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Need to cut multiple bevels

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Forum topic by woodthaticould posted 08-18-2019 09:53 PM 352 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


08-18-2019 09:53 PM

I’m wondering if anyone out there can help with this. As part of a project I need to cut a number of bevels on each of four lengths of wood. The pieces will start at nominally 3” square by 30” long. I definitely want more than 8 facets. I’m thinking 16 to 32, i.e., I want the pieces to approach rounds but not quite get there. I’m picturing a jig that is an angle a couple of feet long to which I can clamp the pieces and then index them with the blade at slight angles.

Am I making sense here?

Has anyone out there done this?

Any guidance is greatly appreciated.


14 replies so far

View Sylvain's profile

Sylvain

871 posts in 2982 days


#1 posted 08-20-2019 09:39 AM

no jig hand tool method

More than 16 would be very near round.

-- Sylvain, Brussels, Belgium, Europe - The more I learn, the more there is to learn

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splintergroup

2828 posts in 1705 days


#2 posted 08-20-2019 01:56 PM

Hand tools in the right hands are the easy way to go, but a jig and your TS (or a router) will work. The problem is indexing accurately. Conciebably you could build a frame around your workpiece and use the TS to get 4 cuts at top/bottom of the jig then angle and raise the blade again to get 4 more. The workpiece could then be rotated in the jig for the next set of cuts. There are plenty of router jigs to google for that use an indexing pin to realign for each pass, but more that 8 facets gets difficult.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


#3 posted 08-20-2019 02:45 PM

Thanks Sylvain and splintergroup.

I appreciate the feedback. I think I’m getting too ambitious here and should use this idea on a later project. The technique I need probably resides in the land of wood turning, the variety in which turners build blanks from a number of angled segments. I can see the idea in my mind and it looks good but I lack the skills and knowledge at this point.

Thanks again.

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theart

123 posts in 1037 days


#4 posted 08-20-2019 04:57 PM

It might be easier to start round and then plane the flats.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


#5 posted 08-20-2019 05:51 PM

Thanks for the suggestion but I don’t have that kind of hand tool skill…or a good hand plane. And I don’t want t go down that winding road looking for the best plane for this task.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


#6 posted 08-20-2019 10:47 PM

By the way, I considered buying a router bit with the right bevel angle and doing it that way but instinct tells me that the angle of the bit is nominal and not accurate enough for this.

View exslidder's profile

exslidder

38 posts in 550 days


#7 posted 08-21-2019 01:14 AM

if i under stand what your looking for i would google up “wedgie sled”. its a simple sled that you can build or buy for doing segmentation bowls and such. check it out

-- No dust on the floor....No money in the bank

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


#8 posted 08-21-2019 01:30 AM

Thanks, exslidder. I did find my way to that world. I’m not sure it’s simple, but I did look at the idea.

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1216 posts in 2022 days


#9 posted 08-21-2019 01:50 AM

I currently can’t find it but I think Izzy Swan made one where you could spin your piece and cut the various bevels/tapers by indexing the various angles. Here’s a video of a similar concept but not exactly what I recall seeing before.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XK2UZu9iNOM

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


#10 posted 08-21-2019 03:20 PM

I was looking at chamfer bits and I saw this:

https://www.rockler.com/15-chamfer-router-bit

A. If I believe the pictures and the text, the bit will provide the results I’m looking for. It might order one but first I will see how I fare using the router table for the tongue and groove joints on my project.

B. If the bit works, which is a major if, it would be easier than doing it this way than on the table saw. And of course I will definitely want to invest in the Jess-em hold downs for routing these narrow parts.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4841 posts in 1072 days


#11 posted 08-21-2019 04:17 PM


By the way, I considered buying a router bit with the right bevel angle and doing it that way but instinct tells me that the angle of the bit is nominal and not accurate enough for this.

- woodthaticould

Miter bit angles for the router are extremely accurate. It’s not nominal.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


#12 posted 08-21-2019 04:22 PM

Really? I guess that answers that question. Thanks. Rich, for the input.

Plato, or one of those smart guys, said that the student knew the answer all along.

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2828 posts in 1705 days


#13 posted 08-21-2019 05:15 PM


Miter bit angles for the router are extremely accurate. It s not nominal.

- Rich

Yes, extreme accuracy. The problem comes in holding the workpiece and how square the router table is to the bit axis.

Remember that depending on how you cut the facets can affect accumulated error. Assume you place a flat surface on the router table and the bit cuts some angle, then rotate the piece so that fresh cut angle is now riding on the table and the bit is cutting the next angle.

Any error in the angle between the table and bit is multiplied by the number of cuts. Say you use a 30 degree bit to cut 12 facets. a 0.1 degree error on your table/bit would leave over a 1 degree total error. You would be able to see the wider (or narrower) facet due to this error easily on the diameter piece you describe.

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woodthaticould

76 posts in 2810 days


#14 posted 08-21-2019 06:24 PM

That’s discouraging. Makes you wonder how anything gets done right. I could plan on getting lucky, i.e., that the error will be on the inside. Or maybe I could leave 4 surfaces without glue when I fasten the staves together (and holding them with hose clamps?). I could then take the two halves and either joint or sand them. No, that sounds unwise and dangerous.

It seems to me I saw William Ng fix imperfect joints. It’s a lot of labor after the fact but it appeared to work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gyHtW_x8Y64

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