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Small Shop layout suggestions

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Forum topic by Clobby posted 09-20-2019 09:32 PM 457 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Clobby

23 posts in 1085 days


09-20-2019 09:32 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Current setup
  • 1-1/2 car garage that measures 15’9” wide by 19’9” deep in a rental.
  • Circuit 3 @ 15A powers lights with just under 3A (350w) of lighting of constant load while in shop
  • All large power tools on mobile bases
Goals
  • Re-arrange/find space for a hybrid/contractor saw with max 30” rip
Challenges/limitations
  • No more wall space
  • Circuits/outlets not optimal by any stretch
  • ACS3000 needs to be able to loaded into truck, and somewhat easily be put, or kept in a place to easily unload and break down plywood from bed of truck onto ACS3000

I’m thinking realistically of integrated the table saw into the ACS3000 setup I have, something along the lines of integrating it into the infeed/assembly table combo I already have (obviously rebuilding it all). The other option is re-arranging the tools on the right to allow room for the table saw which I can slide out when I need it. I’m very open to other ideas, including but not limited to, rearranging the right and rear walls of the shop completely.

I’m not interested in rearranging the left side, at least as far as the auto tools go because I do work on the family’s cars semi routinely. I would consider moving the miter saw station to the right side however, but not crazy about it.

-- Wood working newbie, IT Pro for 15 years, ask away for computer help to help repay all the noob wood working questions.


9 replies so far

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

53 posts in 110 days


#1 posted 09-21-2019 01:37 AM

I set up my new 1 car garage shop with my table saw closest to the door… It’s a little shy of 4 feet from the inside of the roll up door. But, I don’t have to get around it to put anything in my truck any more.

My thought process was that I would (and have been) bringing home sheet goods, and breaking them down outside on saw horses. Next step is usually cleaning up the cuts and cutting to closer dimensions, or final sizes.

I have my outfeed/assembly table behind the table saw (duh). I spend a lot of time sitting on a stool, or standing at the outfeed table, opposite of my table saw. It’s become my defacto workbench., really.

My best idea is to put the ACS first. You have a little more width than I have. So, you could possibly run your table saw East/West as opposed to North/South, maybe? Although, I am not sure how wide the ACS300 is, could you cheat the TS to one side, and leave a wide enough path to get it around the TS out to the truck?

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

481 posts in 2889 days


#2 posted 09-21-2019 02:22 AM

Clobby,

I see a band saw along one wall. With that and a couple of hand saws you have everything needed to break lumber down. Get the bench off the wall and center your shop around the bench and the use of hand tools. When and if you get more room and you still think you need power tools then add ‘em to the mix.

ken

View hairy's profile

hairy

2935 posts in 4045 days


#3 posted 09-21-2019 03:19 AM

Something to try: https://www.grizzly.com/workshopplanner

-- Genghis Khan and his brother Don, couldn't keep on keeping on...

View jacww's profile

jacww

43 posts in 1520 days


#4 posted 09-21-2019 01:38 PM

Clobby,

Here’s a short video of what may be the ultimate small shop. It may give you some ideas about REALLY compact tool storage. Perhaps you can make more wall space by consolidating your tool storage.

May not be an answer for you, but it is a fascinating video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCtRWwvGHeY

TonyC

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

436 posts in 1689 days


#5 posted 09-21-2019 02:16 PM

That’s a great video, Tony. Thanks for posting.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

View Clobby's profile

Clobby

23 posts in 1085 days


#6 posted 09-21-2019 06:47 PM


My best idea is to put the ACS first. You have a little more width than I have. So, you could possibly run your table saw East/West as opposed to North/South, maybe? Although, I am not sure how wide the ACS300 is, could you cheat the TS to one side, and leave a wide enough path to get it around the TS out to the truck?

- Axis39

The ACS is wide enough that there’s not much room already to walk around it without hitting the track that extends past the table (as shown by the blue rectangle). If I put the table saw facing E/W it’d be difficult to get the lawnmower out potentially, unless I rebuilt the infeed/worktable currently setup with the track horse. Unfortunately the track horse is a fixed width, so I’d end up having to put that up in storage (which I’m not against per se).


May not be an answer for you, but it is a fascinating video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gCtRWwvGHeY

TonyC

- jacww

Funnily enough, I JUST watched that prior to posting this video. I got a couple of ideas, but not anything to really solve my conundrum.


Clobby,

I see a band saw along one wall. With that and a couple of hand saws you have everything needed to break lumber down. Get the bench off the wall and center your shop around the bench and the use of hand tools. When and if you get more room and you still think you need power tools then add em to the mix.

ken

- BubbaIBA

Ken, as much as I appreciate the idea of converting mostly to hand tools, when I tried to this past winter I just didn’t enjoy it. I appreciate the idea and love watching peoples videos, but I’m a gearhead at heart, and love working with tools and motors. That’s what gets me out in the shop, for better or worse.

-- Wood working newbie, IT Pro for 15 years, ask away for computer help to help repay all the noob wood working questions.

View JayT's profile

JayT

6296 posts in 2724 days


#7 posted 09-22-2019 01:22 AM

My first thought reading your post was, “Where’s the small shop?”, my shop is 110 sq ft. :-)

With limited size, you have to make compromises. Even if you don’t want to go more hand tools, what exactly do you need a table saw to do that you can’t already do with the band saw, ACS and a router?

Just because most people use a table saw doesn’t mean it’s the right solution for everyone. Michael Fortune, a professional woodworker and furniture builder in Canada doesn’t own a table saw, he uses a band saw centric shop. I followed that path a few years ago due to space constraints, selling my table saw. It’s #1 purpose in my shop was ripping and I can do that on the band saw, it’s just a little slower and requires a bit more clean up, but that’s the compromise for the sake of space. Add the functionality of the ACS, jointer, miter saw and a router and I’m hard pressed to see any process you can’t accomplish without a table saw.

If you do decide you need a table saw, maybe the compromise is to leave the ACS folded up and stored most of the time, just getting it out when needed.

Best of luck with whatever you decide.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View anthm27's profile

anthm27

1426 posts in 1623 days


#8 posted 09-22-2019 02:42 AM

That is Definitely no small shop. Oh how i wish I had that space.
Mine is 10.8 square feet. OK yes i do work outside also.
I store the lumber downstairs in my old kitchen.

-- To be a true artist one must stick to their own thought process

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2246 posts in 2542 days


#9 posted 09-22-2019 05:09 AM

#1: consider having one of those ceiling mount 50’ electrical reels. That will solve any electrical reach problem for time being. #2: think 3 dimensional. My 15” planer outfeed height is 1” above table saw table height. My table saw height is 3” lower than my floating torsion box miter station. My jointer outfeed will be 1” above my soon-to-be finished Roubo workbench height. #3: you possibly could do a flip-top cart with the drill press & planer. Did it with my 13” Rigid planer and 10” delta drill press. #4: could add bench over jointer. Just need to slide jointer out to use it. #5: I see tons of wall space available too. Consider french cleats everywhere

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

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