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Forum topic by NoSpace posted 10-12-2019 01:17 AM 514 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NoSpace

170 posts in 1776 days


10-12-2019 01:17 AM

Any favorites in terms of ease of use? raising / lowering the bit or changing bits priority; power doesn’t matter. The router will be dedicated to table use only.

I have a dewalt pk611 that is great with plunge base. On a table, its okay; twisting a ring raises/lowers canister. But it’s not real tight, and can get out of adjustment.

I also have a small makita fixed base, 6.5 amps; it’s rock solid holding the adjustment in place but cumbersome to adjust even without a table.

Both Ryobi and porter cable have one with an adjustment knob and possible above table adjustment, but wondering what others would recommend for a router table.

Again, it will be 100% dedicated to the table so features that don’t benefit ease of operation for a router table don’t matter for me.

ETA: I’m upgrading a homemade router table I have w/ 16×26 Melamine board w/ Kreg insert and track. So it will attached to the Kreg.


16 replies so far

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1264 posts in 3122 days


#1 posted 10-12-2019 01:36 AM

I have a triton 3 1/4 hp router, a Bosch 1617 and porter cable 690. The Bosch is what I replaced the porter cable with because of the slow start and adjustable speed I have the Bosch in a Kreg router lift. The triton I mounted with a Kreg plate made for it. The triton has a built in method for raising it with a crank handle.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

868 posts in 1638 days


#2 posted 10-12-2019 01:54 AM

I have a Milwaukee model mounted in my table. It has a screw adjustment that moves the motor small increments in the barrel base and a clamp mechanism to hold the setting. This works well either upright or upside down. It is easy to reach under the top to use the adjustment knob and clamp. I believe if you put a hole in the table top in the correct location, you could use a long “wrench” to reach down to turn the adjustment screw from the top. To change bits, I release the clamp and press a large button to disengage the adjustment screw, The motor drops out and I bring it up to the table top to make the change. There may be other brands that do the same thing.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4079 posts in 1109 days


#3 posted 10-12-2019 04:34 AM

I have old Porter Cable 690’s in smaller tables for simple edges off smaller bits. They are all hand adjust, everything.

I have the 3.5 HP Triton in a larger table, and it does through the table height adjust just fine. I see people complain about a variety of things with them??? I don’t have a reference point to that. That said I have seen gripes about every tool there is at some point online.

I like the Triton so much that I also bought a 2 1/4 Hp unit as well, and I like it for edge work, and it has been in a smallish table a time or two as well. Currently I think it might be attached to a circle guide.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#4 posted 10-12-2019 04:45 AM

Which Kreg insert do you have? Is it the Precision Router Lift? If so, there are a limited number of motors that will fit.

For my money the Bosch 1617 is a good choice. I’ve used one in my JessEm to mill the profile on 1-3/4” door stiles in one pass, so don’t let the 2-1/4 HP rating scare you off.

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NoSpace

170 posts in 1776 days


#5 posted 10-12-2019 01:23 PM

Rich, I got the 59$ one. I confess I just went for it on an impulse without being well informed. I had the insert and track installed on a board and this post up before realizing that my current routers aren’t even options for it, as they are too small. I built a table a few years ago and just mounted my little DeWalt 611 to the underside of the tabletop.

The 1/2” routers I’m noticing all seem basically up to the task, and I think the primary concerns I had were due to the little routers not being meant for router tables in the first place.

For those who said Porter Cable 690, I was about to pull the trigger on one last night until I noticed Woodmaster said no adjustable speed. Can’t have that.

The next I found was the Bosch 1617 and now with Rich’s endorsement I’d probably just do it, but what do you guys think of the Porter Cable 890s? (I don’t need anywhere near 2 HP actually but I do need variable speed and the above-table adjustment would be really cool)

I ask because the woodworking store in my area sells Festool and Porter Cable exclusively, they sold me the kreg insert actually but I was on autopilot. I can go in and walk out with something today. If there’s a good reason to wait until Amazon 1 day can get me something Sunday I can, but I’m out of town for work on Monday and wanted to get this done before then.

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Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#6 posted 10-12-2019 01:31 PM


Rich, I got the 59$ one. I confess I just went for it on an impulse without being well informed.

- NoSpace

Nothing wrong with a fixed plate. I used one for years with a DeWalt DW625 plunge router mounted to it. It gets a little clumsy working under the table for adjustments, but other than that it was a good setup that I got a lot of use out of.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3555 posts in 2016 days


#7 posted 10-12-2019 01:32 PM

I’ve pretty much been through all the iterations: regular router, Router Raizer, Triton.

I would like to comment on the Triton in case you’re considering it. I thought I had the final solution with the Triton but it developed a backlash in the gears so that when the lock is released the collet would drop – a lot, like up to 1/8”. As you can imagine, this makes dialing in a bit height impossible. I think one thing to watch out for is forgetting to unlock before adjusting the height. I don’t think I ever did that, but its possible.

Regardless, Triton tech support’s answer was “its the nature of the beast”. Meaning this is a known problem I’m guessing due to plastic gears.

So, I bit the bullet, went with Jessem Power Tek router and MastRLift. So comparatively, I’m “Cadillacking” now. The detached power/speed supply unit is a very nice feature.

So don’t rely on built in heigh

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

4079 posts in 1109 days


#8 posted 10-12-2019 04:44 PM



I ve pretty much been through all the iterations: regular router, Router Raizer, Triton.

I would like to comment on the Triton in case you re considering it. I thought I had the final solution with the Triton but it developed a backlash in the gears so that when the lock is released the collet would drop – a lot, like up to 1/8”. As you can imagine, this makes dialing in a bit height impossible. I think one thing to watch out for is forgetting to unlock before adjusting the height. I don t think I ever did that, but its possible.

Regardless, Triton tech support s answer was “its the nature of the beast”. Meaning this is a known problem I m guessing due to plastic gears.

- Robert

I’ve seen you post this as a “problem” before. Just to make sure I understand you…

This droop only occurs when you unlock it correct?

So if you are changing the height of the bit, you have to move it correct? For that you need to unlock it, right?

-- Think safe, be safe

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

791 posts in 446 days


#9 posted 10-12-2019 06:12 PM

In my router table I have the Craftsman variable speed 2 1/4hp router with a fixed base. I had this set-up for three years now, and works well for me. I do have a 1/4” hole in the table to feed the allen wrench to adjust for fine adjustments. just reach down to unlock, slide up or down the router, then do the fine adjustments and lock the base after the fine adjustment. I do run a 1 1/4” hose to the Shop Vac from the router. Also have a 2 1/4” hose for dust collection at the fence. The 2 1/4hp is probably undersized in power for my 3 1/4” panel bits, but I have had no problems. I do have a small mirror angled below the router to see the speed setting on the router, for when I do rpm speed adjustments.

View NoSpace's profile

NoSpace

170 posts in 1776 days


#10 posted 10-12-2019 07:13 PM

I wanted to get this done today so I got the Porter cable 892 as it’s the only one in reach. A little bit of work to retro this onto the old router table i built I kind of want to keep, but the hardest part so far was to countersink the holes for screws mounting the router base to the kreg insert. what a nightmare. (no drill press)

Not quite all ready yet but enough to make sure the router turns on etc. seems like changing bits will be alright, and I do really like the height adjuster. doesn’t require unlocking but feels solid. router is pretty quiet on low setting so I feel like it’s going to work out.

if anyone has made their own router table with something other than melamine board let me know. seems like its going to chip up pretty fast. now that I have the pattern for the insert and, well, a router table, it would be pretty fast to build another top.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

80 posts in 132 days


#11 posted 10-12-2019 07:14 PM

I picked up a Ridgid router a couple of years ago as a dedicated table router. Honestly, I needed a router in a hurry, the router I had in the table took a dump and I was in the midst of a job.

While it is not a big honkin’ 3 1/4 HP (which I would like to get sooner rather than later) I have no complaints. It has some nice features, including soft start, and adjustability from above the table (with an included tool).

I dunno that I’d truly recommend it, but I have no complaints. I do wish it was a bit bigger. But, as a handheld router, it’s a nice piece of equipment. Like I said, I have no complaints with it and I’ve put it through some serious hard work over the last couple of years. I’ve probably run tens of thousands of feet across it (if not more) without so much as a hiccup.

I do have a few Dewalt routers, one is over 25 years old and still kicking it. I think all three I have are over 20 years old and still hammering along. But, newer models have so many great features… It might be time to do some replacing, myself?

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View SMP's profile

SMP

1419 posts in 441 days


#12 posted 10-12-2019 07:24 PM

I went with the Bosch 1617 as well due to:
1. Best value
2. Past experience with Bosch tools(and automotive priducts)
3. Assortment of accessories such as router table base.
4. Mine had the top accesible lift screw.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5767 posts in 3779 days


#13 posted 10-13-2019 04:10 PM

I have a Hitachi 12V router in my router table; not a good choice. Bit changes are difficult to do. The router lift is OK.

View Newbie17's profile

Newbie17

18 posts in 996 days


#14 posted 10-16-2019 08:05 PM

I went with the Porter Cable 3.25 HP motor. It works great so far.

Edit: I have it on a lift, so I don’t have issues with changing bits. Lifts are expensive, but reliable.

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

591 posts in 2267 days


#15 posted 10-18-2019 03:28 PM

I have the smaller (2.25hp) Triton (MOF001) in my router table and I recommend it. I have owned it for about 5-10 years and have not experienced any problems with mine. My router does not drop at all when I release the locking lever. It has a lot of nice features—single wrench above the table bit changes, built-in raising mechanism, variable speed, soft start, decent dust collection, etc. I’ve found that 2.25hp is plenty for my needs. It does have an odd power switch—with a little plastic door that has to be held open in order to turn it on—but I consider that an inconvenience more than anything.

I sympathize with Robert (and other people presumably) with regard to the problems he is experiencing with his Triton router. If I understand it correctly his router is the larger hp (3.25hp) router (TRA001) and it drops down about 1/8” when he releases the locking lever. Any perceptible change in bit height when releasing the locking lever is unacceptable in my opinion. I think with this problem it would be just about impossible to make small adjustments to get to the desired depth of cut.

These 2 routers look to be the exact same design. I believe they both have non-metal gears (maybe nylon or Delrin) in the height adjustment mechanism. The instructions specifically state that the internal helper spring must be removed (very easy to remove) when the router is used in a router table. Leaving the spring in place would put additional strain on the height adjustment gears—possibly damaging them (e.g. bend/break teeth). The spring is there to help lift the router motor up when used in a handheld capacity. I think there is a weight difference—the 2.25hp router weighs ~10lbs while the 3.25hp router weighs ~14lbs—perhaps that extra weight adds a little more strain on the gears.

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