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Forum topic by bbandu posted 09-19-2019 06:34 PM 380 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbandu

115 posts in 2056 days


09-19-2019 06:34 PM

I have read alot of different things about rust prevention on the boards. I have a question about paste wax, everything I have read says apply it to help protect against rust.

How is everyone applying it, by hand with a rag and then using some sort of buffer to polish the surface?

What have you found to be the best way to apply?


17 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

6295 posts in 2723 days


#1 posted 09-19-2019 06:45 PM

I use 0000 steel wool to apply—it holds a good amount of wax and will remove any small spots of surface rust at the same time. Just a rag to buff off. No reason to need a power buffer.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View bbandu's profile

bbandu

115 posts in 2056 days


#2 posted 09-19-2019 06:47 PM



I use 0000 steel wool to apply—it holds a good amount of wax and will remove any small spots of surface rust at the same time. Just a rag to buff off. No reason to need a power buffer.

- JayT

Thanks

View Monty151's profile

Monty151

83 posts in 353 days


#3 posted 09-19-2019 07:37 PM

I’ve not tried it with the steel wool. I just use a shop rag to spread it really thin. Let it set for about 15 min then polish it off with a clean rag. This reminds me that I have to do my TS top today.

Good luck

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5756 posts in 3005 days


#4 posted 09-19-2019 07:44 PM

Yeah, the wipe on/wipe off (after letting it set up) is what I do.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10948 posts in 1650 days


#5 posted 09-19-2019 08:19 PM



I use 0000 steel wool to apply—it holds a good amount of wax and will remove any small spots of surface rust at the same time. Just a rag to buff off. No reason to need a power buffer.

- JayT

+1

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4190 posts in 2500 days


#6 posted 09-19-2019 08:38 PM

+1 on steel wool

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3977 posts in 1899 days


#7 posted 09-19-2019 09:11 PM

If you don’t see any rust, the steel wool seems like overkill. You don’t need much wax because you are going to buff most of it off anyway. The more wax you put on, the longer you have to wait before buffing it. All you need is to see a slight haze. I keep a coarse shop rag in the wax tin and simply make sure it feels loaded and give it a quick wipe down and buff it with a similar coarse rage about 5 minutes later.

BTW, if you store green wood in your shop, you need to be extra diligent with your CI maintenance. I’ve seen it cause the CI to rust in a few weeks. In fact, you might want to add a dehumidifier if you have a significant amount of green wood in your shop.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1892 posts in 2006 days


#8 posted 09-19-2019 09:33 PM

I use generic brand plastic scuff pads (3m – Scotch Brite) instead of steel wool.

Use white (~1000 grit or 0000 steel wool equivalent) for general cast iron touch ups, and the folded pad stays in wax can when not being used. Using white pad helps me to know if I really scuffing oxides off the surface, and getting wax into pores; as the excess wax turns grey on pad.

For minor sweat drops starting to blacken, use a Gray pad (~600 grit) and remove rust and wax same time.

If I find a spot of heavy surface rust, or pitting; and above don’t work, I use the red or green pad.
The challenge with maroon/green is different mfg has slightly different grits for these colors. For 3M, the green is 600 grit, and red/maroon is 320-400. For generic unbranded stuff, the seem to be reversed with maroon pad being a medium grit, and green being course grit.

Remove the wax/buff out surface with regular cotton shop rag. Wax residue needs to be slightly hard to remove, or you are pushing around wet wax and leave a much thinner film on surface.

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3641 posts in 2369 days


#9 posted 09-19-2019 10:16 PM

I use the green scrubbing pads for dishes. Then after applying I use a shop rag to remove the excess.

View bbandu's profile

bbandu

115 posts in 2056 days


#10 posted 09-20-2019 12:13 PM



If you don t see any rust, the steel wool seems like overkill. You don t need much wax because you are going to buff most of it off anyway. The more wax you put on, the longer you have to wait before buffing it. All you need is to see a slight haze. I keep a coarse shop rag in the wax tin and simply make sure it feels loaded and give it a quick wipe down and buff it with a similar coarse rage about 5 minutes later.

BTW, if you store green wood in your shop, you need to be extra diligent with your CI maintenance. I ve seen it cause the CI to rust in a few weeks. In fact, you might want to add a dehumidifier if you have a significant amount of green wood in your shop.

- Lazyman

My shop is my garage, and I live in Florida so I will always have to deal with rust. I really don’t store alot of green wood.

View bbandu's profile

bbandu

115 posts in 2056 days


#11 posted 09-20-2019 12:17 PM



I use generic brand plastic scuff pads (3m – Scotch Brite) instead of steel wool.

Use white (~1000 grit or 0000 steel wool equivalent) for general cast iron touch ups, and the folded pad stays in wax can when not being used. Using white pad helps me to know if I really scuffing oxides off the surface, and getting wax into pores; as the excess wax turns grey on pad.

For minor sweat drops starting to blacken, use a Gray pad (~600 grit) and remove rust and wax same time.

If I find a spot of heavy surface rust, or pitting; and above don t work, I use the red or green pad.
The challenge with maroon/green is different mfg has slightly different grits for these colors. For 3M, the green is 600 grit, and red/maroon is 320-400. For generic unbranded stuff, the seem to be reversed with maroon pad being a medium grit, and green being course grit.

Remove the wax/buff out surface with regular cotton shop rag. Wax residue needs to be slightly hard to remove, or you are pushing around wet wax and leave a much thinner film on surface.

YMMV

- CaptainKlutz

Thanks, Did not know that the 3M scrub pads actually related to different grits.

View bbandu's profile

bbandu

115 posts in 2056 days


#12 posted 09-20-2019 12:41 PM



I use the green scrubbing pads for dishes. Then after applying I use a shop rag to remove the excess.

- diverlloyd

Thanks

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

359 posts in 2246 days


#13 posted 09-20-2019 12:53 PM

I just use an old tshirt to apply the wax. I keep it folded up in the can with the wax. Then I use another old tshirt to remove the excess after 10-15 minutes. I might bust out the polisher if I’m feeling frisky.

I use a combo of WD-40 and a green scotch brite pad on my ROS to remove rust and any waxy build up.

I made a youtube video that shows the whole process, if you’re interested.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View bbandu's profile

bbandu

115 posts in 2056 days


#14 posted 09-20-2019 01:09 PM



I just use an old tshirt to apply the wax. I keep it folded up in the can with the wax. Then I use another old tshirt to remove the excess after 10-15 minutes. I might bust out the polisher if I m feeling frisky.

I use a combo of WD-40 and a green scotch brite pad on my ROS to remove rust and any waxy build up.

I made a youtube video that shows the whole process, if you re interested.

- Tony1212

Thanks for the education on removing rust and applying the wax.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1892 posts in 2006 days


#15 posted 09-20-2019 06:32 PM


I use a combo of WD-40 and a green scotch brite pad on my ROS to remove rust and any waxy build up.
- Tony1212

Since paste wax is; wax dissolved in petroleum solvents, unless rust has been there for long time and started to create pitting; the extra step of using WD40 is simply adding more work. IMHO.

FWIW – on topic of rust removal and prevention:

If you live in a place where tools rust quick (due high humidity and condensation issues), preventing moisture from condensing on the cast iron is required. Simple blanket, wood, or cardboard cover between uses, and maybe an air circulation fan will save a lot of rust clean up time.

Furthermore:
When your neglected cast iron has developed rust in pores (yes, cast iron has pores due excess carbon); suggest sealing the pores by converting cancerous red iron oxide rust to black oxide. It is best solution to reducing cast iron maintenance.
I use one several similar spray products: Loctite Extend, Permatex Rest Treatment, or Duplicolor Rust Destroying coating from the local auto parts store. They have a compound that converts red rust to black oxide, and leaves behind a thin polymer film. The products are intended to be used a primer under paint, and since I don’t want film on my cast iron, use a different application method.
:First I scrape excess rust.
:Maybe use wd40 and coarse pad to remove any remaining surface rust.
:Deep clean with chlorinated brake cleaner to remove all wax and oils.
:Lightly spray rust convertor on surface, and use gray buffing pad to work it into pores. Wiping majority of excess off the surface with paper towel.
:When it has dried in 1-2 hours, I wax using same white pad as normal. It removes any film on top of the cast iron, but leaves pores sealed.

I repeat this treatment on cast iron any time I see rust forming in the pores of cast iron top, or if neglect has generated pitting. Did it once year living in Midwest states, and ~2-3 years or after any cast iron surface restoration here in Arizona. Thanks to this ‘sealing treatment’, the only rust issues I find are due highly alkaline sweat drops left on tools while being used.
YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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