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Forum topic by OleGrump posted 08-22-2019 05:48 PM 395 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


08-22-2019 05:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Bought this drill press on line yesterday. Being shipped from about 90 miles away, so should have it by the beginning of next week. (YAY!!!) Unable to find any markings based on the photos. The seller says it’s 26 1/4” tall, but I don’t know if that includes the hand wheel on top, or just the column. He says it weighs about 28 pounds, so fairly substantial. Looks to be a two speed press, so I’ll have to figure out how to switch gears. Here are some of the photos that were posted on line:

Any information anyone can provide will be greatly appreciated. I’m looking forward to owning, restoring and using this wonderful old drill press.

-- OleGrump


13 replies so far

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HokieKen

10744 posts in 1617 days


#1 posted 08-22-2019 08:42 PM

I dunno Grump. Hopefully it’ll have a name or some numbers or something cast in somewhere that isn’t visible in the pictures. It does appear to have a T-track table rather than one with thru-slots which is unique from what little research I’ve done on post drills. Maybe that’ll spark some recognition for someone and help identify it. Assuming that table is original of course.

In any case, it’s a lovely tool and congrats on the purchase :-))

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#2 posted 08-22-2019 08:50 PM

Kenny, There is also a spring activated advance mechanism, (missing the spring) which is kind of interesting. Rather different from the usual “kicker arm” advancing systems. Can’t wait to start playing with, um, working on this drill press….

BTW, my step son is a Navy Cadet at VT. Two more years until graduation and a commissioned officer!

-- OleGrump

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HokieKen

10744 posts in 1617 days


#3 posted 08-22-2019 08:56 PM

Ut Prosim!

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#4 posted 08-22-2019 09:14 PM

Here are a couple more photos that might help someone ID this beast:

The missing spring attaches to the lever activated by the cam attached to the gear wheel

-- OleGrump

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tywalt

83 posts in 643 days


#5 posted 08-22-2019 09:31 PM

I had an old Millers Falls 226 drill press that looked awfully similar to that. The bracket that holds it to the pipe was identical but mine had a second (larger) wheel on the top. Could be a similar model if not the 226. See if there is any red paint on that big gear… pretty sure it just had a Millers Falls sticker on the wheel but it may have been stamped/engraved.

-- Tyler - Central TX

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#6 posted 08-23-2019 12:31 AM

Tyler, Thank you for your information! As it happens, she arrived late this afternoon, and I spent some quality alone time in the shop with her. While exploring my new love, I found that her gear wheel was indeed originally painted red. There are traces of this color inside the gear wheel and under the cam on the outside of the wheel. Seeing that the head, work table and base plate are held by hex head rather than square head bolts, she must be younger than some of the others we see. This would be in line with once having a decal on the gear wheel instead of a stamping. I’ll see what I can dig up for Millers Falls drill presses.
Kenny, you are RIGHT, Sir! Those ARE “T” track slots in the work table. (Table is 6” wide X 6 5/8 deep) Another sign of a later model drill press. The bottom of the slot is so small, I’ll have to see what might fit in them.
Until I can get a new spring, I have been able to disengage the automatic advance mechanism. I can still advance the chuck by turning the hand wheel every few cranks. While I did have to stretch budget a bit, and after a lot of consideration, I’m very glad I went ahead and bought this contraption. I know I’ll enjoy it for years.

-- OleGrump

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#7 posted 08-23-2019 12:57 PM

Millers Falls sure seemed like a good possibility, but then THIS was found while searching North Brothers hand cranked drill presses:

The advance mechanism is pretty darned similar to what I have. Makes me wonder if this wasn’t a North Brothers made for sale under another name, Wards, Sears or whatever. There are enough other similarities to prompt the rethinking of the maker.

-- OleGrump

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tywalt

83 posts in 643 days


#8 posted 08-23-2019 02:37 PM

Grump,
That pipe stem in the back and the bracket that holds the mechanism to the pipe are what reminded me of Millers Falls. I’m by no means a “vintage hand crank drill press historian” though ;)

The hex heads and t-slot do lead one to assume it is a later production or possibly a Frankenstein build. Regardless of who made it though, you have reminded me how much I miss mine and now I have another thing to keep an eye out for on ebay… so thanks for that. Enjoy breathing life back into her and keep us updated with what you find and pics when your done!

-- Tyler - Central TX

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#9 posted 08-23-2019 04:10 PM

Tyler, You are SO right. The overall construction of this press suggests a later Millers Falls, perhaps a second generation of the 226. This is my strongest leaning, with MF having produced a variety of hand cranked drill press sizes and styles. The bench mount plate, work table and head are all held with identical hex head bolts, and “give every appearance” of being original to the press, with no slop or shims at the pipe end in any of it. It all “seems to fit together” very nicely. But, Nothing can be said with 100% certainty. If this IS a “Franken Press” someone did a damned good job of creating it. What’s really throwing me is the spring action advance mechanism. Doesn’t seem to match anything yet. As a matter of PURE conjecture, this press MAY well be a late model MF, who, being competitive with other manufacturers, had to develop an automatic advance mechanism of their own, which skirted patents held by the other companies. (Anyone who manufactured anything in those days jealously guarded their patents) Until anything can be proven or disproven, I remain open to any possibility, but so far this seems the most reasonable. I feel very blessed indeed to own this larger sized bench mounted drill press. I’ve been wanting one for several years. One can certainly understand why you would miss your own MF 226. I truly hope you are able to locate another one reasonably very soon.

-- OleGrump

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#10 posted 08-23-2019 06:57 PM

BTW, The automatic advancing mechanism has now been made fully operational again. Where does one get a spring to replace one on an antique drill press? From your nearest ball point pen! Had to shorten it a little to get the right tension, but she automatically advances with a very nice “Click”. This feature would be most useful when drilling metal or close grained hardwoods. Otherwise, it’ll be disengaged and the “two crank, quarter turn” rule with the handwheel will be used.

-- OleGrump

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#11 posted 08-24-2019 01:22 AM

WE HAVE A WINNER !!! the maker is Goodell-Pratt. The number 10 drill press is identical, except without the automatic feed mechanism. (maybe added to later models?) Even the tee slot table is original. There were a couple of other models with the same gear shift mechanism. The gear wheel was originally red and had a decal on it.
I’m sure y’all are glad that I’ll shut up about it now………. 8>)

-- OleGrump

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poopiekat

4521 posts in 4213 days


#12 posted 08-24-2019 03:01 AM

I wonder if there is enough interest in starting a thread dedicated to the identification of these barn drills/post drills/manual drill presses? I own two, neither of which has verifiable manufacturer information. Who are the resident experts on said machines here?

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

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OleGrump

451 posts in 824 days


#13 posted 08-24-2019 12:11 PM

Found the drill press shown in the 1922 Goodell-Pratt catalog (on line):

The #10 is the same, just without the automatic cam feed. If you wanna start droolin’ , start flipping through this catalog.

Poopie, Don’t know who the expert around here might be, but I second the need for a thread about post drills and hand drill presses.

-- OleGrump

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