! (Edits aside)

-- Eric

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Wintergreen78

45 posts in 275 days


#8 posted 10-13-2019 05:06 PM

I just use one of the cheap side-clamp honing guides. Sometimes, if I’m in the middle of something, I’ll quickly tune up a chisel or plane free hand, but I like to regularly use the guides to make sure the bevel angle doesn’t get too far away from my goal.

How much of the free hand vs guide debate is people talking past each other? I get the impression that a lot of the free hand only people also use a grinder to re-set the bevel angle every so often. Then the hollow grind makes it easier to just polish the very edge of the tool. I don’t use a grinder, so if I let the bevel get too steep I have a lot of work on a coarse stone to fix it. Do most of the free-hand only people also use grinders to re-set their bevel angles? Do most of the people who use guides not use grinders?

I’ve been meaning to make jig to speed up setting the clamp at the right extension, but I find it pretty quick to set it up with a ruler.

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Don W

19365 posts in 3103 days


#9 posted 10-13-2019 06:16 PM



I always find it interesting that sharpening threads always devolve to name calling. One wood think if their opinion has validity it wooden t take insults to make it. Six posts in and it s game on! (Edits aside)

- Eric

I don’t see any name calling in this thread. What did you take as name calling?

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#10 posted 10-13-2019 06:28 PM


I always find it interesting that sharpening threads always devolve to name calling. One wood think if their opinion has validity it wooden t take insults to make it. Six posts in and it s game on! (Edits aside)

- Eric

I don t see any name calling in this thread. What did you take as name calling?

- Don W

That had me scratching my head as well, Don.

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bandit571

23959 posts in 3219 days


#11 posted 10-13-2019 06:33 PM

And..
.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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BlasterStumps

1446 posts in 975 days


#12 posted 10-13-2019 06:35 PM

yes to the visor. Unfortunately my up close sight has deteriorated to that point. A real bummer when I try to sharpen saws. : ( . I use the visor quite often when sharpening plane irons, chisels, drill bits and saws. I even use a low power boom zoom microscope for setting saw teeth.


A little off topic if I may. Is anyone using magnification as a sharpening aid? Visors, special glasses, even a microscope? Thanks for your thoughts.

- laterthanuthink


-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

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laterthanuthink

44 posts in 665 days


#13 posted 10-14-2019 10:42 AM



yes to the visor. Unfortunately my up close sight has deteriorated to that point. A real bummer when I try to sharpen saws. : ( . I use the visor quite often when sharpening plane irons, chisels, drill bits and saws. I even use a low power boom zoom microscope for setting saw teeth.
- BlasterStumps

Thanks Blaster. I see a lot of options out there. Do you have links to the visor and microscope that you find useful?

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smallerstick

24 posts in 1713 days


#14 posted 10-14-2019 01:26 PM

I will vote for training wheels. Mine are from Veitas and I like them a lot.The narrow chisel option is especially helpful. I buy and use mostly old chisels, regrinding the edges in most cases, so sharpening aids work for me.

To be honest, I don’t think much about freehand sharpening, I’m t skilled enough to go that route but I really don’t mind at all.

-- Peter

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HokieKen

11296 posts in 1674 days


#15 posted 10-14-2019 01:58 PM

I use the Veritas MK1 guide for sharpening on diamond plates. I have, over the past couple of years gone to using the Work Sharp 3000 for most of my plane iron and chisels. I use the Work Sharp honing guide for plane blades and the built in port for chisels. I also free hand chisels quite often on a fine oil stone and/or leather strop when in use. Try as I may, I just can’t get it right freehanding plane irons though.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

showing 1 through 15 of 63 replies

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