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Big slabs. I said "never again" but.....

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Forum topic by Andybb posted 09-25-2019 02:27 AM 921 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Andybb

2785 posts in 1411 days


09-25-2019 02:27 AM

I have this gorgeous dining table sized maple slab that was given to me but it’s a little cupped. I know from experience that either hand planing or using a router sled is a laborious and torturous process. I swore I was done doing big slabs but this thing is gorgeous and free. My first inclination to avoid flattening it by hand or router is to just take it to the mill and pay them $100 to run it through their mac daddy drum sander. I’m thinking that’s the way to lose the least amount of thickness. It’s something I can sell for a pretty penny and want it to be perfect. It’s about 8.5’ x 3.5’.

Suggestions?

-- Andy - Seattle USA


15 replies so far

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SMP

2262 posts in 714 days


#1 posted 09-25-2019 02:42 AM

I would check the mill, last I checked the place near me was only about $25 for something that size.

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Andybb

2785 posts in 1411 days


#2 posted 09-25-2019 02:47 AM

Actually I was rounding up. I think they are $80/hr with an hour minimum. $25 would be awesome but it costs $25 to just get in the door here in Seattle. I’d easily pay the $80 min. Just trying to figure out if I’m being lazy. I’ve done enough of them to know I just don’t want the aggravation and saw dust. If I was going to keep it I might do it myself just to be able to say I did while eating at the table but not if I am going to sell it. Done right it’s a $2K table around these parts especially if it’s from locally grown timber. People here love that stuff.

I may have answered my own question. :-)

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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tblank

81 posts in 3778 days


#3 posted 09-25-2019 03:12 AM

I’d say if it was a hobby or a fun pastime it maybe considered “lazy”. But, if it a for profit project, then having it milled is not only a time saver but smart. Your labor would be much more than a milling fee.

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Andybb

2785 posts in 1411 days


#4 posted 09-25-2019 03:24 AM


I d say if it was a hobby or a fun pastime it maybe considered “lazy”. But, if it a for profit project, then having it milled is not only a time saver but smart. Your labor would be much more than a milling fee.

- tblank


My thoughts exactly. I’ve had the “fun” experience. I’m over that. :-)

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Andybb

2785 posts in 1411 days


#5 posted 09-25-2019 03:33 AM



its look like suar woos is it suar wood ?

- teaklight


Looking at your profile I think all of your posts are in violation of the rules of this site.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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SMP

2262 posts in 714 days


#6 posted 09-25-2019 04:56 AM


its look like suar woos is it suar wood ?

- teaklight

Looking at your profile I think all of your posts are in violation of the rules of this site.

- Andybb

I did the same and reported

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therealSteveN

5958 posts in 1382 days


#7 posted 09-25-2019 06:12 AM

Not seeing him here anymore, evidently poofed. I chased at one the other day did about a dozen posts smearing Ted’s Woodstealing all over every thread he entered.

That thing has conference written all over it. Yeah have that done, as you implied likely less net loss.

-- Think safe, be safe

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TEK73

289 posts in 515 days


#8 posted 09-25-2019 06:27 AM

If it’s for profit it should be a easy evaluation:
Expected time doing it yourself your wage per hour
Vs
(Expected time you will use to get it milled
hour wage pr
Hour )+ $80
(Depending on a lot of other facors you should maybe consider tax effects and so on, but mets keep it simpel)

So, it it takes you one 10 hour day to do it by hand or sled, and you value yourself $40/hour thats $400
You probably use two hours getting it to/from the mill, so that would add up to 40*2+80 =$160

So, $160 to get it millled vs $400 to do it yourself. A no brainer!

But of course – if you value your own time to $10 you will get a different result.
You could a actually put it all into a calculation sheet and make two graphs, and the crossing point would tell what minimum value tou should put on hour time for it to be resonable to take it to the mill.

But of course, all this is really just bull – and I’m quite sure your gut-feeling already have the answare for you ;-)

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

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JayT

6402 posts in 3019 days


#9 posted 09-25-2019 12:43 PM

Free + $100 = $100 invested for a flattened slab + time to take to the mill.

If I was needing a slab, I’d pay far more than that for one of that size that was already flat, so sounds like a win. Only other real option if you aren’t going to keep it is to sell as is. Most purchasers of slabs that size have means to flatten.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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Jim Jakosh

24979 posts in 3913 days


#10 posted 09-25-2019 01:59 PM

Wow that is sure a wide slam…great table size and FREE!!!!!!!!! You can afford to spend a little on the flattening. How dry is it..like will it still move for a while? You don’t want to have to flatten it twice.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

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pottz

10361 posts in 1792 days


#11 posted 09-25-2019 03:10 PM

andy your right that is way too much work to bother with,so considering it’s already in your truck just haul it over to my shop and ill get rid of it for ya.always willing to help out another jock buddy-lol.

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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Andybb

2785 posts in 1411 days


#12 posted 09-25-2019 03:30 PM


How dry is it..like will it still move for a while? You don t want to have to flatten it twice.

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


Good point. Might finally be time to buy a moisture meter.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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pottz

10361 posts in 1792 days


#13 posted 09-25-2019 03:32 PM


How dry is it..like will it still move for a while? You don t want to have to flatten it twice.

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Good point. Might finally be time to buy a moisture meter.

- Andybb


andy ive got one so when you bring it over we can check it :)

-- working with my hands is a joy,it gives me a sense of fulfillment,somthing so many seek and so few find.-SAM MALOOF.

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GR8HUNTER

7672 posts in 1520 days


#14 posted 09-25-2019 03:50 PM

i could not even lift this piece :<(((( GREAT SCORE FOR FREE :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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mjheck

37 posts in 1958 days


#15 posted 09-27-2019 06:46 AM

Seeing you’re in Seattle, I’d check with Bruce Blacker at WildEdge Woods, in Oso, on the way to Darrington on Route 530. He has 52” dual head drum sander and can have a piece like that sanded for you in about an hour while you wait. I have had several slabs sanded by him and his partner Ron over the years. They’re interesting guys and fun to BS with. Bruce’s # is 360 631 9212. Quite an interesting operation, too.

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