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Shavespoke Sharpening Jig

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Forum topic by BubbaIBA posted 10-12-2019 03:48 AM 775 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


10-12-2019 03:48 AM

Spokeshave irons are hard to hold for sharpening. Classic bevel up/tanged irons are really hard to sharpen.

This is not new, others have done the same but here is a jig I made to help hold spokeshave irons.

The thin end will be set up to hold short cutters. I wanted to see if it worked before investing the time to set up for short irons.

It works, the irons are still a PITA to sharpen but the jig makes it easier. I will add the cut out and holes for short irons and clean up the jig to finish it.

ken


16 replies so far

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Bill_Steele

715 posts in 2543 days


#1 posted 10-24-2019 05:14 PM

That’s creative. Do you put this blade holder in a honing guide or do you use it freehand? I’ve noticed other people use the Wixey angle gauge with jigs similar to this to help identify the sharpening angle. Thanks for sharing.

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Aj2

3199 posts in 2609 days


#2 posted 10-24-2019 07:39 PM

Ken I’m not understanding how it works .
Are you sure that’s a spoke shave blade. It looks like a draw knife blade.
I will patiently await your response.

Good afternoon

-- Aj

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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


#3 posted 10-24-2019 08:02 PM



That s creative. Do you put this blade holder in a honing guide or do you use it freehand? I ve noticed other people use the Wixey angle gauge with jigs similar to this to help identify the sharpening angle. Thanks for sharing.

- Bill_Steele

Bill,

It will fit the Tormek holder if I need to grind but most of the time I just freehand. It is easier that way.

ken

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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


#4 posted 10-24-2019 08:35 PM


Ken I’m not understanding how it works .
Are you sure that’s a spoke shave blade. It looks like a draw knife blade.
I will patiently await your response.

Good afternoon

- Aj2

AJ,

Bevel up shaves usually have tangs, old one were held by friction. Most modern bevel up shaves use threaded tangs that are held in place with nuts. The jig is made to hold the shave cutter by the tangs. The reason it is needed or helpful is the cutters are very small. If I can find some photos I’ll post later.

While the bevel down shave has its use, if you ever use a well tuned wood stock bevel up shave you’ll never go back to the bevel down ones, except for hogging off lots of wood and sometimes with wood that has really difficult grain. The bevel up shaves can speak to your soul.

ken

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Bill_Steele

715 posts in 2543 days


#5 posted 10-24-2019 08:42 PM

AJ—I think he’s using a spokeshave blade for wood spokeshaves

I’ve been using the Veritas small blade holder

My spokeshave blade looks like this

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Bill_Steele

715 posts in 2543 days


#6 posted 10-24-2019 08:42 PM

oops sorry

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Aj2

3199 posts in 2609 days


#7 posted 10-24-2019 10:11 PM


AJ,

Bevel up shaves usually have tangs, old one were held by friction. Most modern bevel up shaves use threaded tangs that are held in place with nuts. The jig is made to hold the shave cutter by the tangs. The reason it is needed or helpful is the cutters are very small. If I can find some photos I ll post later.

While the bevel down shave has its use, if you ever use a well tuned wood stock bevel up shave you ll never go back to the bevel down ones, except for hogging off lots of wood and sometimes with wood that has really difficult grain. The bevel up shaves can speak to your soul.

ken

- BubbaIBA

Ok cool I understand. I have a blade from a draw knife that was a Flex cut. Your blade reminded me of that except mine doesn’t have any holes. It was never a fun tool for me but I still have it minus the handles.
I like the regular Lie Neilson spoke shaves I have two . With the A 2 blades the steel is not my favorite but that’s what I got to work with for now.

Good Luck

-- Aj

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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


#8 posted 10-24-2019 11:12 PM

AJ,

First, I’m good at spending other folks money but you owe it to yourself to check out “Dave's Shaves They are a joy to use, bevel up, wood stock, and with O1 cutters instead of A2. Bevel up and bevel down shaves have different strengths and weakness but for 90% or more of my intended use a bevel down shave will do a better job. it is kinda like bevel up vs. bevel down hand planes, not the same but is kinda.

A bevel down shave can take thicker shavings and handle difficult grain better than a bevel up shave but sucks at end grain. If used with sensitivity (working with what the grain gives you) and taking fine shavings the bevel up shave is a joy to use. I have a number of posh bevel down shaves gathering dust in my tool cabinet. Before I discovered wood stock shaves I avoided using shaves when I could, now they are one of the first tools I reach for when they are needed.

ken

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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


#9 posted 10-24-2019 11:16 PM



AJ—I think he s using a spokeshave blade for wood spokeshaves

I ve been using the Veritas small blade holder

My spokeshave blade looks like this

- Bill_Steele

Bill,

You are correct, except my blades/cutters have tangs. BTW your Veritas jig looks like it would work well for bevel down cutters.

ken

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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


#10 posted 10-25-2019 12:16 AM



AJ,

First, I m good at spending other folks money but you owe it to yourself to check out “Dave s Shaves They are a joy to use, bevel up, wood stock, and with O1 cutters instead of A2. Bevel up and bevel down shaves have different strengths and weakness but for 90% or more of my intended use a bevel down shave will do a better job. it is kinda like bevel up vs. bevel down hand planes, not the same but is kinda.

A bevel down shave can take thicker shavings and handle difficult grain better than a bevel up shave but sucks at end grain. If used with sensitivity (working with what the grain gives you) and taking fine shavings the bevel up shave is a joy to use. I have a number of posh bevel down shaves gathering dust in my tool cabinet. Before I discovered wood stock shaves I avoided using shaves when I could, now they are one of the first tools I reach for when they are needed.

ken

- BubbaIBA

That should have been bevel up. My bad, letting the fingers get ahead of the eyes and brain.

ken

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Aj2

3199 posts in 2609 days


#11 posted 10-25-2019 12:52 AM

Dave shaves look great.
I’m hoping to re tool lots of my hand tools and stuff in my shop. Next year should be better for the woodshop. I’ve been a little obsessed with the Artistic aspect of woodworking so my shop hasn’t made much this year.
Here’s what I’ve been working with.

-- Aj

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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


#12 posted 10-25-2019 02:36 AM



Dave shaves look great.
I’m hoping to re tool lots of my hand tools and stuff in my shop. Next year should be better for the woodshop. I’ve been a little obsessed with the Artistic aspect of woodworking so my shop hasn’t made much this year.
Here’s what I’ve been working with.

- Aj2

Aj,

Those are nice, what I call “posh”, bevel down shaves. I’ll bet Hock makes O1 replacement cutter for ‘em. I have the LV equivalent.

If you would like to try a bevel up shave WoodCraft sells a WoodRiver metal body bevel up shave for around $50-$60 USD. It isn’t as nice as one of Dave’s but it would give you a chance to try a bevel up on the cheap. I have one and it started me down the bevel up path. Again not as nice to use but it gives a taste for not much money. BTW I still use it for rough work.

ken

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OSU55

2651 posts in 2801 days


#13 posted 10-25-2019 12:01 PM

You can also try one of LV’s shave kits, make your own handle or get a blank from them. Here is my review of the small one. It works great but can cause a lot of tear out.

Bevel up shaves typically are low angle bevels, andwork best with straight or end grain, and bevel down shaves tend to be 45 deg cut angles working better for twisty grain.

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Wooly_Woodworks

31 posts in 792 days


#14 posted 11-07-2019 08:24 PM

I dig your jig. :D I went very low tech and cheap. Based on design from Paul Seller’s book. Works for my needs.

-- Ben, aka Wooly Woodworks, Instagram: @woolywoodworks.

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BubbaIBA

541 posts in 3188 days


#15 posted 11-07-2019 09:16 PM



I dig your jig. :D I went very low tech and cheap. Based on design from Paul Seller s book. Works for my needs.

- Wooly_Woodworks

Ben,

I expect your jig works very well for bevel down cutters, in fact I can’t see any reason to need another.

Bevel up shaves are a different animal, they are very narrow and sometimes have attached tangs. In addition they do not have cap irons to hold them. It takes a different jig, maybe paddle stones, or very strong fingers to sharpen one.

Whatever, a sharp shave is a joy to use.

ken

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