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Forum topic by car16 posted 10-01-2019 02:05 AM 988 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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car16

10 posts in 2932 days


10-01-2019 02:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: lighting

I haven’t posted in years but, building a new shop and am looking for input on lighting. I’ve been using a one car garage for years that has also stored all my other crap. Just built a 30×50 pole barn for a new shop (waiting on electric service and concrete). Twelve foot walls. Any suggestions on lighting would be appreciated. Looking for something in the 5500K spectrum, obviously LED. Unsure of number of fixtures, wattage, etc. I want decent overall light with task lighting over the table saw and other tools as needed.


18 replies so far

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2139 posts in 3708 days


#1 posted 10-01-2019 02:34 AM

I bought my led fixtures at Sam’s, and they have been fine for four years so far. I think the ones they have now have multiple light levels. I would never use that feature myself, but you might like it. There are also some led fixtures with multiple color feature, which might be nice for changing to regular indoor color for finishing. If you don’t have the floor in yet, think about some floor receptacles and some dust collection ducts. I have both and it sure is nice not to trip over anything.

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therealSteveN

6648 posts in 1489 days


#2 posted 10-01-2019 05:43 AM

“Looking for something in the 5500K spectrum, obviously LED.” That is the important part. I cannot fathom paying for mood lighting in a shop? Warm this, cool that, I want bright and glaring.

How many??? I put mine up in a grid, and kept adding until I can’t find a shadow in my shop. Some may think it too much money, but for my 65 year old eyes I can clearly see around all of my tools. I’d ask someone thinking I may have too many doing that, if they have priced a finger lately.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1815 posts in 1503 days


#3 posted 10-01-2019 02:30 PM

You need more lighting. It’s not bright enough unless the wood starts to burn when you set your glasses down on it.

LED is the way to go.

M

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View Castor Woodworks's profile

Castor Woodworks

96 posts in 756 days


#4 posted 10-01-2019 02:36 PM



I haven’t posted in years but, building a new shop and am looking for input on lighting. I’ve been using a one car garage for years that has also stored all my other crap. Just built a 30×50 pole barn for a new shop (waiting on electric service and concrete). Twelve foot walls. Any suggestions on lighting would be appreciated. Looking for something in the 5500K spectrum, obviously LED. Unsure of number of fixtures, wattage, etc. I want decent overall light with task lighting over the table saw and other tools as needed.

- car16

I have 10 ft Ceilings in my garage and use these:
https://amzn.to/2nsVYWH

They work great!

-- Castor Woodworks, https://www.instagram.com/castor_woodworks

View pottz's profile

pottz

12271 posts in 1899 days


#5 posted 10-01-2019 02:39 PM

i agree with the above make it bright and led all the way.ive got a 30×30 shop and have 42 4’ bulbs and i may add a few more.when you get to the point you need sunglasses your good-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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muleskinner

941 posts in 3352 days


#6 posted 10-01-2019 02:49 PM

Just to add my voice to the chorus . . . there’s no such thing as too much. I started replacing my fluorescents with LED fixtures from Costco, 19 bucks apiece I think. I just kept buying a few every time I saw them until I ran out of space to hang them.

-- Visualize whirled peas

View Brawler's profile

Brawler

180 posts in 746 days


#7 posted 10-01-2019 04:14 PM

First of all I would paint the walls white, it is simply amazing on how much that helps. I found 4’ LED “bulbs” on amazon for a little over $6 each that fit in florescent fixtures. I went with the frosted bulbs to limit harsh shadows, however that is a personal preference. LED’s don’t consume much energy so put in as many as you can, you can never have enough light. I have eight 4’ double light fixtures in a 18’X19’ shop with white walls, I have plenty of light. With that high ceiling you will probably need a good bit of task lighting too.

-- Daniel, Pontiac, MI

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

6569 posts in 3408 days


#8 posted 10-01-2019 05:13 PM

3 years ago I built a 32×50 “garage” with 10’ ceilings that became a 32×30 woodshop, and a 32×20 storage room. I wound up buying 4’ LED fixtures from Costco and put 6 in the storage room (also a mechanical shop) and 15 in the woodshop. It’s not enough, I’m planning on adding 4 more in the woodshop and maybe 2 more in the storage room. These are 4000K lights, 3700 Lumens each. There is no pattern to the layout in the Wood shop. I installed 7 ceiling outlets (woodshop) and waited for the DC ducts to be up, then positioned the lights over the tools and workbenchs. I would ahve liked the 5500K lights better, but these are very good, and fairly cheap. I’ve had them in service for 2 years and haven’t had one fail yet, but if it does it will be an easy replace….unplug and remove the failed one and install it’s replacement. So I like your plan of light temp and type, go with the outlets and you can easily move them if you get one off a little. BTW, these fixtures are so light compared to the fluorescent ones I used int the past installing them was a breeze. But to your question: there are all kinds of guidleines as to how many lumens per square foot. I at roughly 60 lumens per square foot and would like a few more…...but I’m 71. That number increases with age (I’m told).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

4085 posts in 3263 days


#9 posted 10-01-2019 05:51 PM

Consider using can lights. You can buy LED bulbs for them at nearly the same price as regular ones. Why cans? The lights are recessed so you don’t have to worry about taking one out with a piece of lumber. You can also set up a grid pattern that gives a much more consistent light than with typical bay lights like the florescent ones.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2139 posts in 3708 days


#10 posted 10-01-2019 06:09 PM

You have enough lights when you can no longer see the ceiling.. I have upper cabinets on 3 walls, and have 4’ fixtures under these as well. Lots of light is good. More light is better, especially as the eyes get older.

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5954 posts in 4159 days


#11 posted 10-04-2019 03:57 PM

A good arrangement is to use 4’ or 8’ LED’s for general lighting and some task lights placed where needed. Place lights where your body won’t cast a shadow on your work.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

1386 posts in 516 days


#12 posted 10-04-2019 04:32 PM

I have used some LED shop lights from Sam’s Club made by honeywell. Great output and you can connect several together so adding some in between is easy to do.

View LesB's profile (online now)

LesB

2667 posts in 4358 days


#13 posted 10-04-2019 05:07 PM

It is hard to go wrong with LED lights except I found out they emit an RF (radio frequency) signal that interferes with the AM/FM radio I listen to in my shop. I tried converting my 8’ flourescent fixtures to 120v LEDs, the type that works without a transformer. It worked great except for the RF problem. In my garage I converted the four 4’ fixtures to direct wire LEDs (no transformer) and they work great. When I brought the radio from the shop into the garage I still got some RF interference but not as much as the 8’ tubes put out.

So you might save some money by going to a recycling center and picking up some used fluorescent fixtures, 4’ or 8’, and rewiring them for direct 120v LED tubes. Unless you already have some. Some fluorescent fixtures need to have their tombstones (end brackets) changed but that it quite easy and inexpensive. One source of LEDs I used includes new tombstones with the tubes. There are LED tubes that are set up for electrical connections at both ends of the tube or just one end so be sure to check that out.

I like the one idea above about using recessed fixtures. Besides protecting the tubes they won’t collect dust and spider webs like mine do.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Brawler's profile

Brawler

180 posts in 746 days


#14 posted 10-04-2019 05:30 PM



It is hard to go wrong with LED lights except I found out they emit an RF (radio frequency) signal that interferes with the AM/FM radio I listen to in my shop. I tried converting my 8 flourescent fixtures to 120v LEDs, the type that works without a transformer. It worked great except for the RF problem. In my garage I converted the four 4 fixtures to direct wire LEDs (no transformer) and they work great. When I brought the radio from the shop into the garage I still got some RF interference but not as much as the 8 tubes put out.

So you might save some money by going to a recycling center and picking up some used fluorescent fixtures, 4 or 8 , and rewiring them for direct 120v LED tubes. Unless you already have some. Some fluorescent fixtures need to have their tombstones (end brackets) changed but that it quite easy and inexpensive. One source of LEDs I used includes new tombstones with the tubes. There are LED tubes that are set up for electrical connections at both ends of the tube or just one end so be sure to check that out.

I like the one idea above about using recessed fixtures. Besides protecting the tubes they won t collect dust and spider webs like mine do.

- LesB


Hello Les, I don’t have that issue with the radio, is it on AM or FM? most cases AM is more susceptible to RF than FM is.

-- Daniel, Pontiac, MI

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LesB

2667 posts in 4358 days


#15 posted 10-06-2019 04:53 PM

Regarding the RF problem. Part of my situation is that I’m in a rural area and the radio signals are weak to begin with but the RF affected both AM and FM. With the weaker signal the RF just overpowers the radio.

-- Les B, Oregon

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