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Forum topic by boblug posted 08-27-2019 03:59 PM 392 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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boblug

2 posts in 27 days


08-27-2019 03:59 PM

Topic tags/keywords: jig

When designing a router fixture for mortises is it best to have the router fixed to the jig in which the whole mass moves or have the jig stationary and the router itself move?
Thanks for any input.


9 replies so far

View Rich's profile

Rich

4848 posts in 1073 days


#1 posted 08-27-2019 04:57 PM

There are lots of different designs for mortising jigs for the router. Just search on youtube. For an example of a pretty versatile one, take a look at the Morley Mortiser.

This link is to my project page for the one I built. I also have a link to Philip Morley’s web site where he has a video that explains how to use it. Shy of an expensive commercial product, it’s about the best option for a jig that’s accurate, easy to set up and has features for things like setting the reveal between a table apron and legs.

https://www.lumberjocks.com/projects/374121

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

559 posts in 2216 days


#2 posted 08-27-2019 05:36 PM

Most of the DIY mortising blocks I have seen have the block stationary and allow the router to move in some limited range. As Rich stated, the Morely Mortiser is an excellent option. I ran across this video that has Bill Hylton walking through the construction of a mortising block. I made my own and took ideas from both the Morely Mortiser and the Bill Hylton version.

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boblug

2 posts in 27 days


#3 posted 08-27-2019 05:39 PM

Thanks for the input, it appears a better way is for the router to just move. thanks again.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1785 posts in 1978 days


#4 posted 08-27-2019 07:45 PM

I Clamp the wood, and move the router.

I built something similar to these free crestonwood plans.
http://www.crestonwood.com/mjigplans.php
But I got plans from old magazine article. Forget which one sorry?

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

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joey502

553 posts in 2002 days


#5 posted 08-28-2019 01:49 AM

For smaller pieces before i used a domino i would make jigs that clamp to the work and the router was guided by a bushing. When i attached the fence to the jig i would use spacers that would allow me to move the center on different board thicknesses to leave a reveal if needed. This method eliminates the chance for an error if the locations in two jigs were off a little. The size of the mortise does not have to be super accurate because the same jig is cutting both mortises.

A jig i made for the router table enabled me to quickly make new templates for different tasks. After a few projects i had a good set that would work for the typical projects i build.

View joey502's profile

joey502

553 posts in 2002 days


#6 posted 08-28-2019 01:52 AM

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joey502

553 posts in 2002 days


#7 posted 08-28-2019 01:53 AM

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Bill_Steele

559 posts in 2216 days


#8 posted 08-28-2019 02:04 PM

If you start to use loose tenon joinery more, you might find like I did that if you make different size mortises—it takes some time to make the matching tenon stock for each size.

I resaw to get the rough tenon stock and then run it through a drum sander to get it to the right thickness. I rip it to the desired width and then round the edges with a bullnose router bit.

As Joey502 alluded, it speeds things up if you settle on a few specific mortise sizes (which sometimes means using the exact same bit) and then cut a length of tenon stock for each size. For example, you may want 1/4” wide mortises for some projects, so you build templates (or setup blocks in the case of my jig) for the common lengths that you might use—say 3/4”, 1-1/4” and 2”. Then you make matching tenon stock for each size of mortise and keep it on hand for future projects. If you need a 1/4” x 3/4” loose tenon, you just cut off the amount you need from the matching stock on hand.

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1319 posts in 979 days


#9 posted 08-30-2019 01:16 AM

I made the Jeffrey Miller mortising block from FWW. works like a champ.

https://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/27/how-to-cut-mortises-with-a-plunge-router

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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