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Building a workbench, need it to go up and down foundation curb...

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Forum topic by Kelp posted 08-23-2019 11:31 AM 729 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kelp

5 posts in 29 days


08-23-2019 11:31 AM

I don’t know the term for the curb in garages, but we have a 2.5 car garage, and the 2 car section is set below the level of the rest of the house by about 4 inches. Here’s a drawing of the garage:

I am looking to build an approximately 5’ by 4’ rolling workbench where I have marked in red in the drawing. I would like to be able to roll the workbench out to the left in the drawing, which would have to step down about 3 or 4 inches. Then once I am finished with my work I would like to put it back in that corner, so it would have to go up that 3 or 4 inch foundation step.

Are there any ideas on types of casters or legs or something I could use to make moving the workbench up and down that step do-able? I think the workbench would be too heavy to try and manually lift and lower for that step. I was thinking maybe using a trailer jack wheel on each leg of the workbench so that I could roll one wheel off, lower the wheel, then do the next, etc. But it might be tedious to raise and lower all four of those individually.

Anything I’m not thinking of? Thank you!


20 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

578 posts in 1101 days


#1 posted 08-23-2019 11:49 AM

Have you considered building some removable ramps to navigate the step?

-- Sawdust Maker

View theart's profile

theart

123 posts in 1036 days


#2 posted 08-23-2019 12:29 PM

How much does the bench need to move around once it’s in the main portion of the garage? If it’s just going in and out, the easiest approach would be to build some 4” tall by maybe 6” wide and however long boxes that get set down on the lower floor. That way the bench just gets rolled horizontally and doesn’t need to go up and down.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

347 posts in 2216 days


#3 posted 08-23-2019 12:50 PM

4’ by 5’ is rather large for a bench. Do you mean an assembly table?

Benches are supposed to be very heavy and stable so they don’t move around when planing or sawing, or hammering. Such a bench would be difficult to even get up and down ramps.

But an assembly table would fit the size you’re talking about and not need to be so heavy or stable. Thus making it easier to figure out a way to put it up there.

I’m guessing you need to move things out of the way to get a car in the garage? Would the table need to be completely out of the way or can it hang over a few inches? I’m thinking keeping two shorter legs on the ledge and two longer legs on the floor. Then you can pull it out to use it but keep the back legs on the ledge.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View TEK73's profile

TEK73

167 posts in 189 days


#4 posted 08-23-2019 12:55 PM

I think your best solution is to use solid casters on the bench.
You push it until on short end is at the end, and lift it down. Push it until the other short end is at the edge and lift that.
Get casters that is solid and may be lifted up so that it can stand without them when the bench is not used. Build the bench as light as possible so that it is easy to move.
You may make a ramp, but pusing the bench up/down that ramp will be hard.
Mybe a ramp and a couple of tallys (or a vinch) that can be used to ensure a controlled decent and easy trip up?

But maybe you instead should consider a fold down bench that you just fold up when needed?
Seems to be an easier solution.

-- It’s good to have an end to journey toward; but it is the journey that matters, in the end. - Ursula K. LeGuin

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

919 posts in 3275 days


#5 posted 08-23-2019 01:49 PM

Why is the garage 2 levels? Sounds like a trip hazzard, even as only a garage. Pour some concrete and make it level.

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Sylvain

870 posts in 2981 days


#6 posted 08-23-2019 01:56 PM

1) A woodworking workbench doesn’t need to be that big.
Here is an easily knock-down workbench:
Moravian workbench

In this video Will Meyers assembles it in 58”

While working, one uses primarily the front six (6) inches of the workbench.

Of course if you want a 4’ X 5’ workbench it is a personal choice.

2) for casters, see here

3) Use a hand winch/hoist to climb the ramp. A ramp might be a solution, although, it is so much easier to roll things on a well swept horizontal surface. I let to your imagination how to temporary level the ground for the casters passage.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1442 posts in 3331 days


#7 posted 08-23-2019 02:19 PM



Why is the garage 2 levels? Sounds like a trip hazzard, even as only a garage. Pour some concrete and make it level.

- ibewjon

Building code in some jurisdictions require a garage to have a physical barrier preventing the ability of flammable liquids being able to flow into the dwelling if spilled

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1347 posts in 2434 days


#8 posted 08-23-2019 02:30 PM


Why is the garage 2 levels? Sounds like a trip hazzard, even as only a garage. Pour some concrete and make it level.

- ibewjon

Building code in some jurisdictions require a garage to have a physical barrier preventing the ability of flammable liquids being able to flow into the dwelling if spilled

- ChefHDAN

I have a similar curb in my garage. It is a blessing in the winter months keeping all of the crap that melts off the bottom of the cars contained leaving a neat, dry walkway.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5521 posts in 2833 days


#9 posted 08-23-2019 02:51 PM

That looks like a terrible design for a garage. Whatever you build, I predict you will quickly tire of moving it off and up that curb. I’m with ibewjon, I’d be looking at bringing the whole thing up to one level before I’d worry about a workbench.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View SMP's profile

SMP

1336 posts in 387 days


#10 posted 08-23-2019 02:52 PM


Why is the garage 2 levels? Sounds like a trip hazzard, even as only a garage. Pour some concrete and make it level.

- ibewjon

Building code in some jurisdictions require a garage to have a physical barrier preventing the ability of flammable liquids being able to flow into the dwelling if spilled

- ChefHDAN

True, but I have never seen it where you could actually go up there. Mine for example is somewhere around 6” but more of just a footing, with a ledge probably only about 3” wide. I use it to hold jigs and long scraps etc. Have never seen one where you could actually put a bench on or multiple benches in this case. Does seem odd and a hazard in itself. Would probably be an ADA violation where I live.

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

919 posts in 3275 days


#11 posted 08-23-2019 03:22 PM

There is usually just a step up into the house and a footing sticking up around the outside. Strange design. If the floor slopes to the overhead doors, nothing runs into the house. Hope you find something that works and you don’t tire of.

View ChefHDAN's profile

ChefHDAN

1442 posts in 3331 days


#12 posted 08-23-2019 06:26 PM



Why is the garage 2 levels? Sounds like a trip hazzard, even as only a garage. Pour some concrete and make it level.
- ibewjon

Building code in some jurisdictions require a garage to have a physical barrier preventing the ability of flammable liquids being able to flow into the dwelling if spilled
- ChefHDAN

True, but I have never seen it where you could actually go up there. Mine for example is somewhere around 6” but more of just a footing, with a ledge probably only about 3” wide. I use it to hold jigs and long scraps etc. Have never seen one where you could actually put a bench on or multiple benches in this case. Does seem odd and a hazard in itself. Would probably be an ADA violation where I live.
- SMP

My house back in McKinney TX had a similar design, but the bench space and entry door were on the same wall. I wound up building a workbench that was narrow enough to give me a good work surface, with enough space before the “curb” so that I could work at it. Whole thing was anchored to the walls and grossly overbuilt, first bench. For working in the car space of the garage, I used a salvaged hollow core door and some folding sawhorses for assembly etc. all of which hung on the wall when not in use.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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waho6o9

8750 posts in 3058 days


#13 posted 08-23-2019 06:47 PM

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

304 posts in 1012 days


#14 posted 08-23-2019 07:43 PM

Bridge crane.

View BubbaIBA's profile

BubbaIBA

462 posts in 2858 days


#15 posted 08-23-2019 08:11 PM



https://www.lumberjocks.com/topics/305768

HTH

- waho6o9

I agree :-).

ken

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