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What is this jig???

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Forum topic by SoCalBonnie posted 09-11-2019 12:05 AM 716 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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SoCalBonnie

32 posts in 190 days


09-11-2019 12:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jig

I got this at an estate sale for $5 because the clamps are worth way more than that.

Before I take it apart I would like to know what it is used for. Maybe I can use it! I’ve searched photos of jigs and haven’t found one that looks like it, except for a cross-cut thingy, which sort of looks like this jig but not really.

What do you think it is? Here is the front:

... here is the side…

...and here is the back…

And should I keep it? Or cannibalize it as originally intended????


16 replies so far

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3877 posts in 1868 days


#1 posted 09-11-2019 12:16 AM

My guess would be a dado jig for a router?

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

691 posts in 1121 days


#2 posted 09-11-2019 12:27 AM

That, or a crosscut/guide jig for a circular saw.
If you have a router or circular saw you could check fit.
Then, cannibalize!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

15 posts in 78 days


#3 posted 09-11-2019 12:33 AM

Could be a planer/jointer/flattening jig for a router as well.

But, I think Lazyman nailed it with a dado jig. Just clamp the workpiece in place, and run the router up the rails.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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Rich

4823 posts in 1070 days


#4 posted 09-11-2019 12:40 AM

If it was any sort of crosscut jig or dado jig, I’d expect to see marks from the cutting in the fence. Either a kerf from a saw or a wider cut from a router bit. Also what’s the purpose of the groove in the fence? Is it just because they used some scrap wood that had a groove in it, or did some sort of guide ride in it?

You definitely got more than $5 worth of reusable parts with the toggle clamps and even the angle pieces.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23601 posts in 3164 days


#5 posted 09-11-2019 12:47 AM

Fancy version of what I would use to cut vinyl siding with….clamps to keep things from moving, while the circular saw did it’s thing.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3877 posts in 1868 days


#6 posted 09-11-2019 12:49 AM

I had the same thoughts about the missing kerf or cutout from the router bit so they either never used it or had another way of stopping the cut. The width of the aluminum looks too far apart for most router bases to me as well.

My first thought was actually a flattening jig but it is made wrong for that. First, it could only be used on boards no thicker than the fences and you would have to move the piece you are flattening instead of the carriage which would not yield a flat top unless the bottom was already perfectly flat.

You may just have to ask Jack since his name is written on it. :-)

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View pottz's profile

pottz

5978 posts in 1465 days


#7 posted 09-11-2019 01:57 PM

id just cannibalize and save what you need.a great score for 5 bucks id say.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View DS's profile

DS

3268 posts in 2901 days


#8 posted 09-11-2019 02:08 PM

“It’s like the square root of a million—we may never know.” – Nelson Muntz

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10750 posts in 1619 days


#9 posted 09-11-2019 05:11 PM



“It s like the square root of a million—we may never know.” – Nelson Muntz

- DS


BAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5661 posts in 3724 days


#10 posted 09-11-2019 06:04 PM

Those rails look too far apart for a router. Looks more like a sled for a circular saw, but with the lack of kerf cuts on the cross piece ????

View SoCalBonnie's profile

SoCalBonnie

32 posts in 190 days


#11 posted 09-11-2019 06:16 PM


You may just have to ask Jack since his name is written on it. :-)

- Lazyman

Also what’s the purpose of the groove in the fence? Is it just because they used some scrap wood that had a groove in it, or did some sort of guide ride in it?

- Rich

Unfortunately, I think Jack was the relative who was supposed to get the jig but who didn’t want it! The people running the estate sale had no idea what it was and it doesn’t fit my circular saw. I’m not sure what the groove is, either… I thought he just used scrap wood to make the jig, but that’s odd because because the rest of the jig is all very nice quality wood.

View MPython's profile

MPython

163 posts in 293 days


#12 posted 09-11-2019 10:08 PM

My guess is a dado jig for a router. The router probably had a purpose-made base, perhaps with UHMW to make it slide easy. I built a similar one for my own use. It works great. Before I chucked it I’d look into building a new router base to fit it. You may find you like it. It looks like a pretty well built jig.

View Knockonit's profile

Knockonit

603 posts in 683 days


#13 posted 09-11-2019 10:38 PM

poor or cheap mans chop saw, hehe, square guide to cut wide material, probably wide shelving jig or siding jig

View Andybb's profile (online now)

Andybb

2029 posts in 1084 days


#14 posted 09-13-2019 02:04 AM

Probably a one off for a specific project? Keep the clamps and rails and square off the wood and put it in the bin for some future and as yet unknown project.

One of the rare times you can earn the “you suck” tag for something that nobody even knows what it is. :-)

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

707 posts in 391 days


#15 posted 09-13-2019 07:43 AM

Looks like you have it upside down, turn it around, then lean it against the wall. It looks like a panel saw for MDF sheets or plywood sheets. lay in a backer board (waste board) between the back and the sheet your cutting. A circular saw is mounted onto a board the slides up and down the to cut the sheet goods. The clamps are to hold the sheets in place once you mark and ready to cut the sheets.

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