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Forum topic by woodthaticould posted 08-23-2019 05:08 PM 286 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2806 days


08-23-2019 05:08 PM

I’m getting ready (finally) to start on a long awaited project:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/48607325798/in/dateposted-public/

I’m going to use simple tongue and groove assembly for the stiles and rails and 1/4” recessed panels. I’m planning to use dowels to join the case and likewise to attach the legs. I know that mortise and tenon would be better for the latter, but this is only the third project I’ve taken on and I don’t want to over complicate it.

Any comments? All are welcome.


8 replies so far

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WoodenDreams

707 posts in 390 days


#1 posted 08-23-2019 07:04 PM

Because the plan calls for corner stiles (legs) to hide the corner joints, you should be able to glue the front, sides, back and floor together (without drilling for the dowels). Then after the carcass constructed, but before you remove the clamps, you can drill the holes for the dowels and insert your dowels into the holes, then remove the clamps, cut the dowels flush that are proud. Now you can add the corner Stiles (Legs) that over lap and hide the dowels. Ready to final sand, stain and add the protective outer finish.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2806 days


#2 posted 08-23-2019 07:27 PM

Wow, thanks for all that. I appreciate it, especially since I am using a very low end dowel jig (Milescraft). I’m working from the assumption that the drill bits in the kit are substandard and am ordering a proper 3/8” brad point bit. I’m still a little unsure about how to properly attache the legs but I think I’ll manage alright.

Thanks again.

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Don Newton

720 posts in 4098 days


#3 posted 08-23-2019 07:47 PM

Looks like a great project to pocket screw together. BTW, this is my first post in in 15 months. Seems I haven’t been inspired to build anything for longer than I thought.

-- Don, Pittsburgh

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WoodenDreams

707 posts in 390 days


#4 posted 08-23-2019 08:21 PM

You can lay the carcass upside down on the work bench, fit the legs to the corners, glue all the legs in place and use rope or straps to cinch or clamp the legs tight into place, from the inside of the carcass predrill holes into the legs then add screws for extra stability. you can put trim on the inside corners to hide the screws. As Don Newton stated, pocket holes is a viable option, you can combine and use both pocket hole or the dowel joinery method for strength.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2806 days


#5 posted 08-23-2019 10:35 PM

Thanks WoodenDreams for the input. I have no issue with using pocket screws but I’m on an absurd budget and don’t want to buy a cheap version thereof. I will buy the full latest version in a while.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2806 days


#6 posted 08-23-2019 10:53 PM

Thanks everybody. This is a great helpful community.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2806 days


#7 posted 08-24-2019 12:54 AM

I guess you already knew this.

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WoodenDreams

707 posts in 390 days


#8 posted 08-24-2019 03:33 AM

After you have your carcass glued together, you can free hand drill you dowel holes without a dowel jig. just eyeball the drill bit direction to stay straight into the panels. When making each side, front and back panel assemblies – you can true them up square before you assemble them all together. Should be a fun build.

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