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Tips for routing grooves

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Forum topic by Greg Beagan posted 08-22-2019 12:48 PM 311 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Greg Beagan

3 posts in 25 days


08-22-2019 12:48 PM

Topic tags/keywords: router panels design furniture question tip trick

I hope you all forgive me for asking what I can only assume is, a totally rookie question but, I’m a total rookie!

I started woodworking early this year and I have put most of my emphasis on furniture making. I recently bought a Bosch router and I am trying to route decorative grooves into what probably should be a raised panel. The problem is, that the panels would ENORMOUS! 40 some inches long by 19 inches wide. I thought that some grooves with a radius in the corner would liven up such a huge blank space without using panels. I was a little concerned that panels that big would look tacky and I’m not very good at design just yet.

In your collective experience, Is there a combination of router bits that works better for this sort of thing than others. I only have a few but I have some straight bits, a round over, a cove, and Roman ogee.

Thoughts?

-- Measure, cut, sand, sand, sand, sand, finish, think of 35 ways you could’ve done it better...


10 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1969 posts in 639 days


#1 posted 08-22-2019 12:56 PM

to be a little more specific, could you post a sketch of the profile
you are looking for? a 40×19” panel is not all that big or unusual.
you can achieve some pretty nice profiles with a combination of tools.
a rough sketch of your profile would narrow down the suggestions and options available.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View tywalt's profile

tywalt

83 posts in 641 days


#2 posted 08-22-2019 01:24 PM

I’m with John, 40×19 is totally doable for frame and panel. If you’re worried about it, you can always throw a 3rd rail in there and have two panels per door (though at your size that shouldn’t be necessary).

Back to your question though, if you don’t really have anything in mind a v-groove bit is nice and simple.
https://www.whitesiderouterbits.com/collections/v-groove.

As John said too, a sketch or picture of what you were going for would go a long way.

-- Tyler - Central TX

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John Smith

1969 posts in 639 days


#3 posted 08-22-2019 03:38 PM

like Tyler said: there is an assortment of “grooving” bits on the market.
you mentioned that you are a novice beginner to routing and the bits available.
here are a few of my grooving bits:

lots of practice in similar material will lessen the frustrations of “mishaps” in routering.
and don’t focus on routing grooves. your project may also accommodate glued on
pressed wood appliques – or a marriage of both. the designs are limited only to your imagination.
how many panels do you have to make ??

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

705 posts in 388 days


#4 posted 08-22-2019 04:56 PM

Your could order free catalogues from Whiteside or other suppliers https://www.whitesiderouterbits.com/collections/form-router-bits or order free catalogues from Grizzly https://www.grizzly.com/secureforms/catalog-request or the many other suppliers such as Rockler, Woodstock Hardwood Supply, Woodcraft, etc. One thing about the free catalogues, is that you can check out the different router bit shapes before you order, but also check out the many different tools available to the woodworker.

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WoodenDreams

705 posts in 388 days


#5 posted 08-22-2019 05:05 PM

To be creative, you could make different router cut groove shapes by incorporating two or three router bits on your passes to make different decorative groove designs, instead of just using one router bit for a design shape.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5680 posts in 2970 days


#6 posted 08-22-2019 05:20 PM

I think you need to give some consideration to your technique when doing this. Routing grooves around the perimeter of a board can be tricky. You mentioned a “radius” on the corners….I’m guessing that mean you want the groove to go around on a nice turn (?) If you use an edge guide that follows the outside edge of the panel, you won’t get that result….the groove will follow the edge. You also might get burning at the corners. You could cut a template and use a bushing to get the effect (if I interpreted it correctly) of a radius corner and that would help with the possible burning issue as well.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Greg Beagan's profile

Greg Beagan

3 posts in 25 days


#7 posted 08-22-2019 05:44 PM

This is obviously very rough but it’s supposed to be the back of a hall tree. The measurement are approximate… they’re written down in my shop.

Anyway, I cut a raised panel last night and I’ve got mixed feelings about how it looks. It just feels clunky to me… I don’t know if it’s because it’s unfinished or because it so big.

Ideally, I’d finished the frame in one color and the panels and other accents in a dark walnut… just another thing to be indecisive about, I suppose. I’d just hate to get to the finishing stages and find out that i could’ve done better.

-- Measure, cut, sand, sand, sand, sand, finish, think of 35 ways you could’ve done it better...

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Greg Beagan

3 posts in 25 days


#8 posted 08-22-2019 05:49 PM

Fred, i understand what you’re saying. I was thinking more about an faux panel or an inlay on the face of the panel than routing the edges. In my mind, it looks nice but it seems that either I don’t have the skill to execute it or my mind has no idea what looks good. It never comes out how I imagined.

-- Measure, cut, sand, sand, sand, sand, finish, think of 35 ways you could’ve done it better...

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1969 posts in 639 days


#9 posted 08-22-2019 09:08 PM

WoodDad – do you have a set of plans? or, are you building from scratch.
have you googled “Hall Tree Images” ??
I think the reason you feel the panel is monstrous is because it is
when you are holding it in your hands up close.
without the frame it is intended to go in, yes, it is a big piece of wood.
in the google search, I see many ways to break up the panel with
embellishments such as grooves, small mirrors, coat hooks, etc.
I am sure that when you get it all put together, it will look just fine.
you may be overthinking the project and second guessing your skills just a bit.
put your doubts aside and build the tree to the best of your ability.
when it is in actual use full of coats, hats and gloves, the back will not even be seen
that much ~ it will look awesome !!!

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

2016 posts in 1080 days


#10 posted 08-22-2019 09:10 PM

If the boards are enormous as you say then you might consider making yourself a router table and mounting the router in (under) it.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

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