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Book matched or slip matched?

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Forum topic by jsvenson11 posted 09-27-2019 11:19 PM 557 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jsvenson11

16 posts in 1113 days


09-27-2019 11:19 PM

I ordered 15 sheets of slip matched cherry veneer for cabinet fronts. I did slip matched to avoid the “barber poll” effect that happens with book matched cherry because of the loose-tight grain alternation from the veneering process. The pictures are what showed up today (not great lighting). The first picture shows the “barber pole” stripes at the far end. Next to show flitch pattern. I’d like to be reasonable with the lumber yard, but I’m pretty sure that this is book matched. To make sure I’m not nuts, I’d appreciate any other second opinions. Thanks in advance.


15 replies so far

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Rich

6507 posts in 1594 days


#1 posted 09-27-2019 11:37 PM

Looks slip matched to me.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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jsvenson11

16 posts in 1113 days


#2 posted 09-27-2019 11:45 PM


Looks slip matched to me.

- Rich

Thanks, Rich. The mirrored aspect of the grain in the second two pictures and the barber pole effect in first picture make me think its book matched but I don’t have a lot of experience comparing book vs. slip. Is there anything you’re looking at that tells you its slip matched?

Other flitches seem to be fully slip matched like this one:

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LeeRoyMan

1531 posts in 732 days


#3 posted 09-28-2019 12:13 AM

What you needed was a rotary cut 1 piece face.

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jsvenson11

16 posts in 1113 days


#4 posted 09-28-2019 12:20 AM



What you needed was a rotary cut 1 piece face.

- LeeRoyMan

Considered that but it gives a much different grain pattern than we’re going for. Slip matching avoids the barber poll and gives a straight grain across the sheet. Rotary gives a wide open, varied grain. For example

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Rich

6507 posts in 1594 days


#5 posted 09-28-2019 12:21 AM

Looking more closely at the second photo in your original post, I have to correct myself. I did not originally see that joint down the middle of the rows. So yeah, it’s looking more like a series of book matched pieces. It’s difficult to say with 100% certainty from the photos though.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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Aj2

3662 posts in 2803 days


#6 posted 09-28-2019 01:58 AM

That’s booked matched for sure on one side. But what’s on the other side

-- Aj

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TungOil

1383 posts in 1500 days


#7 posted 09-28-2019 02:30 AM

It’s book matched. Look at the table top in my projects page to see an example of a slip match.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Tony_S

1422 posts in 4088 days


#8 posted 09-28-2019 10:38 AM



Other flitches seem to be fully slip matched like this one:

- jsvenson11

That one is book matched as well, just like the rest.


What you needed was a rotary cut 1 piece face.

- LeeRoyMan

For shame LeeRoy….The elitist snots will be looking for blood.
btw…I’m still holding that job opening for you ;)

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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LeeRoyMan

1531 posts in 732 days


#9 posted 09-28-2019 01:35 PM


For shame LeeRoy….The elitist snots will be looking for blood.
btw…I m still holding that job opening for you ;)

- Tony_S

LOL, Right on brother, Mom still has a few more years to go.
Then you might see someone that resembles LeeRoy knocking at your door…. :)

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splintergroup

4635 posts in 2227 days


#10 posted 09-28-2019 02:06 PM

I’d call it slip matched. I don’t see the mirror pattern of book matched since all bends in the grain go the same direction, If you could indicate more clearly in the photos where the seams are, it’d be a lot easier.

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Rich

6507 posts in 1594 days


#11 posted 09-28-2019 02:11 PM


I d call it slip matched. I don t see the mirror pattern of book matched since all bends in the grain go the same direction, If you could indicate more clearly in the photos where the seams are, it d be a lot easier.

- splintergroup

I thought the same thing initially. If you look closely at his second photo (I had to zoom in) in the main post, what at first appeared to be slip matched strips actually are book matched. There is a joint that’s barely visible down the middle of each of those strips.

The site compresses photos so much that any details are lost.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

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TungOil

1383 posts in 1500 days


#12 posted 09-28-2019 04:58 PM


I d call it slip matched. I don t see the mirror pattern of book matched since all bends in the grain go the same direction, If you could indicate more clearly in the photos where the seams are, it d be a lot easier.

- splintergroup

I thought the same thing initially. If you look closely at his second photo (I had to zoom in) in the main post, what at first appeared to be slip matched strips actually are book matched. There is a joint that s barely visible down the middle of each of those strips.

The site compresses photos so much that any details are lost.

- Rich


It fooled me at first glance as well, but it’s definitely book matched. I don’t recall ever seeing commercial slip matched veneer, now that I think about it. Not saying it’s not available, but I have never come across it, only book match and rotary sliced.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

View Tony_S's profile (online now)

Tony_S

1422 posts in 4088 days


#13 posted 09-29-2019 11:03 AM


I don’t recall ever seeing commercial slip matched veneer, now that I think about it. Not saying it’s not available, but I have never come across it, only book match and rotary sliced.

- TungOil

With all the commercial suppliers I’ve ever dealt with, a slip match would typically be a custom press.
Just thinking out loud here….
From my experience, it’s unusual to see a rift/quartered ‘book match’. Which is what the OP has. Book match sheet goods are almost always flat sawn (Cathedral grain). Rift/quartered veneer flitches would ‘typically’ be narrower, just like solid lumber, so using it for a book match is only going to increase, or magnify the barber pole effect because there would be more pieces/48” width (as above).

-- “Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” – Plato

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splintergroup

4635 posts in 2227 days


#14 posted 09-29-2019 01:52 PM


I thought the same thing initially. If you look closely at his second photo (I had to zoom in) in the main post, what at first appeared to be slip matched strips actually are book matched. There is a joint that s barely visible down the middle of each of those strips.

The site compresses photos so much that any details are lost.

- Rich

Good eye! Even close up it took me a while to find the line. That photo is booked.

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splintergroup

4635 posts in 2227 days


#15 posted 09-29-2019 01:56 PM


It fooled me at first glance as well, but it’s definitely book matched. I don’t recall ever seeing commercial slip matched veneer, now that I think about it. Not saying it’s not available, but I have never come across it, only book match and rotary sliced.

- TungOil

I was a bit biased since I bought a stack of office doors at auction a number of years back. Really nice rift sawn red oak, definitely slip matched. I’d assume for production goods it may all depend on what the assembler was thinking that day.

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