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Walnut Dining Table - Suggestions to minimize racking?

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Forum topic by BoilerUp21 posted 09-30-2019 12:49 AM 531 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BoilerUp21

146 posts in 1302 days


09-30-2019 12:49 AM

So i have glued up my 1-1/2” table top which has dimensions of 84” long x 40” wide.

This top will sit on a frame with 3” square legs and an apron of 1-1/4” thick walnut as well. (see pictures for reference)

I had planned to place some runners under the top in the 40” width direction (3-4 of them), but not sure that will do too much to stiffen the whole setup. Thoughts?

There is slight wobble when i tested it out as pictured. This is without the Z-clip table top fasteners to secure the table top to the base frame. I also purchased some kerf mount corner brackets as well to add rigidity, but not convinced this will do too much. And before you ask, yes the apron is attached to the legs with the dreaded pocket holes…please refrain from any discussion on this.

If there are any suggestions, maybe running some braces from rail to rail @ 45 degrees to stiffen? I would greatly appreciate any feedback.


10 replies so far

View TravisH's profile

TravisH

686 posts in 2470 days


#1 posted 09-30-2019 02:14 AM

I would add the kerf mount metal corner plates and attach the top with z clips should be good to go.

I would try small corner blocks before trying your larger rail to rail “corner brackets” if that is the way you decide to go.

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Woodknack

12924 posts in 2915 days


#2 posted 09-30-2019 04:15 AM

On a table that size with pocket screwed aprons, I too would have added the corner brackets. Intermediate stretchers (what you called runners) aren’t necessary on a table that size if built correctly. Angled braces are amateur hour, only used to repair improperly built tables. If your table is racking, it means the screws are not holding tight on the aprons but the corner brackets should fix the problem.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Aj2

2529 posts in 2333 days


#3 posted 09-30-2019 04:36 AM

It need a taller apron with mortise and tenon joinery. Unfortunately there some designs you cannot cut corners.
Pockets screws are just not good enough.
If your absolutely set on using pocket screws look for a leg to apron brackets.

You can find this one at Rocker.

Good Luck

-- Aj

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bilyo

868 posts in 1638 days


#4 posted 09-30-2019 06:49 PM

Sorry. I cannot refrain from commenting on the pocket holes. In this instance your table might be perfectly sturdy and rigid with proper M&T joints but, I agree with the above, If you insist on using pocket holes, the apron needs to be about twice that wide. The forces on that joint when someone pushes sideways on the table are tremendous. The pocket hole screws just won’t cut it. Even with the metal corner brackets, I don’t think you have enough apron in contact with the legs to adequately resist the forces. The “runners” you propose will not help with this problem. Nor will the “z” clips when you attach the top.

You have created a beautiful table with lots of expense in materials and labor. I encourage you to construct it properly. Doing so will insure that it lasts and looks beautiful for a long long time.

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JackDuren

485 posts in 1495 days


#5 posted 10-21-2019 05:16 PM

Your fine… the apron is fine and the use of runners on edge between the apron should be fine. The z clips well be fine…

I build these the same way for restaurants.. I’ll post pictures once my phone is working again..

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BoilerUp21

146 posts in 1302 days


#6 posted 10-21-2019 06:03 PM

I actually gave in to the pocket hole criticism and went with M&T as well as nearly doubled the width of the apron pieces. Will be gluing up tomorrow and attaching the top with z clips hopefully on Sunday…

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JackDuren

485 posts in 1495 days


#7 posted 10-21-2019 06:10 PM

That’s fine. If your happy, I’m happy…

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BoilerUp21

146 posts in 1302 days


#8 posted 10-27-2019 01:40 PM

Well attached are pictures of the final product. No pocket holes and it is very sturdy after increasing the size of the apron pieces and using M&T. Thanks for the input.

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

67 posts in 290 days


#9 posted 10-27-2019 03:16 PM

Very nice work!

Dining and work tables often are called upon to take lateral forces that other table types (and their joinery) are not capable of handling over the long term.

Just out of curiosity, did you miter or half-lap the ends of the rail tenons, or stop them short of intersecting?

Andy

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BoilerUp21

146 posts in 1302 days


#10 posted 10-27-2019 03:22 PM



Very nice work!

Dining and work tables often are called upon to take lateral forces that other table types (and their joinery) are not capable of handling over the long term.

Just out of curiosity, did you miter or half-lap the ends of the rail tenons, or stop them short of intersecting?

Andy

- AndyJ1s

Stoped them just short of intersecting. Cut the short apron tenons because the long apron tenons i wanted more length on because they obviously have to span further.

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