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Making a staked high stool

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Forum topic by trsnider posted 09-06-2019 01:14 PM 371 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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trsnider

148 posts in 2490 days


09-06-2019 01:14 PM

Topic tags/keywords: staked high stool stretchers drilling

I’m trying to learn/polish my hand tool skills and get frustrated. This time it’s with trying to make the staked high stool (https://blog.lostartpress.com/2017/04/11/download-plans-for-the-staked-high-stool/) from Christopher Schwarz. I’m using the “crappiest 2×12 construction lumber” that big blue had. My question is how to stop the pine from shattering/ blowing out on the back side when drilling the stretcher holes in the legs. I’ve tried:
1. Holding a scrap piece to the back side doesn’t work unless you have three hands (holding the leg. drill. and the scrap wood) when you’re drilling the hole with the leg in the stool.
2. Coming in from the backside. That might work if I could get a consistent angle with the hole which I can’t.
The bit should be sharp—it’s brand new.
Think I’ll try taking the leg out and drill through the outside with the leg out of the stool. Any other ideas.

This stool looks so simple—- but…. I get frustrated when things look so easy printed but I can’t seem to do them worth a damn. Of course Mr. Schwarz has some skill and he’s doing this much more than I do.
(yes I do feel better now :) ) Any other ideas?

On the positive side making the tapered octagon legs is easy, (relatively) fast, and safe using hand planes. Making jigs for the band/table saw didn’t seem worth the effort. Using powered tools for this didn’t seem real safe.


12 replies so far

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bondogaposis

5518 posts in 2832 days


#1 posted 09-06-2019 02:33 PM

What kind of bit are you using?

-- Bondo Gaposis

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trsnider

148 posts in 2490 days


#2 posted 09-06-2019 02:39 PM

I’m using a long spade bit as suggested to get a parallel hole with the seat/other leg hole

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5518 posts in 2832 days


#3 posted 09-06-2019 03:15 PM

Here is a couple of ideas to try. One, drill until the very tip of the drill point pokes through on the back side, stop and pull out the bit and come at it from the opposite side. Two, make a custom backer block that fits the leg and then clamp it to the leg before drilling. Three, drill a pilot hole with a 1/8” bit all the way through, then come at from both sides with the spade bit.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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pottz

5978 posts in 1465 days


#4 posted 09-06-2019 03:35 PM



Here is a couple of ideas to try. One, drill until the very tip of the drill point pokes through on the back side, stop and pull out the bit and come at it from the opposite side. Two, make a custom backer block that fits the leg and then clamp it to the leg before drilling. Three, drill a pilot hole with a 1/8” bit all the way through, then come at from both sides with the spade bit.

- bondogaposis


+1 i usually drill until the tip pokes through and then go back through the other side and never have an issue that way.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

821 posts in 1583 days


#5 posted 09-06-2019 06:12 PM

Why do you need to drill the socket holes all the way through? The project photos don’t show it that way.

View Axis39's profile

Axis39

15 posts in 78 days


#6 posted 09-07-2019 02:48 AM

The first pictures on the link shows thew top of the black stools and the legs come through.

EDIT Sorry, hit Post too fast…

I like Forstner bits better than spade bits. But with the idea of staying parallel with the legs, I see how the long shaft of the spade bit would help.

I like the suggestion of using a 1/8” bit and drilling all the way through, then attacking from both sides. It’s the way I would do it.

One requirement for drilling through from one direction is to clamp a backer to the workpiece. Just holding it won’t do.

Let us know how it goes.

-- John F. SoCal transplant, chewer uppper of good wood

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bilyo

821 posts in 1583 days


#7 posted 09-07-2019 02:56 PM

The OP said, “My question is how to stop the pine from shattering/ blowing out on the back side when drilling the stretcher holes in the legs.”
That is the basis of my question.
I agree that a forstner bit would be better. Even if the hole does go all the way through, the rim of the forstner cuts ahead of the cutters and will go through more smoothly with less chance of blow-out. Making the final cut from the back side is still better, however.

View Pat3's profile

Pat3

116 posts in 2360 days


#8 posted 09-08-2019 07:45 AM

The directions tell you to use a spade bit and when the tip of the bit just pokes thru the backside, then stop. Remove the bit from the front of the hole, insert a dowel into the hole, to protect it, then start drilling into the small hole on the backside of the leg. This will prevent the blowout you are experiencing. I made one using scrap wood, fun project.

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Mr_Pink

173 posts in 852 days


#9 posted 09-08-2019 07:52 PM


The directions tell you to use a spade bit and when the tip of the bit just pokes thru the backside, then stop. Remove the bit from the front of the hole, insert a dowel into the hole, to protect it, then start drilling into the small hole on the backside of the leg. This will prevent the blowout you are experiencing. I made one using scrap wood, fun project.

This is also how he teaches you to do it in the class, and I don’t remember anyone having a problem with it.

An advantage of torching the wood as part of the finishing process, if you choose that option, is that minor defects are hidden/burned away. I don’t know how bad the blow-out in question is, but you can definitely skip the usual “make pretty” steps if you’re finishing with fire.

View trsnider's profile

trsnider

148 posts in 2490 days


#10 posted 09-09-2019 12:26 PM

Thanks. Going r e a l sloooooooooow and using a plug helped. The lumber I bought splinters real easy.
Now if I only had a lathe to turn the tenons. sigh oh well.

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Pat3

116 posts in 2360 days


#11 posted 09-11-2019 04:45 AM

So when are we going to see some pics of the stool?
Hopefully the tenons weren’t too much trouble.
I don’t have a lathe either so it does take some time to get them done.
Good luck!

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trsnider

148 posts in 2490 days


#12 posted 09-11-2019 04:31 PM

I’ll post pics when done. Outside project got in the way. SO has wanted a fire pit and a path for many years. Friend had flagstone sitting idle for years. He said come and get it or its going to the landfill. So now we have the famous ‘path to nowhere’ waiting the firepit itself.

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