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treadmill motor disc sander

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Forum topic by cebfish posted 08-20-2019 03:39 PM 491 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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cebfish

163 posts in 3171 days


08-20-2019 03:39 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have a treadmill motor and I am making a disc sander. Is there an advantage of making it an 8” or a 12” disc? The 8” disc are cheaper. What is the advantage of making it 12”?


23 replies so far

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

304 posts in 1013 days


#1 posted 08-20-2019 03:43 PM

Larger usable surface area. Only one half of the sander is safe to use for many operations. 12” disk gives you 2 more inches of disk that are moving towards the table.

View pottz's profile

pottz

6008 posts in 1467 days


#2 posted 08-20-2019 03:49 PM



Larger usable surface area. Only one half of the sander is safe to use for many operations. 12” disk gives you 2 more inches of disk that are moving towards the table.

- RobHannon


+1 in sanding bigger is better

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View Mike_in_STL's profile

Mike_in_STL

955 posts in 1017 days


#3 posted 08-20-2019 04:15 PM

More surface area also translates to better heat dispersion.

-- Sawdust makes me whole --Mike in STL

View cracknpop's profile

cracknpop

353 posts in 2832 days


#4 posted 08-21-2019 01:35 AM

Thanks for posting this question…
I have an old treadmill motor gathering dust. I don’t have a disc sander. Be sure to share your finished project. Perhaps I will be inspired to blow the dust off that motor.

-- Rick - I know I am not perfect, but I will keep pressing on toward the goal of becoming all I am called to be.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1338 posts in 388 days


#5 posted 08-21-2019 03:22 AM

8 inch are cheaper, meaning easier and cheaper to change. But in all honesty i very rarely change my discs. I change belts more(combo belt/disc). The discs i tend to just leave an 80ish grit on for years and keep clean with one of those gummy stick things.

View Brawler's profile

Brawler

48 posts in 313 days


#6 posted 08-21-2019 11:30 AM

I am curious, why would you use a treadmill motor for a disc sander? Treadmill motors are DC and variable speed via PWM (pulse width modulation) disc sanders don’t need variable speed. I would consider using the DC motor to make my drill press, band saw, or Reeves drive type lathe variable speed. Think about it, no more pulleys to change speed on the drill press, could make that old band saw slow enough to cut steel. Just a thought folks.

-- Daniel

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10757 posts in 1621 days


#7 posted 08-21-2019 03:14 PM

I think changing speeds on a disk sander would absolutely be beneficial. I have a fixed speed belt/disk combo and a 2×72 with variable speed. The 2×72 gets used much more often and the variable speed is a big reason why.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View pottz's profile

pottz

6008 posts in 1467 days


#8 posted 08-21-2019 04:36 PM



I think changing speeds on a disk sander would absolutely be beneficial. I have a fixed speed belt/disk combo and a 2×72 with variable speed. The 2×72 gets used much more often and the variable speed is a big reason why.

- HokieKen


ok kenny tell us,why variable speed on a disc sander? i dont get it.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

304 posts in 1013 days


#9 posted 08-21-2019 05:38 PM

I think a slower speed disk sander would be great for preventing darkening in woods that burn easily like Maple, and to take less material off if you are trying to sneak up on a tight fit. Many sanding machines now have variable speed. Belt, drum, ROS, etc.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2417 posts in 3427 days


#10 posted 08-21-2019 06:01 PM

You may not use the variable speed option often, but when you need it, it would be great.

I acquired a four wheel grinder off craigslist. It came with a 1,700 RPM, 220 AC motor and I ran it that way, until I scored a 3/4 hp DC motor and controller at a yard sale for twenty. I swapped the 220 for the variable speed, 115 VDC unit, and now I can reverse the grinder and vary it between zero and two thousand RPM.

When sharpening things, slow is king.

Variable speed can be great even when grinding away at wood. Fir, pine and other softwoods tolerate high speeds much better than, say, cherry or other hardwoods that are prone to burning.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10757 posts in 1621 days


#11 posted 08-21-2019 06:41 PM

What they said pottz^ There are times I may have a really hard wood like oak or Hickory that I need to hog down to a line and I really want to lean on it, at those times, I want that thing spinning fast. On the other hand, if I’m shaving a piece of Cherry down to final size, I want that thing spinning slow since Cherry usually burns if I look at it funny.

I’m not suggesting that VS is necessary or that it would be used all the time but, I would even like to have the option of 2 speeds for my belt/disk combo sander. It would be a lot more versatile IMO.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Brawler's profile

Brawler

48 posts in 313 days


#12 posted 08-21-2019 06:43 PM

If you are burning the wood on a disc sander, try using a lighter touch. IMHO I think making a stationary disc sander variable speed is a solution looking for a problem, all the ones I have ever seen are 1725 RPM.

-- Daniel

View pottz's profile

pottz

6008 posts in 1467 days


#13 posted 08-21-2019 07:39 PM



What they said pottz^ There are times I may have a really hard wood like oak or Hickory that I need to hog down to a line and I really want to lean on it, at those times, I want that thing spinning fast. On the other hand, if I m shaving a piece of Cherry down to final size, I want that thing spinning slow since Cherry usually burns if I look at it funny.

I m not suggesting that VS is necessary or that it would be used all the time but, I would even like to have the option of 2 speeds for my belt/disk combo sander. It would be a lot more versatile IMO.

- HokieKen


ok ill buy that,never thought about before because ive never had a vs disc sander,but it makes sense.although burning wood means too much heat caused by too much pressure.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

10757 posts in 1621 days


#14 posted 08-21-2019 07:44 PM



...

ok ill buy that,never thought about before because ive never had a vs disc sander,but it makes sense.although burning wood means too much heat caused by too much pressure.

- pottz

To be clear, I don’t have a VS disk sander either. I just think it would be handy ;-) I do have a fixed speed 4×36 belt and a variable speed 2×72 and can say for sure that the variable speed is useful as heck with a belt. I suspect the same would be true with a disk but, I could be totally wrong…

And heat is caused by a combination of pressure and speed. So, to prevent burning, you can indeed apply less pressure. Or you can reduce speed.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View pottz's profile

pottz

6008 posts in 1467 days


#15 posted 08-21-2019 07:49 PM


...

ok ill buy that,never thought about before because ive never had a vs disc sander,but it makes sense.although burning wood means too much heat caused by too much pressure.

- pottz

To be clear, I don t have a VS disk sander either. I just think it would be handy ;-) I do have a fixed speed 4×36 belt and a variable speed 2×72 and can say for sure that the variable speed is useful as heck with a belt. I suspect the same would be true with a disk but, I could be totally wrong…

And heat is caused by a combination of pressure and speed. So, to prevent burning, you can indeed apply less pressure. Or you can reduce speed.

- HokieKen


what do you think about adding a speed control to the sander as you would a router? should work right?

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

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