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Best way to add a groove to a table apron

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Forum topic by knotscott posted 09-16-2019 11:25 PM 705 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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knotscott

8334 posts in 3885 days


09-16-2019 11:25 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi gang – I’m currently working on a table for my oldest son and his wife. The table apron has a groove detail roughly 1/2” above an arch at the bottom of the apron. Maybe I’m getting old, but I’m drawing blanks on the best way to accomplish that. The radius of the arch looks too tight for an edge guide. Thoughts and ideas? See the pic below for an illustration of what I want to do.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....


19 replies so far

View LeeRoyMan's profile

LeeRoyMan

284 posts in 237 days


#1 posted 09-16-2019 11:43 PM

You may have to take a piece of scratch stock and file your own design. Do it by hand.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

742 posts in 421 days


#2 posted 09-17-2019 12:01 AM

The way I’ve done it was before you glue the rails on, make another rail for the pattern, use hot glue or clamp or two sided tape to attach to the rails you want the accent flute, use a small hand held router with a pattern bit such as a “90 degree V-Groove pattern bit” like the Grizzly #C1659. or a the “Core Box pattern bit” like the Grizzly #C1661. If you have a bearing set, you could put a 1/4 inside diameter bearing onto a “Engraving Bit” with a 1/4” shaft, such as a 30 degree or 45 degree engraving bit that Whiteside offers #SC71 #SC76 #SC41 #SC39.

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Rich

5001 posts in 1099 days


#3 posted 09-17-2019 12:06 AM

+1 for the scratch stock. Hock makes a nice one and it’s available at Woodcraft if you have one in your area, otherwise order online from hocktools.com. BTW, the tool comes with a pre-made blade in addition to the blanks for making your own. The pre-made one isn’t too far off from what you pictured.

-- There are 10 types of people—those who understand binary, and those who don’t

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

850 posts in 1612 days


#4 posted 09-17-2019 12:11 AM

I was thinking what LeeRoyMan said. However, another way also comes to mind. You could cut the bottom profile of your apron on a band saw minus the strip below the groove. Round over the edge and then cut the 1/2” strip to fit, round over the edge and glue it on.

You could also do it with a router and grooving bit but, you would need a very accurately made template and a top bearing guide on the router bit or a guide bushing like what is typically use with a dovetailing jig.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12907 posts in 2890 days


#5 posted 09-17-2019 07:21 AM

Original was maybe done with a pin router but a scratch stock would be more practical for a one off.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

1171 posts in 2459 days


#6 posted 09-17-2019 07:59 AM

I’m in for the scratch stock.

-- Petey

View SMP's profile

SMP

1392 posts in 415 days


#7 posted 09-17-2019 11:36 AM

I think his question though is how is the scratch stock going to get around that tight curve? Unless a different design like the veritas model or the Lie Nielsen beading tool style?

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GrantA

1818 posts in 1917 days


#8 posted 09-17-2019 01:01 PM

scratch stock for sure, an old piece of saw blade or card scraper and a scrap of wood will do the trick. cut a kerf in the end and round over the wood so it can follow the profile. You can see in the one Rich posted above the blade can be moved to the end. That’s the idea.

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Rich

5001 posts in 1099 days


#9 posted 09-17-2019 01:44 PM


I think his question though is how is the scratch stock going to get around that tight curve? Unless a different design like the veritas model or the Lie Nielsen beading tool style?

- SMP

As GrantA pointed out, the Hock scratch stock is designed so that the blade can be mounted either on the side, as pictured, or out the front, where it can be used inside curves.

It only costs $32. Pretty much a no-brainer in my book.

-- There are 10 types of people—those who understand binary, and those who don’t

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knotscott

8334 posts in 3885 days


#10 posted 09-17-2019 04:59 PM

Thanks for the ideas guys. You’re all pretty much confirming that there’s not an easy trick for doing this. We’ll figure out something…leaning towards the scratch stock at the moment. Will let you know how it ends up. Thx!

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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GrantA

1818 posts in 1917 days


#11 posted 09-17-2019 05:21 PM

The scratch stock is a deceptively easy way to do it. Inexpensive to buy or potentially free to make if you have a scrap saw blade around. I’ve got a warped handsaw blade that works perfect for such a thing

View DS's profile

DS

3301 posts in 2930 days


#12 posted 09-17-2019 05:25 PM

Router with a collar, v-groove or point-cove bit and a template.

Unless you have a CNC Router, then, write the code, press start.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8334 posts in 3885 days


#13 posted 09-17-2019 08:46 PM

I think I might have a solution. After playing around with all my router pieces parts for a while, I took my Milwaukee edge guide, turned it upside down and backwards, removed the thread adjust knob, and added a bolt through the adjuster hole and a crown nut to act as the guide. The test run went pretty well. I have four pieces of apron to do that will cover around 160 linear inches with 8 arcs. Hopefully the real thing goes as well as the test.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

10737 posts in 4562 days


#14 posted 09-17-2019 09:41 PM

Scott,

I think I would do what you came up with… EXCEPT, I would use a GUIDE around the bit… s large as it takes to get the proper distance from edge… In a Router Table… <=====

Then, merely route all edges required… changing depth per Pass until done.

Would be much easier to control around the curves… Hope I’m not too late.

Looks like it’s going to be a COOL table!

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: https://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/index.php

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knotscott

8334 posts in 3885 days


#15 posted 09-17-2019 09:56 PM

Too late Joe! I tried the collar guide around the bit earlier, but it prevents the bit from reaching the wood….I need the far edge of the guide to contact the wood. The collar method would have need a template….which is a good approach too, but I was concerned about getting the template just right.

My adapted jig worked, but it was a bit difficult to navigate the curves….I did mess up one of them a little, and going to need to fix it, but otherwise it worked out pretty well….not perfect, but pretty well. These will all get cleaned up and painted.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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