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Help!! Refinishing front door, more complicated then you think.

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Forum topic by Steveandzero posted 09-27-2019 12:32 PM 1154 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Steveandzero

5 posts in 48 days


09-27-2019 12:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing doors teak tung linseed varnish

Hi all,
Need some help/advice on what product to refinish my new front door with.
Whatever varnish or poly product they originally used failed. Don’t know what it was. I can strip the old stuff off using a tooth brush and some Formby’s stripping gel, and a LOT of time.

My question to you all is what to use to now.

I’m leaning towards something like Teak, Tung, or Linseed oil.

My goal is to use a product that just needs reapplication when it reaches failure. Sanding between coats really is not an option.

I don’t want to ever have to strip this door ever again.

Thanks !!!


19 replies so far

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John Smith

2044 posts in 699 days


#1 posted 09-27-2019 01:30 PM

that’s going to be a job for sure. especially since you want a low maintenance finish.
do you absolutely want to keep somewhat of the “clear” finish?
are you opposed to the option of a solid stain or paint ?
what part of the world do you live in ? UV is the killer. and must be addressed accordingly.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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Steveandzero

5 posts in 48 days


#2 posted 09-27-2019 02:18 PM

This is on my new house in Ohio, snow in winter and hot/humid in summer.
I definitely DO NOT want to paint or use a solid stain.
I’m not opposed to maintenance, but don’t want to strip it down every 5 years. That’s why I was looking into oils. I could just reapply them every summer or when needed.

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Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#3 posted 09-27-2019 03:21 PM

That baby does need some help. Of the oils you mentioned, pure tung oil will give you the most protection. Cut it 50/50 with something like naphtha, paint thinner or turpentine. Boiled linseed oil is an option as well and will cost less. It’s really up to you.

Teak oil is a finish that contains oil and resins similar to Danish oil or what’s labeled as tung oil finish (and contains no actual tung oil). Either of those will work as well and might last a little longer. Regardless of what you choose, your plan for yearly maintenance is a good one.

One thing about pure oils though—it appears that there is some finish left on the door up where it gets less exposure. Oils like tung and linseed won’t penetrate that. Teak, Danish oil or tung oil finish won’t either, but they will form a thin film over it.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

429 posts in 83 days


#4 posted 09-27-2019 03:53 PM

I dont envy you, mate. Got some serious man-hours there if you aim to strip off the old finish, but itll be worth it in the end, IMO.

Why not try a blend of tung and L.O. and naptha or M.S.?

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

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Steveandzero

5 posts in 48 days


#5 posted 09-27-2019 07:33 PM

I am planning to strip of the old finish, one panel at a time. Figure 50-60 man hours. This is what I don’t want to go through again if I use the wrong stuff.

I’ve used linseed oil on several gun stocks and furniture, and I like the fact that I can just wipe on a new coat when need but never outdoors. No experience with other types of oils.
Is one oil offer better uv Protection over the other? Dose one require less sanding between coats?

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Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#6 posted 09-27-2019 07:58 PM


Is one oil offer better uv Protection over the other? Dose one require less sanding between coats?

- Steveandzero

Nope. No UV protection. Keep in mind that teak oil and tung oil finish contain resins. That might be a problem since you want to just toss on a new coat periodically.

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Steveandzero

5 posts in 48 days


#7 posted 09-27-2019 08:26 PM

I thought only Danish oils contained a resin. Didn’t know Tung and Teak did too.
That’s why I’m asking hear.

So is linseed oil my only option (other than paint) if I don’t want to strip this door every 5 years ?

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Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#8 posted 09-27-2019 08:34 PM


I thought only Danish oils contained a resin. Didn’t know Tung and Teak did too.
That’s why I’m asking hear.

So is linseed oil my only option (other than paint) if I don’t want to strip this door every 5 years ?

- Steveandzero

You’re not alone in the confusion about tung oil. There’s pure tung oil and then there are products from Minwax and others labeled “tung oil finish.” The tung oil finish contains resins and absolutely zero real tung oil.

Pure tung oil will be labeled pure and contains no resins, but costs more than boiled linseed oil, which you already know you like and are familiar with.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

429 posts in 83 days


#9 posted 09-27-2019 08:52 PM

Pure tung oil will be labeled pure and contains no resins, but costs more than boiled linseed oil, which you already know you like and are familiar with.

- Rich

I was going to post a warning about “so-called” tung oil finishes that contain little or no tung oil, but Rich is on the ball as always, and while I was out eating, he made the point. Pure tung oil can sometimes be labelled “crude,” same with pure linseed oil. Personally, I dont use boiled linseed oil, only crude, or pure. Difference is drying time, and the additives that reduce it. This is why I always add some % cut of M.S. to help speed up drying time somewhat. Such is not to be confused with “curing.”

It wont be a simple thing to find pure tung oil, nor pure linseed oil for that matter. I am in Spain, so cant really speak as to where to go to get either of these items. I go to a quality paint supplier, who supplies contractors, and even there I have to special order pure tung oil.

IMO, if you use linseed oil, at best, you will have to reapply every 2 years, but if you want to maintain these doors well, every year is better.

And you probably know this, but be sure to wipe off all excess after application, or you will end up with sticky goo wherever it pools.

Re: sanding. If I were doing this job, and I am glad I am not! I would sand after removing the old finish, and then really only concentrate where the hand will touch. Then I would apply two coats of oil, waiting about three days between. I wouldnt sand between coats unless I felt some grain raised, with maybe 320grit, again, only where the hands are likely to touch.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

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Rich

5001 posts in 1125 days


#10 posted 09-27-2019 09:29 PM


Personally, I dont use boiled linseed oil, only crude, or pure. Difference is drying time, and the additives that reduce it. This is why I always add some % cut of M.S. to help speed up drying time somewhat. Such is not to be confused with “curing.”

- wildwoodbybrianjohns

That’s interesting, Brian. When I hear linseed oil I immediately think of BLO, which, of course, isn’t boiled at all. I wasn’t aware anyone used pure linseed oil anymore.

One thing I do when I use pure oils is add some Japan drier, which does speed the actual curing rate. It’s a lead-free metallic drying agent. Just a milliliter per ounce of oil is all it takes.

I did a test with some pure tung oil cut 50% with citrus solvent some time ago. In the photo below you can see the effect two hours after adding the Japan drier. On the left is untreated oil, on the right is the oil with drier added. Even the next morning the untreated oil was still wet. BTW this is also how you can tell the difference between an oil and a finish. Oil wrinkles up on a smooth surface like metal or glass, while finish forms a smooth film.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

429 posts in 83 days


#11 posted 09-27-2019 10:43 PM

Yeah, Rich, if you go through my posts youll notice I write L.O., not B.L.O. I have heard of japan drier before, but for the life of me I cant recall in relation to what? Possibly as an additive to tung oil or linseed oil, but not sure. I have watched alot of Paul Sellers youtube stuff, maybe it was he who mentioned it???

Anyhow, linseed oil is a very common wood treatment in scandinavia, and thats where I picked up the habit. They have an old-school paint for exterior use on wood that is unrivalled, IMO, called linoliemaling- translated- linseed oil paint. Traditionally, there were only a handful of colors, dark forest green being the most popular. Theres no matte, semi, gloss variants, only the one finish which is silky glossy. This is not a paint for amateurs to be messin with, it has to be applied really really really thin with a brush, and it takes forever to cure, like months, and does to a degree become interlocked with the wood. One great feature of this paint, because of its long open time, is that you can work back into it as need be with virtually no drag. Because it is so thin though, brush marks are common and can only be eliminated by subsequent coats. Of course, eventually it does fail if the wood is consistenly damp, but no modern paint comes close to its longevity.

I used to shrug despondently when a customer requested I use it, but then smile as I calculated the markup.

Sorry for the off-topic rant. A little info is never a bad thing:))

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

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Steveandzero

5 posts in 48 days


#12 posted 09-28-2019 01:30 AM

Thank you all for your help so far!!!
I found some 100% pure oil online. I’ll pick up some mineral spirits as well. Couldn’t find Japan drier.
I can run a few test to see what % mixture works best. Where should I start? 50-50 mix?

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/pyipa8u.jpg!

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Snipes

437 posts in 2781 days


#13 posted 09-28-2019 04:00 AM

Odies

-- if it is to be it is up to me

View SMP's profile

SMP

1420 posts in 441 days


#14 posted 09-28-2019 05:21 AM



Thank you all for your help so far!!!
I found some 100% pure oil online. I’ll pick up some mineral spirits as well. Couldn’t find Japan drier.
I can run a few test to see what % mixture works best. Where should I start? 50-50 mix?

https://s3.amazonaws.com/vs-lumberjocks.com/pyipa8u.jpg!

- Steveandzero

You can actually get japan drier at most big box stores, they have it at HD, Lowes, even Walmart, gun and outdoor stores have it to as its often used for stocks.

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

429 posts in 83 days


#15 posted 09-28-2019 08:38 AM

50/50 is standard mix.

Rubio monocoat also has a hybrid oil for exterior use, but I havent used it. Non-toxic, odor-free, one coat application, no sanding required, supposedly protects against rot. They market it as a “green” product, so no petroleum additives. I think its about 10$ per quart in the US. I know those who use Rubio swear by it and use only that. I think that “whispering” guy is a fan.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

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