LumberJocks

Glue is the bane of my existence

  • Advertise with us

« back to Finishing forum

Forum topic by nickbatz posted 09-26-2019 08:32 PM 882 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

622 posts in 999 days


09-26-2019 08:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: finishing

Stray glue and glue line problems.

I’m finishing a red oak composer’s desk with Watco Black Walnut oil/varnish. The first one I did this way came out so well – eventually – that my current client requested the same for his desk.

But the glue marks are driving me up the wall.

So far I’ve had to sand one section down to bare wood and start over. After that I took extra care to sand the bejesus out of the rest of the desk. And even then there are still some areas I need to fix, places I couldn’t see where the dark oil wouldn’t penetrate.

Suggestions for both prevention and curing are welcome.

I read somewhere that black light shows the glue. Is that true? Water (to raise the grain before final sanding) doesn’t.

TIA

Picture from the previous desk – the blotches on this one are bigger.


21 replies so far

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4149 posts in 2141 days


#1 posted 09-26-2019 08:41 PM

A wipe down with mineral spirits before finishing will show areas of glue smear. Titebond also makes a glue with some fluorescing agent that glows under a blacklight (UV) allowing one to spot areas to clean up.

For glue blotch prevention, keep the amount used under control and don’t let gluey fingers touch surfaces intended to be finished. I like to use wax around areas that have the potential for squeeze out (M&T joints are a biggie). The wax lets the glue peel right off then I clean off the wax with mineral spirits.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6166 posts in 1508 days


#2 posted 09-26-2019 08:53 PM


Titebond also makes a glue with some fluorescing agent that glows under a blacklight (UV) allowing one to spot areas to clean up.

- splintergroup

Awesome stuff. I did a blog post about it a year and a half ago. I still use it anytime I use PVA glue (hide glue fluoresces as well and I use a lot of that) and it’s saved my butt so many times. Since it costs more, I mix it 50/50 with regular Titebond II and it still fluoresces just fine. You can get an UV flashlight on Amazon for about $10 and they sell the glue as well.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

622 posts in 999 days


#3 posted 09-26-2019 10:25 PM

Thanks, great advice.

Splintergroup, do you just use regular paste wax?

View DS's profile

DS

3590 posts in 3339 days


#4 posted 09-26-2019 11:21 PM

Glue with care…

Sanding glue off the face of a project sucks.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1526 posts in 3680 days


#5 posted 09-26-2019 11:37 PM

Try using a single edge razor blade (www.harborfreight.com/100-piece-industrial-quality-single-edge-utility-blades-39748.html) as a scraper. It will remove the finish and take you back to the wood surface, but will nicely remove the glue.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8621 posts in 3717 days


#6 posted 09-27-2019 05:05 AM

Switch to hide glue and kiss the problem goodbye.
Only one of its advantages. .... don’t get me started….

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Rich's profile

Rich

6166 posts in 1508 days


#7 posted 09-27-2019 05:14 AM


don’t get me started….

- shipwright

I’ll pitch in… It washes out of your clothes. It’s very friendly to finishes. And the biggie, it’s reversible, so if you screw up, not that we ever do, you can recover.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4149 posts in 2141 days


#8 posted 09-27-2019 03:35 PM



Thanks, great advice.

Splintergroup, do you just use regular paste wax?

- nickbatz

I still use Waxilit quite a bit (it’s thicker), but I have used paste wax often with success. For joints, I’ll dry assemble, then wipe on a good coat into all the corners, etc. near the glue area. I don’t remove any of the wax before gluing.

After the joint is dry, I’ll wipe down with a cloth to remove most of the wax, then use a mineral sprits soaked rag to remove the rest. With Waxilit, I’ll often use a MS soaked old tooth brush to assure it is removed from all the wood pores (esp. oak). It is a bit more stubborn than paste wax.

View PPK's profile

PPK

1814 posts in 1728 days


#9 posted 09-27-2019 04:10 PM

+1 to the use of hide glue.

Splinter, using wax just seems like it’s asking for problems come finish time… have you ever run into issues with wax preventing stain penetration? I’ve never tried it before, and I’m curious.

-- Pete

View Madmark2's profile

Madmark2

1828 posts in 1507 days


#10 posted 09-27-2019 04:28 PM

Limit the amount of glue. I use a piece of scrap lexan as a spreader. This makes it easy to see as you smooth the glue into 100% coverage of a thin layer. It also helps keep glue off the fingers.

Keep a wet rag handy to wipe off the squeeze out off as you glue and clean as you go.

M

-- The hump with the stump and the pump!

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

4149 posts in 2141 days


#11 posted 09-27-2019 05:00 PM



+1 to the use of hide glue.

Splinter, using wax just seems like it s asking for problems come finish time… have you ever run into issues with wax preventing stain penetration? I ve never tried it before, and I m curious.

- PPK

No problems at all, but I’m careful to clean the wax away. I should mention that of course any wax with silicones is a no-no (i.e. car waxes). I’ve tested what happens to a bare wood surface that I waxed with paste wax, then wiped it away like one would when waxing a finished project. A followup with danish oil revealed no wax problems, probably due to the solvents in the oil clearing away the wax.

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

622 posts in 999 days


#12 posted 09-27-2019 10:36 PM

Thanks for all the tips.

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

622 posts in 999 days


#13 posted 10-01-2019 06:47 PM

Hey, opening this up again: you can’t get mineral spirits in California. Is there a good substitute that will show glue?

Hide glue looks interesting, but it’s unclear to me whether it’s appropriate for edge-joining.

Thanks.

View Rich's profile

Rich

6166 posts in 1508 days


#14 posted 10-01-2019 06:56 PM


Hey, opening this up again: you can t get mineral spirits in California. Is there a good substitute that will show glue?

Hide glue looks interesting, but it s unclear to me whether it s appropriate for edge-joining.

Thanks.

- nickbatz

Naphtha, paint thinner or turpentine will all work just fine. You can also order the Titebond II with the fluorescent dye and not worry about any of that. Just order a cheap UV flashlight off of Amazon and you’ll be able to detect glue residue better than any solvent can make possible.

Hide glue is appropriate for any wood gluing. Issues with open time, etc, and how to deal with them are too involved to cover here.

Paul (shipwright) who commented earlier in this thread, has an eight-part blog series on hide glue for beginners that’s worth reading. Honestly, once you experience the benefits of hide glue, liquid hide glue, and other protein glues, you’ll wonder how you ever got by without them.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

622 posts in 999 days


#15 posted 10-01-2019 06:58 PM

Thanks Rich.

showing 1 through 15 of 21 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com