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breaking down large sheet goods

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Forum topic by rj055 posted 09-14-2019 02:28 PM 562 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rj055

1 post in 882 days


09-14-2019 02:28 PM

Topic tags/keywords: shop jigs breaking down sheet goods cutting plywood festool parallel guides square cuts accurate cuts festool parallel guides jig

I’ve been using this method to break down full plywood sheets for the last few months and would like to get some ideas on how it might be made better. So far it seems to be the cheapest and most accurate method that I’ve tried. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3R7vIWm5FLs&t=66s


12 replies so far

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wildwoodbybrianjohns

305 posts in 57 days


#1 posted 09-14-2019 03:27 PM

Fastest method I know of is to have them cut it up at the lumberyard when you buy it, at least to rough dimensions. Costs a tad extra sometimes, but way faster than your link. And you dont have to lug around full sheets.

-- Wildwood by Brian Johns: It is wiser to find out, than to suppose (S. Clemens)

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Andre

2794 posts in 2316 days


#2 posted 09-14-2019 03:43 PM

Maybe, but 37 min. ? I find my Dewalt track saw is much quicker and close enough.

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

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Andybb

2102 posts in 1113 days


#3 posted 09-14-2019 04:19 PM


Fastest method I know of is to have them cut it up at the lumberyard when you buy it, at least to rough dimensions. Costs a tad extra sometimes, but way faster than your link. And you dont have to lug around full sheets.

- wildwoodbybrianjohns


+1 If I know what I’m gonna use it for I’ll get them cut into rough dimensions wherever I buy them otherwise I just get them cut into one 4×4 and two 2×4 pieces. Santa’s helpers have grown and gone so it’s easier than slinging 4×8’s around the garage by myself.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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Jack Lewis

491 posts in 1588 days


#4 posted 09-14-2019 05:58 PM


Fastest method I know of is to have them cut it up at the lumberyard when you buy it, at least to rough dimensions. Costs a tad extra sometimes, but way faster than your link. And you dont have to lug around full sheets.

- wildwoodbybrianjohns

+1 If I know what I m gonna use it for I ll get them cut into rough dimensions wherever I buy them otherwise I just get them cut into one 4×4 and two 2×4 pieces. Santa s helpers have grown and gone so it s easier than slinging 4×8 s around the garage by myself.

- Andybb


My little Taurus, I can only get a sheet cut into three 32” pieces. Every thing I make has to fall within that dimension! Problem solved.

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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Andybb

2102 posts in 1113 days


#5 posted 09-14-2019 06:12 PM



I ve been using this method to break down full plywood sheets for the last few months and would like to get some ideas on how it might be made better.
- rj055

Don’t get me wrong. Nothing wrong with your method. For me it just falls into that category of really good ideas that in the end take more time to set up and tare down than it’s worth for me. I guess if I were to make a set of kitchen cabinets then setting this up during the build would be a time saver.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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therealSteveN

3886 posts in 1084 days


#6 posted 09-14-2019 08:30 PM

Truth be told that guys droning voice put me out scarcely a minute in. If this is the OP apologies, but this is my thought. I wonder because you have been using this for several months, and the YouTube is dated 9/9/19?

For figuring if a larger area (sheet of plywood) is square this would be an ok tool. All one really needs is 3, 4, 5, method of measuring a corner. If after knowing a particular corner of a sheet of plywood was in fact square, you could cut it out so you need not have to use a tape measure to do the same, but that simply comes down to allocation of your time, and expense in material cost.

I would much rather make a series of plywood cutting shoes in different lengths, and make them double sided, one for a circ saw, and the other for a router. If you don’t have a track saw, that is the quickest way to cut down sheet goods I have come across since the 60’s when it was first available to me on a regular basis. I do own a track saw, and still regularly use a shoe for the router side when I make cabinets for cutting in shelf dados.

No one is wrong, because for every aspect of woodworking there are often several ways to do it. What you need to do is have done it, and pretty much from there you can look at other ways of doing the same, and if it looks like it might work better head that way. Or not.

The guy at Home Depot a long time ago said they just need to be within 1/4” is that still the standard? I can free hand tighter than that. Chalk line anyone???

-- Think safe, be safe

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waho6o9

8770 posts in 3086 days


#7 posted 09-14-2019 10:01 PM

I dimension sheet goods off the truck by burning the factory width and length wide enough for
back rails and shelf supports. Then dimension the partitions etc from a cut sheet.

After everything’s dimensioned I start assembling on the same work bench which is a WalkoIV on a
pair of Stanely saw horses. Track saws make work enjoyable YMMV. This works well for me.

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hairy

2928 posts in 4042 days


#8 posted 09-14-2019 11:56 PM

I use this to rough cut, finish cut on table saw. Foam insulation sheet on saw horses, plywood on insulation, and I clamp everything together in 2 corners away from the cut. Works for me.

https://www.kregtool.com/store/c48/saw-attachments/p424/rip-cuttrade/

-- Genghis Khan and his brother Don, couldn't keep on keeping on...

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Toller

43 posts in 2110 days


#9 posted 09-15-2019 02:15 AM

I didn’t actually watch the video; just thought how nice it would be to have a table that big to work on.

I get it rough cut before I bring it home.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3886 posts in 1084 days


#10 posted 09-15-2019 02:55 AM



I dimension sheet goods off the truck by burning the factory width and length wide enough for
back rails and shelf supports. Then dimension the partitions etc from a cut sheet.

After everything s dimensioned I start assembling on the same work bench which is a WalkoIV on a
pair of Stanely saw horses. Track saws make work enjoyable YMMV. This works well for me.

- waho6o9

That looks like a kick butt roll your own MFT. Yeah a big cutting area, and a track saw take the lead, just $$$$$$ I have a centipede. It is pretty awesome. I bought the darn thing when I was still doing trade work. Hardly used it before I had an invitation to get my heart reworked, not much trade work after that. :-(

I roll my own MFT’s, can’t keep one around long, they keep getting bought from under me. I use 3/4” holes, and 80/20 metal extrusions usually. So many more people selling 3/4” stuff than Festool’s weird dimension.

I didn’t have any luck with Google on searching “WalkoIV” did you spell it correctly?

-- Think safe, be safe

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waho6o9

8770 posts in 3086 days


#11 posted 09-15-2019 03:57 AM

Walko’s aren’t sold anymore for whatever reason, but it’s a nice addition to my shop.

https://www.walko.nl/en-uk/

I guess they’re in a transition phase. Best of luck Walko!

Dear visitor,

At this moment we are working on the repositioning and the sale of WALKO-Tools B.V.
During this transition our stock-products are limited or not available. This is mentioned per article on this website.
If interested, for more information or for leads please contact us per email.

Brand- or private label available on order (under MOQ).

With kind regards,
Team WALKO

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Axis39

51 posts in 107 days


#12 posted 09-15-2019 09:51 PM

I didn’t get very far through the video. To me, it seems like over-complication.

I currently throw sheet goods on top of my Jeep Cherokee. When I get home, I pull out a pair of saw horses and a couple fo 2×4’s. I grab my circular saw, and clamping edge guide, and go to town. I know the offset of my circular saw, but a lot of the time, I simply use a gauge I have set up to measure cuts on either side of the blade.

I have built simple track cutting guides as well… A straight edge down the middle of a sheet of thin flat stock, and run the saw down either side to get the right spacing. Set the guid on the cut line and Bob’s your uncle.

The gigantic triangle looks cumbersome, especially if you only need a skinny piece off the end of a sheet.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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