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Routing Shaker Cabinet Doors (Assembled?)

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Forum topic by Blackfin29 posted 08-17-2019 01:14 AM 476 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackfin29

111 posts in 647 days


08-17-2019 01:14 AM

Here is my dilemma… I’m somewhat new to cabinet-making, and I just finished up a few teak cabinet doors with a simple shaker style, tongue and groove assembly. Came out great.

However, they are completely glued up now and I wish I had run a 1/4” Roundover bit across the top and bottom rails of the doors to soften the edges a bit.

My concern is running that roundover across the rails is easy, but when I get to the joint on the end of the stiles, you’re essentially coping (Or routing end grain) at that point. Can’t say I’ve ever done that? Rookie question here… is this stupid, or more importantly UNSAFE to do this? Could I tear the joint apart? It’s glued, is that bad news on the bit?

Please forgive me if this is safety 101, but I need to ask….

Thanks…

Lima


12 replies so far

View TungOil's profile

TungOil

1319 posts in 973 days


#1 posted 08-17-2019 01:24 AM

If you are talking about the outside edges of the doors, you will have no problem. Route the end grain before the long grain , that way if you get tear out you will likely cut it all away with the cut on the long grain.

Also, you might rethink using a 1/4” roundover bit on a (presumably) 3/4” door. That is way to much in my opinion, especially for shaker. I’d break the edge with a sanding block to get about a 1/32” radius on the edges and call it done personally.

-- The optimist says "the glass is half full". The pessimist says "the glass is half empty". The engineer says "the glass is twice as big as it needs to be"

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Rich

4804 posts in 1068 days


#2 posted 08-17-2019 01:31 AM

+1 on TungOil’s comment.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

707 posts in 389 days


#3 posted 08-17-2019 01:38 AM

You won’t tear out the joint, but if not cautious you could blow out the edge without a backer board. There’s several ways to do it. Have a backer board or piece of wood against the end stiles while feeding it on the router table (to prevent tear out on the ends). or route with the round over where you feel comfortable then sand the end grain area to match. or route with the round over bit to where your comfortable and hand plane the ends to match. I would do the first mentioned, but I have also sanded the round over appearance by sanding the entire edged with a edge belt sander. I’m assuming the round over look is on the outer portion of the doors, not the panel side.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3595 posts in 1052 days


#4 posted 08-17-2019 02:12 AM



That is way to much in my opinion, especially for shaker. I’d break the edge with a sanding block to get about a 1/32” radius on the edges and call it done personally.

- TungOil

What he said.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Blackfin29

111 posts in 647 days


#5 posted 08-17-2019 02:17 AM

Wow thanks SO much for the replies and you all confirmed my suspicions about the 1/4 roundover… I was thinking that would be to much, and almost reveal some tongue on the stiles.. likely not but darn close, because it is 3/4” thickness.

I also have an 1/8 and a 3/16 roundover.. which are just about silly to own because you can easily sand that over if you want. But the super crisp look of 1/8” roundover might look ok??

Thanks again….

View Rich's profile

Rich

4804 posts in 1068 days


#6 posted 08-17-2019 04:08 AM


Wow thanks SO much for the replies and you all confirmed my suspicions about the 1/4 roundover… I was thinking that would be to much, and almost reveal some tongue on the stiles.. likely not but darn close, because it is 3/4” thickness.

I also have an 1/8 and a 3/16 roundover.. which are just about silly to own because you can easily sand that over if you want. But the super crisp look of 1/8” roundover might look ok??

Thanks again….

- Blackfin29

Not silly to own. Yes, you can do that by hand, but the router bit will cut cleaner.

-- There's no such thing as a careless electrician

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Blackfin29

111 posts in 647 days


#7 posted 08-17-2019 11:34 AM


Not silly to own. Yes, you can do that by hand, but the router bit will cut cleaner.

- Rich

I agree… just thought some might believe that :-) and justifies my tool buying addiction.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5515 posts in 2829 days


#8 posted 08-17-2019 01:53 PM

I would just chamfer it, I think round over will be out of place on a Shaker door.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View DS's profile

DS

3265 posts in 2899 days


#9 posted 08-17-2019 02:12 PM

At work, we run lots of Shaker doors and they most commonly run with 1/8th inch round over, or just eased square edges (with a sander).

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Blackfin29

111 posts in 647 days


#10 posted 08-17-2019 07:12 PM

Bondogaposis I’m trying to keep the look the same throughout rest of the boat… So in keeping it consistent it’s roundover for this. I

DS I’m happy to hear that… I think I shall use the 1/8, which will blend nicely with other pieces of trim.

View WoodenDreams's profile

WoodenDreams

707 posts in 389 days


#11 posted 08-17-2019 07:52 PM

As Rich says it’s not silly to have the !/8” and 3/16” round over bits. Several uses for them. back edge of Plaques and picture frames, etc.

View SMP's profile

SMP

1335 posts in 384 days


#12 posted 08-17-2019 09:34 PM


I would just chamfer it, I think round over will be out of place on a Shaker door.

- bondogaposis

My personal opinion as well. Personally i use a slickplane just to take the arris out.

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