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Order of steps - glue or route 1st

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Forum topic by BB1 posted 08-26-2019 01:37 AM 631 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BB1

1439 posts in 1330 days


08-26-2019 01:37 AM

When making a frame do you typically route all of the edges first or do you glue up the frame first? For example on this frame I chamfered all of the edges first and then did my glue up.

Obviously the inner edge needs to be completed before glue up so this question is focused on the outside of the frame. Trying to think through any downfalls of routing after the glue-up.


23 replies so far

View rounder's profile

rounder

34 posts in 2584 days


#1 posted 08-26-2019 02:09 AM

I route before glue up in case there
is any damage.
nice frame, looks like you got some
good tight joints ,

-- rounder: I’m a wood magician I can turn a great piece of wood into scrap right before your eyes

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BB1

1439 posts in 1330 days


#2 posted 08-26-2019 02:16 AM

That has been my approach, but working on a frame this weekend got me thinking that if I routed the outside after glue up I could use routing to cleanup any glue on the edges. The “edge glue” always seems to take a lot of time to deal with after pulling out of the bracket I use (as the pic shows – no way to clean up until glue is dry).


I route before glue up in case there
is any damage.
nice frame, looks like you got some
good tight joints ,

- rounder


View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

23209 posts in 3588 days


#3 posted 08-26-2019 02:49 AM

I cut the inside rabbet for the picture and glass, glue it up, sand to make sure all edges are flush and rout the outside perimeter….in that order. I use that exact same fixture and I love it for frames.

cheers, Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8750 posts in 3059 days


#4 posted 08-26-2019 02:54 AM

Route all edges

Sand all edges

Wash coat of Shellac

Glue and clamp or use rubber bands if it’s a small perimeter.

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BB1

1439 posts in 1330 days


#5 posted 08-26-2019 10:40 AM

Think I’ll try changing up my process order. The assembly unit IS great as long as the frames aren’t too small. Then I resort to tape.


I cut the inside rabbet for the picture and glass, glue it up, sand to make sure all edges are flush and rout the outside perimeter….in that order. I use that exact same fixture and I love it for frames.

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh


Route all edges

Sand all edges

Wash coat of Shellac

Glue and clamp or use rubber bands if it s a small perimeter.

- waho6o9


I have tried using shellac on a few projects. What type do you use? I only used the rattle can type but expect that might not be the best. Thanks for sharing the rubber band idea – haven’t tried that.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

921 posts in 3275 days


#6 posted 08-26-2019 01:21 PM

When building raised panel doors, I run the outside edge through the shaper after glueup, starting on end grain. Any tearout or chipping is removed when shaping the edge grain.

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waho6o9

8750 posts in 3059 days


#7 posted 08-26-2019 02:53 PM

Some folks make their own shellac of which I haven’t done yet. A shellac with no wax in it works well for me.

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2129 posts in 2186 days


#8 posted 08-26-2019 03:17 PM

Just a note, if you buy that Shellac, store the can in a plastic coffee container or something like that that it will fit in. I had the Shellac eat a hole through a can I had on a shelf above my Rigid drum/belt sander… Took me two days to get the sander cleaned and working again…..... Haven’t repaired the wall that it ran down yet.

I route all before gluing. I would be afraid I would some how damage the outside corners if I routed after gluing.

I have a home built frame gluing clamp fashioned after the one pictured above. It work great, but takes me a long time to set it up trying to figure out where to position the stops on the rails….Is there secret to determining that other than trial and error?

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

921 posts in 3275 days


#9 posted 08-26-2019 03:34 PM

Was that shellac from the last century? I have cans for several years with no problems.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3881 posts in 1869 days


#10 posted 08-26-2019 04:06 PM

Might be too late for this one but I would rout before even before you cut the miters. You could get some chipout on the end so if your route the entire piece before cutting, any blowout will be removed at that time.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View PaulDoug's profile

PaulDoug

2129 posts in 2186 days


#11 posted 08-26-2019 05:26 PM



Was that shellac from the last century? I have cans for several years with no problems.

- ibewjon

The can was about a year old…. After it happen I read where it can happen so as a precaution, I store mine is a coffee ground container…Folgers

-- “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3639 posts in 1056 days


#12 posted 08-26-2019 06:06 PM



I cut the inside rabbet for the picture and glass, glue it up, sand to make sure all edges are flush and rout the outside perimeter….in that order. I use that exact same fixture and I love it for frames.

cheers, Jim

- Jim Jakosh

Different frame, same approach.

Only way I know without taking a LOT of time tapping out corners with a chisel that you make that rabbet in the frame for all the guts to load into. Route that inner profile first on anything that you plan to close together to shut out the corner from a cutter to get into it. Outer profiles are often easier after the fact, without a profile, definitly easier to clamp a square face. If clamping isn’t an issue, it’s still just a wash.

-- Think safe, be safe

View pottz's profile

pottz

6003 posts in 1466 days


#13 posted 08-26-2019 06:36 PM

ive always routered the material first then the miters then glue up.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View BB1's profile

BB1

1439 posts in 1330 days


#14 posted 08-27-2019 01:42 AM

Had not thought to router all profiles first. So many ways to approach the same project.

Interesting situation with the shellac. Storage consideration for sure.

Thanks for all the tips. I like making frames so may just try a couple new methods and see which work best for me.

View mtnwalton's profile

mtnwalton

58 posts in 1508 days


#15 posted 08-27-2019 03:20 AM

Do you have a link for that fixture? or name? thanks

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