LumberJocks

30-Minute Bandsaw Rehab with Alex Snodgrass

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by therealSteveN posted 09-09-2019 09:15 PM 935 views 2 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3914 posts in 1087 days


09-09-2019 09:15 PM

Hi All

This is a video Chuck Bender released today with Alex, on doing a rehab with a Delta BS, though it could easily apply to the clones as well.

It is something of a sales presentation for Carter products, which I have no affiliation with, though I have most everything he uses here on a lowly HF 14” clone, and can, and do get the same results as Alex gets. Plus you will see Alex straight up, talk about the “drift” myth.

A person need NOT buy all of these Carter parts, but if you’ve got either a used 14” Delta, or clone BS used, or never went through the steps Alex does here I’d suggest them. Take your time, and get all the capability your saw is capable of giving you.

Enjoy. It is 38:56 long, so some here will NOT think it’s a good video based on????

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYYG91fr_2w&feature=youtu.be&utm=

-- Think safe, be safe


19 replies so far

View GaryCK's profile

GaryCK

55 posts in 562 days


#1 posted 09-10-2019 01:57 AM

I’ve seen Alex do his rehab in person once. He offers many solid and useful tips. I’ve not watched the video yet, but saved it so I could do so later. I expect it will be as worth the time as his in-person workshop. Thank you for posting it.

-- Gary, Wisconsin

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3914 posts in 1087 days


#2 posted 09-10-2019 08:11 AM

It is pretty much the clinic he puts on if you catch him at a show. Chuck may have gotten a better camera angle on the finer points than what you can usually see jostling around at a show.

-- Think safe, be safe

View JohnDi's profile

JohnDi

79 posts in 1946 days


#3 posted 09-10-2019 10:02 AM

II was fortunate enough to take a class at Chuck,s last month and actually got a chance to use the saw in the video.
Chuck mentioned that he and Alex had filmed a video the week before.
The saw does an excellent job resawing wider boards. I don’t own any Carter products but I am considering the guides based on my experience with his saw.
His saw does have a riser block installed which my Delta clone does not so I wouldn’t have as much capacity but they are definitely worth considering.

View Robert's profile

Robert

3539 posts in 1993 days


#4 posted 09-10-2019 02:16 PM

If you’re talking about eliminating drift, it doesn’t work on every brand of band saw. But I would say go ahead and fiddle round maybe it will work for you.

I can adjust the fence to the drift in 1 minute so that’s what I been doing for 35 yrs.

I found the best way is to adjust the table for the drift. You do this by setting the fence at 90 to the rail, loosen the table bolts and make a test cut. Michael Fortune has a good video on this.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23803 posts in 3196 days


#5 posted 09-10-2019 05:22 PM

Figures…I spent a while last winter…rehabbing my bandsaw ( needed a new lower wheel shaft, and I replaced the motor)....NOW you post the how to video…...

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3914 posts in 1087 days


#6 posted 09-10-2019 05:35 PM


I don t own any Carter products but I am considering the guides based on my experience with his saw.
His saw does have a riser block installed which my Delta clone does not so I wouldn t have as much capacity but they are definitely worth considering.

- JohnDi

The stock Carter guides can bring an older, maybe outdated design into the here and now. They are much better engineered, than what they had on the Delta’s way back when.

If you do more fine, and tight radius curve cutting I would suggest the Carter Bandsaw stabilizer It’s a single point guide, that essentially just sits behind the blade above the table, and steers the smooth hard spine of the blade. It’s like turning your saw into a Formula One racer.

I have the guides on my HF saw, but can swap out the top for the Stabilizer. using 1/4” or smaller blades it can’t be matched by guides pressing down on both sides of the blade.

I finally realized that to get everything you could out of a bandsaw, without spending half your life swapping blades, and setting up a saw to behave, it made more sense for me to have 2 Bandsaw’s. One for curves, and one for resaw. Best duplicate tool I could think of. Well maybe a herd of router tables???

-- Think safe, be safe

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3914 posts in 1087 days


#7 posted 09-10-2019 05:48 PM



Figures…I spent a while last winter…rehabbing my bandsaw ( needed a new lower wheel shaft, and I replaced the motor)....NOW you post the how to video…...

- bandit571

Chuck just released it yesterday :-)

Wouldn’t have helped much with the wheel shaft though. Of course tearing into it probably hi-lighted the fact the shaft wasn’t doing it’s job. If it’s all together we seem to try to fix everything from the top side. That shaft is power transfer though. So any problem can be trouble. Was it broken, worn, or just all about lower bearings?

-- Think safe, be safe

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3914 posts in 1087 days


#8 posted 09-10-2019 06:55 PM

Michael Fortune has a good video on this.

- Robert

Interesting that you mention Michael. It was in 2011 in a class at WIA, that he told us drift was a myth. Up until then I never knew it was just misalignment of your bandsaw, and I believed as you do you just needed to deal with it. I have only owned 3 BS’s since then. The old Delta got traded off when I won the new HF, with all the trimmings. I have had all 3 as a drift free saw since then. I believe proper adjustment will make any BS drift free. I too have seen the video where he walks you around actually fixing the problem. Alex won’t do that, and if you ever meet him, he’ll tell you drift is a myth. I haven’t seen Fortune since the WIA class, but it’s in my head to ask him about that video.

Michael also gave all of us another tip. Get your blades made at BC Saw. I also did that, until they were bought out by some outfit named Nap Gladu, and since then at first couldn’t make a blade worth a hoot, and now I believe they stopped making BS blades up all-together. Those BC Saw blades were awesome. Either Starrett or Lennox material, welded to perfection. They had one guy welding for something like 30 years. Generally at a saw shop BS blade welder is the bottom tier job, and guys only do it, until they quit, or transfer to somewhere else. That is why I am picky about where I get my BS blades.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3983 posts in 1900 days


#9 posted 09-10-2019 09:18 PM

The best tip in the whole thing is at about 30 minutes in, which I think I’ve seen in another Snodgrass video but had forgotten, for a quick way to make sure that the table is square without using a square.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23803 posts in 3196 days


#10 posted 09-10-2019 09:43 PM


Figures…I spent a while last winter…rehabbing my bandsaw ( needed a new lower wheel shaft, and I replaced the motor)....NOW you post the how to video…...

- bandit571

Chuck just released it yesterday :-)

Wouldn t have helped much with the wheel shaft though. Of course tearing into it probably hi-lighted the fact the shaft wasn t doing it s job. If it s all together we seem to try to fix everything from the top side. That shaft is power transfer though. So any problem can be trouble. Was it broken, worn, or just all about lower bearings?

- therealSteveN

Bearings were fine…shaft was “wallered out” and ate up between the bearings….wheel had a lot of wobble, and tended to either stall, or toss the blade. “New” motor has “oilers” on the shaft. Can barely here it run….very quiet…for a $3 garage sale find…hjad to replace a key, as one on the drive pulley on the wheel was MIA….new key, and a new pulley and key for the motor…

saw has “cool blocks”....I can’t seem to adjust them tight to the blade…stalls the saw.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#11 posted 09-10-2019 09:47 PM


aw has “cool blocks”....I can t seem to adjust them tight to the blade…stalls the saw.

- bandit571

Use a feeler gauge.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2112 posts in 1116 days


#12 posted 09-14-2019 10:54 PM


aw has “cool blocks”....I can t seem to adjust them tight to the blade…stalls the saw.

- bandit571

Use a feeler gauge.

- Rich


A dollar bill seems to work well for me. YMMV.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3914 posts in 1087 days


#13 posted 09-15-2019 07:40 AM

2 of them with cool blocks, they get fussy if you crowd them, but on metal, yeah a dollar. In my case a dollar or 2 are usually much more convenient than a feeler gauge.

-- Think safe, be safe

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23803 posts in 3196 days


#14 posted 09-15-2019 01:27 PM

My problem has been the Bosch blades I am using…..they have way too much set. I may wind up turning the blocks around…..maybe a fresh “edge” will help.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View Rich's profile

Rich

5001 posts in 1102 days


#15 posted 09-15-2019 01:55 PM

Feeler gauges are very convenient if you’re creative. A dollar bill is OK in a pinch, but come on. Are we talking crisp new ones or worn ones? I’ll stick with the real thing, and mine are always there when I need them.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com