LumberJocks

Making profile chisels out of molding blades

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodturning forum

Forum topic by d_sinsley posted 09-05-2019 02:18 PM 569 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View d_sinsley's profile

d_sinsley

105 posts in 63 days


09-05-2019 02:18 PM

Has anyone tried making turning chisels for doing profiles out of the cutters that go into those molding heads that fit on circular saws. I have one of those with several profiles and will eventual add to the collection. I also got my Christmas list in the mail (grizzly catalog) and it has a rosette cutter head with separate blades. It got me thinking why couldn’t I get some steel stock and drill and tap it for those blades put a handle on it and then use it for cutting profiles.

Good idea, bad idea, will I end up with one in my head?

-- Devon


10 replies so far

View PPK's profile

PPK

1525 posts in 1316 days


#1 posted 09-05-2019 05:27 PM

Interesting idea! Never tried such a thing. For repetitive work, it may be useful. Otherwise, I think the argument against it would be that you can make virtually anything with a basic 3-4 turning tools, without having to change “cutterheads” And depending on the size of the cutter head, I could see it trying to take too big a bite of the wood (too much surface area) and either catching or potentially loosening your blank in the headstock/tailstock.

-- Pete

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10890 posts in 1645 days


#2 posted 09-05-2019 05:39 PM

In general, those kinds of tools won’t work well on a lathe for the reasons that Pete points out. If you had a bunch of parts needing the same profile, you may be able to rough near the final shape and use the molding cutters to finish them.

That being said, the proof is in the pudding. Give it a go and let us know :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2739 posts in 2642 days


#3 posted 09-06-2019 09:52 AM

Are you talking about both cutter head & knives or just knives?
https://www.grizzly.com/products/Woodstock-Rosette-Cutterhead/W1250

Depends upon what you want to do! People used to use old planer blades to make scrapers for hollowing and other turning tools. Lot of people buy HSS M2 drill rod to make round skews. Flat M2 HSS, bars for making skews & scrapers too!

Here is an old article on making turning tools:
http://www.woodcentral.com/russ/russ10.shtml

Today with so many inexpensive turning tools out there why bother unless have some HSS steel laying around..

-- Bill

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1618 posts in 2237 days


#4 posted 09-06-2019 03:23 PM

And depending on the size of the cutter head, I could see it trying to take too big a bite of the wood (too much surface area) and either catching or potentially loosening your blank in the headstock/tailstock.

- PPK

I’ve made a couple. What Pete said above is very true, but you do not just put your tool straight into the wood. Bad things do happen trying to take off too much material with any tool. Start your cut from one side of the tool, and slowly and carefully rotate or rock the tool back and forth until you’ve reached the other side of the cut.

If you don’t mind being bored for nearly 10 minutes, below is a video I posted to YT on a Carbide bead cutter I had my sharpening service make for me. It is a copy of a steel cutter I made years ago that I finally decided needed to be made in carbide as I don’t need to sharpen it as often. It works for me. The best thing is I call that bead my trademark. The video shows the rocking action I use to make the beads. I also show a straight in cut, and you can hear chatter happening as I make my cut. I suppose you could call that a plunge cut. I would advise against it Pete mentioned above.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juGIlQYaGvw&list=UUNbQdo6Eey57sGg1jy04_zQ&index=37

Watch the video. It might help you in your quest, and and if you’re a glutton, subscribe to my channel…... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

2739 posts in 2642 days


#5 posted 09-06-2019 07:41 PM

Jerry in Tucson, while not a glutton and still chubby, didn’t subscribe to your channel did enjoy the video! Thanks for sharing!

-- Bill

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

8379 posts in 3305 days


#6 posted 09-07-2019 12:04 AM

It was a shaper cutter but yes. It worked well to make identical parts.

-- Paul M ..............the early bird may get the worm but it’s the second mouse that gets the cheese! http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View d_sinsley's profile

d_sinsley

105 posts in 63 days


#7 posted 09-07-2019 02:05 AM



It was a shaper cutter but yes. It worked well to make identical parts.

- shipwright


Yeah that’s what I am thinking. The cutters for those molding head cutters are about 1 inch wide. And just like this I think could work if taken very slow

-- Devon

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

3583 posts in 3616 days


#8 posted 09-07-2019 02:03 PM

We don’t have them generally (maybe no one does?), but if one were to use a cross feed like that on a metal lathe, maybe the chatter would be reduced? The ways would be sturdy, and the feed rate would be low enough.

-- Steven.......Random Orbital Nailer

View AndyJ1s's profile

AndyJ1s

62 posts in 262 days


#9 posted 09-08-2019 07:23 PM

Neither the steel nor the grind on a molding plane iron is likely to be optimal for turning, but that would likely only result in it dulling more quickly; otherwise it should work fine.

But this has got me thinking about a way to mount a carbide router bit (e.g beading bit, etc.) to a lathe tool handle, when I want multiple, identical small beads and/or coves.

Andy

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1885 posts in 2001 days


#10 posted 09-08-2019 11:32 PM

Tooling is tooling. Grind the right angles, and it should work.

Food for thought:
The challenge with large cutting edge on lathe becomes a horsepower problem.
Even in a production duplication lathe shop they don’t use large cutter tips. As the contact surface area gets larger you need more HP to keep lathe turning, and also need to stronger mounting system.

Not an expert, but worked with some large spindle making shops in Philippines. Largest profile I have seen in production wood shop was ~1.5” wide beading profile used on 4” OD posts, using a massive 5HP 3PH metal working lathe.
Good analogy might be to compare height and depth of router bits .vs. recommended router size, and why commercial shops use 5-7.5HP shapers on large profiles?

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com