LumberJocks

Wall mounted dog/cat door to outside

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by Holbs posted 09-11-2019 01:57 AM 231 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2228 posts in 2510 days


09-11-2019 01:57 AM

Topic tags/keywords: pet door

Seeing how it’s near Mid-September, there is something I would like to accomplish before the snow comes a knocking (along with my home security system, camera, home automation current project).
I have 3 adult cats and a Pomeranian dog. Looking at Pet Safe and other various name brand wall mounted pet entry doors, I am not very impressed. Cheap plastic, cheap vinyl flaps, over indulging price tags. The one I really liked that was well made and high quality came in around a house payment so that’s a no go.
Since I am a aspiring in-the-works woodworker, the thought came to me that I should do this as a wood working project. Let me see what others have done for inspiration here on LJ’s. Sadly, only found one such project with not much to go on https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/273450 (which I may follow for outside facade).
So my question would be… species selection. Since this is outdoor entry to the inside, teak or redwood would be ideal (never worked on either)?
Some points to consider:
1.) I do live in Reno, NV with some would consider Lake Tahoe lite with the weather comparison (snow, rain, wind, hot days).
2.) Will be going through kitchen wall besides patio sliding glass door. Will not be going through a door itself.
3.) My main concern is doing a quality job with keeping mold, mildew, rain, snow from screwing up the wall penetration.
4.) Second concern is security. I really need to secure this thing when no one is home.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"


9 replies so far

View Ripper70's profile

Ripper70

1314 posts in 1389 days


#1 posted 09-11-2019 02:46 AM

This solution seems to incorporate much of what you’re looking for. It’s above my pay grade but might be right in your wheelhouse.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2228 posts in 2510 days


#2 posted 09-11-2019 02:48 AM

no RFID auto-door mechanisms for me :) Gotta think about if I sell this house and the next owners are not techie’s

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View HerringImpaired's profile

HerringImpaired

19 posts in 190 days


#3 posted 09-11-2019 04:32 PM

I built a frame for our dog door so I could install/remove it as needed in our sliding glass door for the patio. The solution for securing the door was a simple door stop that is sized to stop the sliding door with or without the dog door installed by how it is oriented. Commercial sliding door panels with dog/cat doors installed are available, but at the time, none would fit my vinyl sliding door properly. Security while away was important to me, and I wasn’t excited about cutting a hole in the wall. I used cedar for the pet door frame, but I have a covered patio so weather is not an issue in my case. If you look closely, you can see the accumulation of dirt brought on by 3 Cattle Dogs using the door several times a day. :-)

-- "My greatest fear is that upon my demise, my wife will sell my tools for what I said I paid for them."

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2228 posts in 2510 days


#4 posted 09-11-2019 04:45 PM

I already have an existing patio door insert I bought off Craigslist for $20: single pane/single flap. Pain in the butt to enter/exit the patio door to hang clothes on clothesline or walk in/out in general (gotta turn sideways sometimes). And not at all energy efficient. Not at all secure. Besides, one of my future projects will be to remove the patio sliding glass door & frame and do french doors or such.
I do like your DIY look though. Probably more robust than the cheap basic insert I use.

Looks like I’ll be heading down the cedar species route for the indoor/outdoor trim facade and hallway. And building mini-dog house on the outside to somewhat hide the outside door itself and to keep the elements away from the flaps.

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2228 posts in 2510 days


#5 posted 09-11-2019 05:30 PM

ok…best looking wall mounted pet entry door I could find for DIY which I’ll do my best at replicating and keeping a project blog here on LJ’s:

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

View Mr_Pink's profile

Mr_Pink

173 posts in 852 days


#6 posted 09-11-2019 05:36 PM



Gotta think about if I sell this house and the next owners are not techie s

The RFID isn’t going to affect your ability to sell the house. Putting a doggy door through the wall is.

View HerringImpaired's profile

HerringImpaired

19 posts in 190 days


#7 posted 09-11-2019 08:52 PM

Holbs, I saw that door you have pictured and like it a lot. If I was to go through a wall, that would be the way to do it.
I’d probably just use a deadbolt, and try and find some hinges that would tend to keep the door open once unlocked. It looks like once it is closed, it would be weathertight…..

-- "My greatest fear is that upon my demise, my wife will sell my tools for what I said I paid for them."

View clin's profile

clin

1057 posts in 1477 days


#8 posted 09-11-2019 10:13 PM

There’s a reason the off-the-shelf pet doors are made of vinyl or aluminum. They hold up very well to weather for years. You certainly can make your own from wood, but expect a lot more maintenance to keep it looking good. It’s trivial to caulk a pet door and ensure no water leaks in around it.

Obviously, if the exterior is very exposed and you have wind-driven rain, you might get some water past the flap(s). Many of these doors have two flaps. The flaps are commonly magnetic and seal pretty well. And if you make your own, you’ll still do some sort of flaps anyway.

As for security, if it’s a cat size pet door, you have no problem. Even if a thief tried to send a small child through to unlock your house door. A child big enough to walk, let alone unlock a door isn’t fitting through a cat door. But, if you need one bigger, there is no real security other than having an additional, strong door you can seal it with. But, then you lose the ability for the pet to come and go at all times. This need varies with different people and their pets.

I think the RFID tags are more about controlling which pets can come and go, and keeping wildlife out, than they are about securing the door against burglary. Though maybe there are some doors with true physical security (can’t be easily kicked in), that can be unlocked this way. “Here kitty, kitty, kitty, help me unlock your door.”

Keep in mind, just about every house can be easily broken into by simply breaking a pane of glass. So there’s little reason to make a pet door excessively sturdy.

-- Clin

View Holbs's profile

Holbs

2228 posts in 2510 days


#9 posted 09-11-2019 11:01 PM

Clin…
the reason why vinyl is popular is due to the economics. Which I understand as many can not justify $300-$400 for aluminum (I certainly could not). If I were not into the woodworking game, I would certainly go for the vinyl.

For the flaps, I’m thinking of creating hinged flaps instead of vertical flaps that bend in/out. Many folks complain about vertical affixed flaps tearing, wearing out, bowing (especially in cold weather). Hinged flaps (yes…will go with dual hinged flaps) alleviate those concerns a strong degree.

Currently, not concerned about security now that I have a path to follow like the picture above. A mini-me door, complete with a lockable door handle/dead bolt (I do have a spare Schlage setup to use for something like this). Will be open 98% of the time unless out of the house for a long period of time where things need to be secured more than a thin piece of plastic. I will also have a robust home security setup with pet friendly motion detectors, remote view able IP cameras and who knows what else (glass break detectors as well).

-- The Carpenter Bee is derived from the Ancient Greek word wood-cutter "xylokopos/ξυλοκὀπος"

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com