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Forum topic by Redoak49 posted 09-22-2019 02:51 PM 411 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Redoak49

4190 posts in 2502 days


09-22-2019 02:51 PM

I am building some book shelves with Red Oak and using 18 ga brads in places. I want to fill the holes before finishing. I will be staining with oil based stain and will use oil based poly.

What can I use that will take the stain and not be very visible?


15 replies so far

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6664 posts in 3707 days


#1 posted 09-22-2019 03:09 PM

Go to Lowes or Home Depot and pick up a bottle or tube of oak wood filler….Push a small amount of filler into the nail hole, let it set until it starts looking dry. Wipe off excess with a damp rag (don’t wipe all of the filler out). Once dry, sand lightly till the filler looks like it disappears….The hole is filled, so stain or paint your project….!!

-- " The secret to staying young looking.....hang around old people.." R.D.

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bilyo

856 posts in 1616 days


#2 posted 09-22-2019 03:24 PM

+1. I would only add the suggestion that you do some tests on scrap. Sometimes your stain will color the filler differently. You may want to adjust the color of the filler.

An alternative is to put some sanding dust into the nail hole and then put a drop of super glue (not gel) on top. Let it set a few seconds and then sand it smooth.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1364 posts in 2465 days


#3 posted 09-22-2019 03:35 PM

I would use Timbermate if I had to use anything.

Why use the brads in the first place?

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Redoak49

4190 posts in 2502 days


#4 posted 09-22-2019 09:43 PM

I am using the brads to speed assembly of attaching strips to the front and back of the shelves.

I used the Sagulator to calculate the size of the strips to minimize sag.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1364 posts in 2465 days


#5 posted 09-22-2019 09:54 PM



I am using the brads to speed assembly of attaching strips to the front and back of the shelves.

I used the Sagulator to calculate the size of the strips to minimize sag.

- Redoak49

That is a great way to keep the shelves from sagging and the visual effect of the wider piece is a good design decision. A good combination is a plywood shelf with solid wood for the facing strips. If you cut rabbets in the strips you do not need a whole lot to keep them attached to the shelf pieces during glue up. A few pin nails or even strips of blue painter’s tape would suffice and would probably not require any filler. My concern is that you will have a line of filled brad holes that will be readily apparent.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

53 posts in 110 days


#6 posted 09-22-2019 10:35 PM

What color stain?

Might think about a color matched china marker to keep around for after finishing…

As for filling, I am a fan of Timbermate. You can get colored versions. You can also try the white and stain on a test piece.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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GR8HUNTER

6458 posts in 1226 days


#7 posted 09-22-2019 11:18 PM

i always had very good luck with Famowood just my 1 cent YMMV :<)))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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JayT

6296 posts in 2724 days


#8 posted 09-22-2019 11:24 PM


An alternative is to put some sanding dust into the nail hole and then put a drop of super glue (not gel) on top. Let it set a few seconds and then sand it smooth.

- bilyo

This is what I do to fill small holes or gaps, though generally let it set more than a few seconds. It works well.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View Toller's profile

Toller

43 posts in 2113 days


#9 posted 09-22-2019 11:53 PM

Since you will never get a perfect match, go darker. It is much less visible then if it comes out lighter.

‘Timbermate is good stuff.

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4190 posts in 2502 days


#10 posted 09-23-2019 12:22 AM


If you cut rabbets in the strips you do not need a whole lot to keep them attached to the shelf pieces during glue up. A few pin nails or even strips of blue painter s tape would suffice and would probably not require any filler. My concern is that you will have a line of filled brad holes that will be readily apparent.

- Kazooman

I am gluing up long pieces of hardwood ply with edging strips front and back. No matter What you do, the plywood always has a bit of a curve. I have red oak strips for font and back. Even though they were perfectly straight when I cut them they also have various curves. Blue tape will not be enough…I have I have tried that. I am using a spline and need the brads. I could put a zillion clamps but decided on the brads. I have made a lot of book cases and the brads will be fine and not visible in this application.

View mel52's profile

mel52

1040 posts in 778 days


#11 posted 09-23-2019 02:45 AM

I’m with a few of the others on using Timbermate. Has always worked for me, ( so far ). Mel

-- MEL, Kansas

View SMP's profile

SMP

1401 posts in 419 days


#12 posted 09-23-2019 03:44 AM

I like famowood and timbermate. But the only problem i have w famowood is the 2nd or 3d time i go to use it the can has hardened. The timbermate you can just add more water if needed.

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Redoak49

4190 posts in 2502 days


#13 posted 09-23-2019 01:05 PM

Thank you all. I am ordering some Timbermate and will do some trials with it.

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6458 posts in 1226 days


#14 posted 09-23-2019 01:47 PM

famowood makes a GR8 solvent to soften up old cans you can also use acetone, Methyl Ethyl Ketone, naphtha :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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Bill_Steele

573 posts in 2245 days


#15 posted 09-23-2019 03:10 PM

I think it is likely that no matter what you use to fill the 18g nail holes, you will still see some evidence of them after staining. Some people have good luck using glue and sawdust (from the same wood species). I like Timbermate and would suggest you try that filler. Maybe get a few different colors and mix them to get the right color. If possible I would suggest using a pin nailer (23g) because it leaves a much smaller hole.

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