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Is my Bosch 1617 Toast? Shaft Nut Loose!

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Forum topic by Castor Woodworks posted 09-05-2019 12:46 PM 695 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Castor Woodworks

86 posts in 353 days


09-05-2019 12:46 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router bosch 1617 shaft nut bosch router collect nut

Hey Guys,

I was cleaning up my router yesterday and noticed that the Shaft Nut was loose. It kind of freaked me out because that can’t be normal. The thought of anything loose on a machine that spins thing really fast scares me.

Has this happened to you guys?

This is the part i’m referring to:

-- Castor Woodworks, https://www.instagram.com/castor_woodworks


18 replies so far

View PPK's profile

PPK

1527 posts in 1322 days


#1 posted 09-05-2019 01:04 PM

I’d refer to the owner’s manual and check to see if there is a spec that shows a torque. If it was mine, I’d take the nut off, check the main bearing (possibly even replace it while you’ve got it apart) do a good cleaning, and then apply blue locktite (threadlocker) and re tighten the nut. I don’t think your router is toast. And good work for cleaning and checking your tools!

BTW, I’ve used these routers for quite a few years, and they are a really good router.

-- Pete

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2931 posts in 1735 days


#2 posted 09-05-2019 02:25 PM

If I recall correctly, that nut tightens against the inner bearing race so basically it needs to be tight since it traps this solid race between a lockring or machined step on the rotor shaft and itself.

Pete’s suggestion for the Locktite is what I’d go with.

View Monty151's profile

Monty151

83 posts in 354 days


#3 posted 09-05-2019 06:16 PM

Yeah loose nuts are no good. I like Pete suggested use Locktite on my nutz.

Hope it works out for you.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

5987 posts in 3326 days


#4 posted 09-05-2019 06:26 PM

At least you caught it in time. Most people wouldn’t realize it until it was stuck into the back wall of the shop at 16,500 RPM.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

232 posts in 510 days


#5 posted 09-05-2019 06:44 PM

If you need to replace anything the first stop is ereplacement parts.com. I had an internal bearing housing go postal in my favorite old Makita 1/4” router and found the part there. I hope all you have to do is follow PPK’s sage advice.
Good luck keeping your trusty tools intact.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View Castor Woodworks's profile

Castor Woodworks

86 posts in 353 days


#6 posted 09-05-2019 06:51 PM



I d refer to the owner s manual and check to see if there is a spec that shows a torque. If it was mine, I d take the nut off, check the main bearing (possibly even replace it while you ve got it apart) do a good cleaning, and then apply blue locktite (threadlocker) and re tighten the nut. I don t think your router is toast. And good work for cleaning and checking your tools!

BTW, I ve used these routers for quite a few years, and they are a really good router.

- PPK

Thank you for the info! I tried tightening it yesterday but my wrenches are too thick to get in on it. Need to find some thinner ones to finish the job.

-- Castor Woodworks, https://www.instagram.com/castor_woodworks

View Castor Woodworks's profile

Castor Woodworks

86 posts in 353 days


#7 posted 09-05-2019 06:51 PM



At least you caught it in time. Most people wouldn t realize it until it was stuck into the back wall of the shop at 16,500 RPM.

- pintodeluxe

Thats what feaks me out…

-- Castor Woodworks, https://www.instagram.com/castor_woodworks

View Castor Woodworks's profile

Castor Woodworks

86 posts in 353 days


#8 posted 09-18-2019 09:33 PM

Ok so I think I really goofed this time. I was trying to tighten the nut but the wrenches wouldn’t fit so I used some pliers to hold the shaft in place. As you can probably imagine I had to clamp down with some considerable force and I accomplished two things.

1. I tightened the nut (Yay!)
2.I destroyed the threads on the shaft…

Any suggestions on how to proceed?

-- Castor Woodworks, https://www.instagram.com/castor_woodworks

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1898 posts in 2007 days


#9 posted 09-19-2019 12:12 AM

Hmm,
Might try a thread repair tool?
There are several different types/sizes.
Need to know thread count and diameter?

Might be able to use one of these universal tools?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/NES-5-32-in-3-4-in-Universal-External-Thread-Repair-Tool-NES1A/203544779

https://www.homedepot.com/p/NES-11-16-in-1-1-2-in-Universal-External-Thread-Repair-Tool-NES2/203544781

Universal thread repair tool are not cheap. They also are PIA to fix very 1st thread.
By time you buy the universal re-threading tool, might be cheaper to replace threaded spindle?

YMMV

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View go4tech's profile

go4tech

29 posts in 1538 days


#10 posted 09-19-2019 12:39 AM

Can always go to Harbor Fright and get a tap and die set.

Used the Die as a thread chaser.

Should be able to straighten them enough to get the collet nut on.

Where there is a will, there is a way. That is until the will gets in the way.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3986 posts in 1900 days


#11 posted 09-19-2019 12:43 PM

I wonder if something like this Nicholson 4 Piece Thread Repair File Set would work?

You might need a thread gauge to figure out what TPI the threads are

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Castor Woodworks's profile

Castor Woodworks

86 posts in 353 days


#12 posted 09-19-2019 12:56 PM



I wonder if something like this Nicholson 4 Piece Thread Repair File Set would work?

You might need a thread gauge to figure out what TPI the threads are

- Lazyman

Thank you for the info I’ll have to do some research.

Thanks,

-- Castor Woodworks, https://www.instagram.com/castor_woodworks

View Castor Woodworks's profile

Castor Woodworks

86 posts in 353 days


#13 posted 09-19-2019 12:57 PM



Hmm,
Might try a thread repair tool?
There are several different types/sizes.
Need to know thread count and diameter?

Might be able to use one of these universal tools?

https://www.homedepot.com/p/NES-5-32-in-3-4-in-Universal-External-Thread-Repair-Tool-NES1A/203544779

https://www.homedepot.com/p/NES-11-16-in-1-1-2-in-Universal-External-Thread-Repair-Tool-NES2/203544781

Universal thread repair tool are not cheap. They also are PIA to fix very 1st thread.
By time you buy the universal re-threading tool, might be cheaper to replace threaded spindle?

YMMV

- CaptainKlutz

They no longer sell the spindle so i’d have to use one of the tools you suggested. Agh can’t believe i did something so dumb like that smh.

-- Castor Woodworks, https://www.instagram.com/castor_woodworks

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

5980 posts in 2234 days


#14 posted 09-19-2019 03:13 PM

If you clamped down on it hard enough to smear the threads, you may have pinched the spindle out of round too. If that’s the case you’ll never be able to tighten the collet completely and you could have massive runout with any bit you install. The best way I’ve found, after referencing how they’re assembled in the factory is to hold the armature body securely (router disassembled) to torque the retaining nut.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5759 posts in 3006 days


#15 posted 09-19-2019 03:51 PM

I’d bet that bigblockyeti is correct, if so that router is toast.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

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